Sociology

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

The Major Programs

Sociology is the study of human society in all its manifestations. Its aim is to discover the process and structure of human interaction, to identify the main forces that sustain or weaken social groups, and to determine the conditions that transform social life. Sociology, like any science, is a disciplined, intellectual quest for knowledge about the fundamental nature of things.

Students selecting the Sociology major may choose from four options in the major. The General Sociology emphasis allows students to obtain a broad understanding of the concepts, methods, and theories of sociology. Students with a special interest in the areas of Law and Society or Social Services may choose a more specialized program of courses and practical experience within the sociology major. The Comparative Studies and World Development emphasis provides a sociological perspective on social and economic changes throughout the world, with a stress on relationships between “developed” and “developing” societies. In their junior year, students are encouraged to consider the Education Abroad Program—especially one in a developing country.

Career Opportunities. In the Sociology major, the General option is for students desiring a solid liberal arts education as well as those interested in graduate work in the social sciences. Options in Law and Society or Social Services prepare students for careers in such areas as law, corrections, social work or counseling. The Comparative Studies and World Development emphasis prepares students for graduate training leading to careers in international fields.

Major Advisor. Consult the Departmental Advising office in 1282 Social Sciences and Humanities Building or see http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/undergraduate/advising/advising-office.

Honors Program. An Honors Program is available to Sociology and Sociology-Organizational Studies majors who have demonstrated excellence in their field of study. To be eligible for the program, students must have a grade-point average of 3.500 in the major and the recommendation of a faculty sponsor familiar with their work. In addition to meeting the standard major requirements, students are encouraged to take a 199 course with their sponsor in the spring of their third year, prior to the seminar courses. Honors students write an honors thesis and take two quarters (eight units) of Honors coursework (SOC 194H). Successful completion of the Honors Program, when combined with College GPA requirements, enables the student to graduate with High or Highest Honors. Students should apply for the program before they begin their fourth year.


General Emphasis
Units: 73-74
Preparatory Subject Matter
29-30
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
SOC 046A
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
Choose one:
3-4
SOC 002
Self and Society (Active)
4
SOC 003
Social Problems (Active)
4
SOC 004
Immigration and Opportunity (Active)
4
SOC 005
Global Social Change: An Introduction to Macrosociology (Active)
4
SOC 011
Sociology of Labor and Employment (Active)
4
SOC 025
Sociology of Popular Culture (Active)
4
SOC 030A
Intercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (Active)
3
SOC 030B
Intercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (Active)
3
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
or
ANT 020
Comparative Cultures (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
HIS 004A
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 004B
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 004C
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 006
Introduction to the Middle East (Active)
4
HIS 007A
History of Latin America to 1700 (Active)
4
HIS 007B
History of Latin America, 1700-1900 (Active)
4
HIS 007C
History of Latin America 1900-present (Active)
4
HIS 008
History of Indian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 009A
History of East Asian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 009B
History of East Asian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 010C
World History III (Active)
4
HIS 015A
Africa to 1900 (Active)
4
HIS 015B
Africa Today (Active)
4
HIS 017A
History of the United States (Active)
4
HIS 017B
History of the United States (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
PHI 005
Critical Reasoning (Active)
4
PHI 014
Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
PHI 024
Introduction to Ethics (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
44
(A)
4
SOC 100
Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (Active)
4
(B) Choose one from each of the following four categories:
16
Individual, Culture and Society:
4
SOC 125
Sociology of Culture (Active)
4
SOC 126
Social Interaction (Active)
4
SOC 135
Social Relationships (Active)
4
Stratification and Social Differentiation:
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
Organizations and Institutions:
4
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 146
Sociology of Religion (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
Social Dynamics:
4
SOC 104
The Political Economy of International Migration (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 143A
Urban Society (Active)
4
SOC 170
Population (Active)
4
(C) Choose three upper division courses from one of the following clusters, not counting courses taken to fulfill requirement B.
12
Individual, Culture and Society:
 
SOC 102
Society and Culture of California (Active)
4
SOC 120
Deviance (Active)
4
SOC 122
Sociology of Adolescence (Active)
4
SOC 125
Sociology of Culture (Active)
4
SOC 126
Social Interaction (Active)
4
SOC 128
Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (Active)
4
SOC 129
Sociology of Black Experience in America (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 134
Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (Active)
4
SOC 135
Social Relationships (Active)
4
SOC 137
African American Society and Culture 1790 to 1990 (Active)
4
SOC 143B
Sociology of City Life (Active)
4
SOC 148
Collective Behavior (Active)
4
SOC 150
Criminology (Active)
4
SOC 152
Juvenile Delinquency (Active)
4
SOC 153
The Sociology of Childhood (Active)
4
SOC 172
Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (Active)
4
SOC 173
Sociology Through Literature (Active)
4
SOC 174
American Jewish Identities and Communities (Active)
4
SOC 175
Mass Communication (Active)
4
SOC 176
Sociology of Knowledge, Science, and Scientific Knowledge (Active)
4
Stratification and Social Differentiation:
 
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 128
Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (Active)
4
SOC 129
Sociology of Black Experience in America (Active)
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 133
Sexual Stratification and Politics (Active)
4
SOC 134
Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
SOC 171
Sociology of Violence and Inequality (Active)
4
SOC 172
Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (Active)
4
SOC 185
Social Policy (Active)
4
SOC 185Y
Social Policy (Hybrid Version) (Active)
4
SOC 188
Markets, Culture and Inequality in China (Active)
4
Not more than one of the following:
 
AAS 123
Black Female Experience in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
ASA 100
Asian American Communities (Active)
4
CHI 110
Sociology of the Chicana/o Experience (Active)
4
NAS 115
Native Americans in the Contemporary World (Active)
4
Organizations and Institutions:
 
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 124
Education and Inequality in the U.S. (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 133
Sexual Stratification and Politics (Active)
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 146
Sociology of Religion (Active)
4
SOC 149
Religion and American Society (Active)
4
SOC 150
Criminology (Active)
4
SOC 151
The Criminal Justice System (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
SOC 155
Sociology of Law (Active)
4
SOC 159
Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (Active)
4
SOC 160
Sociology of the Environment (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 180B
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 181
Social Change Organization (Active)
4
SOC 182
Utopian Communal Groups and Movements (Active)
4
SOC 183
Comparative Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 185
Social Policy (Active)
4
or
SOC 185Y
Social Policy (Hybrid Version) (Active)
4
Social Dynamics:
 
SOC 104
The Political Economy of International Migration (Active)
4
SOC 123
American Society (Active)
4
SOC 125
Sociology of Culture (Active)
4
SOC 138
Economic Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 143A
Urban Society (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
SOC 147
Sociological Perspectives on East Asia (Active)
4
SOC 148
Collective Behavior (Active)
4
SOC 156
Social Movements (Active)
4
SOC 157
Social Conflict (Active)
4
SOC 158
Women's Social Movements in Latin America (Active)
4
SOC 170
Population (Active)
4
Student-Initiated Thematic Cluster:
 
Developed with a faculty advisor and approved by the Sociology Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.
 
(D) Eight units of Sociology beyond courses taken to fulfill above requirements, and outside of the course cluster used to fulfill requirement C.
8
(E) One additional elective upper division Sociology course not already used to fulfill other major requirements; may use four units of 192, 194H, 195 or 199.
4
Law and Society Emphasis
Units: 73-74
Preparatory Subject Matter
30
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
Choose one:
4
SOC 003
Social Problems (Active)
4
SOC 004
Immigration and Opportunity (Active)
4
SOC 011
Sociology of Labor and Employment (Active)
4
SOC 046A
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
Choose one:
4
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
ANT 020
Comparative Cultures (Active)
4
POL 001
American National Government (Active)
4
POL 003
International Relations (Active)
4
POL 004
Basic Concepts in Political Theory (Active)
4
POL 007
Contemporary Issues in Law and Politics (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
HIS 004A
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 004B
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 004C
History of Western Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 006
Introduction to the Middle East (Active)
4
HIS 007A
History of Latin America to 1700 (Active)
4
HIS 007B
History of Latin America, 1700-1900 (Active)
4
HIS 007C
History of Latin America 1900-present (Active)
4
HIS 008
History of Indian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 009A
History of East Asian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 009B
History of East Asian Civilization (Active)
4
HIS 010C
World History III (Active)
4
HIS 015A
Africa to 1900 (Active)
4
HIS 015B
Africa Today (Active)
4
HIS 017A
History of the United States (Active)
4
HIS 017B
History of the United States (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
PHI 005
Critical Reasoning (Active)
4
PHI 014
Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
PHI 024
Introduction to Ethics (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
43-44
SOC 100
Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (Active)
4
SOC 155
Sociology of Law (Active)
4
Choose from the following categories:
 
Individual Culture and Society:
4
SOC 125
Sociology of Culture (Active)
4
SOC 126
Social Interaction (Active)
4
SOC 135
Social Relationships (Active)
4
Stratification and Social Differentiation:
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
Organizations and Institutions:
4
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 146
Sociology of Religion (Active)
4
SOC 160
Sociology of the Environment (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
Crime and Social Dynamics:
12
SOC 120
Deviance (Active)
4
SOC 150
Criminology (Active)
4
SOC 151
The Criminal Justice System (Active)
4
SOC 152
Juvenile Delinquency (Active)
4
SOC 171
Sociology of Violence and Inequality (Active)
4
Stratifications and Social Dynamics:
4
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 137
African American Society and Culture 1790 to 1990 (Active)
4
SOC 148
Collective Behavior (Active)
4
SOC 156
Social Movements (Active)
4
SOC 157
Social Conflict (Active)
4
SOC 158
Women's Social Movements in Latin America (Active)
4
AAS 123
Black Female Experience in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
AAS 145A
Black Social and Political Thought (Active)
4
AAS 145B
Black Intellectuals (Active)
4
CHI 130
United States-Mexican Border Relations (Active)
4
CHI 132
Political Economy of Chicana/o Communities (Active)
4
NAS 117
Native American Governmental Decision Making (Active)
4
NAS 118
Native American Politics (Active)
4
Legal Studies:
3-4
ASA 155
Asian American Legal History (Active)
4
CHI 182
Race and Juvenile Justice (Active)
4
ENL 107
Freedom of Expression (Active)
4
ESP 161
Environmental Law (Active)
4
ETX 138
Legal Aspects of Environmental Toxicology (Active)
3
HYD 150
Water Law (Active)
3
PHI 119
Philosophy of Law (Active)
4
POL 122
International Law (Active)
4
POL 150
Judicial Politics and Constitutional Interpretation (Active)
4
POL 151
The Constitutional Politics of the First Amendment and the Right to Privacy. (Active)
4
POL 152
The Constitutional Politics of the Equality (Active)
4
POL 154
Legal Philosophy (Active)
4
PSC 153
Psychology and Law (Active)
4
UWP 104B
Writing in the Professions: Law (Active)
4
WMS 140
Gender and Law (Active)
4
Choose one additional elective upper division Sociology course not already used to fulfill other major requirements; may use four units of 192, 194H, 195 or 199.
4
Social Services Emphasis
Units: 72-74
Preparatory Subject Matter
28-30
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
SOC 002
Self and Society (Active)
4
or
SOC 003
Social Problems (Active)
4
SOC 046A
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
PSC 001
General Psychology (Active)
4
Choose two:
6-8
ASA 001
Historical Experience of Asian Americans (Active)
4
ASA 002
Contemporary Issues of Asian Americans (Active)
4
AAS 010
African-American Culture and Society (Active)
4
AAS 015
Introduction to African American Humanities (Active)
4
CHI 010
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies (Active)
4
CHI 050
Chicana and Chicano Culture (Active)
4
NAS 001
Introduction to Native American Studies (Active)
4
NAS 010
Native American Experience (Active)
4
SOC 004
Immigration and Opportunity (Active)
4
SOC 011
Sociology of Labor and Employment (Active)
4
SOC 030A
Intercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (Active)
3
SOC 030B
Intercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (Active)
3
Depth Subject Matter
44
SOC 100
Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
SOC 185
Social Policy (Active)
4
or
SOC 185Y
Social Policy (Hybrid Version) (Active)
4
Choose one:
 
PSC 140
Developmental Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 142
Social and Personality Development (Active)
4
PSC 151
Social Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 168
Abnormal Psychology (Active)
4
Choose from the following categories:
 
Social Issues; choose two:
8
SOC 104
The Political Economy of International Migration (Active)
4
SOC 120
Deviance (Active)
4
SOC 122
Sociology of Adolescence (Active)
4
SOC 124
Education and Inequality in the U.S. (Active)
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 143A
Urban Society (Active)
4
SOC 146
Sociology of Religion (Active)
4
SOC 149
Religion and American Society (Active)
4
SOC 150
Criminology (Active)
4
SOC 153
The Sociology of Childhood (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
SOC 155
Sociology of Law (Active)
4
SOC 156
Social Movements (Active)
4
SOC 160
Sociology of the Environment (Active)
4
SOC 170
Population (Active)
4
SOC 171
Sociology of Violence and Inequality (Active)
4
Social Interaction; choose one:
4
SOC 126
Social Interaction (Active)
4
SOC 128
Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (Active)
4
SOC 143B
Sociology of City Life (Active)
4
SOC 148
Collective Behavior (Active)
4
SOC 157
Social Conflict (Active)
4
Race and Ethnicity; choose one:
4
AAS 100
Survey of Ethnicity in the US (Active)
4
ASA 102
Theoretical Perspective in Asian American Studies (Active)
4
ASA 131
Ethnicity, Culture, and the Self (Active)
4
ASA 150
Filipino American Experience (Active)
4
ASA 150B
Japanese American Experience (Active)
4
ASA 150C
Chinese American Experience (Active)
4
ASA 150D
Korean American Experience (Active)
4
ASA 150E
Southeast Asian American Experience (Active)
4
CHI 110
Sociology of the Chicana/o Experience (Active)
4
CRD 176
Comparative Ethnicity (Active)
4
NAS 115
Native Americans in the Contemporary World (Active)
4
SOC 129
Sociology of Black Experience in America (Active)
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 134
Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (Active)
4
SOC 137
African American Society and Culture 1790 to 1990 (Active)
4
SOC 172
Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (Active)
4
Gender; choose one:
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 133
Sexual Stratification and Politics (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
SOC 172
Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (Active)
4
Organizational Behavior; choose one:
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 146
Sociology of Religion (Active)
4
SOC 151
The Criminal Justice System (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
SOC 159
Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 180B
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 181
Social Change Organization (Active)
4
SOC 182
Utopian Communal Groups and Movements (Active)
4
SOC 183
Comparative Organizations (Active)
4
Comparative Studies and World Development Emphasis
Units: 78-108
Preparatory Subject Matter
30-60
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
SOC 005
Global Social Change: An Introduction to Macrosociology (Active)
4
SOC 046A
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
ECN 001B
Principles of Macroeconomics (Active)
4
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
or
ANT 020
Comparative Cultures (Active)
4
HIS 010C
World History III (Active)
4
or
POL 002
Introduction to Comparative Politics (Active)
4
Course work in one modern foreign language at the two-year level or provide proof of proficiency.
27-30
Depth Subject Matter
48
SOC 100
Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (Active)
4
SOC 104
The Political Economy of International Migration (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 170
Population (Active)
4
Choose one:
 
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
Choose three:
12
ANT 127
Urban Anthropology (Active)
4
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 143A
Urban Society (Active)
4
SOC 144
Agriculture and Society (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
SOC 156
Social Movements (Active)
4
SOC 158
Women's Social Movements in Latin America (Active)
4
Regional focus; choose three from one of the following groups:
12
Africa:
 
AAS 110
West African Social Organization (Active)
4
AAS 111
Cultural Politics in Contemporary Africa (Active)
4
AAS 162
Islam in Africa and the Americas (Active)
4
ANT 140A
Cultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (Active)
4
ANT 140B
Cultures and Societies of East and South Africa (Active)
4
HIS 115A
History of West Africa (Active)
4
HIS 115B
History of East Africa and the Indian Ocean (Active)
4
HIS 115C
History of Southern Africa from Exploration to the Rainbow Nation (Active)
4
HIS 116
African History: Special Themes (Active)
4
POL 134
Africa and U.S. Foreign Policy (Active)
4
Latin America:
 
AAS 107A
African Descent Communities and Culture in the Caribbean and Latin America (Active)
4
AAS 180
Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (Active)
4
ANT 144
Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (Active)
4
HIS 159
Women and Gender in Latin American History (Active)
4
HIS 162
History of the Andean Region (Active)
4
HIS 163A
History of Brazil (Active)
4
HIS 163B
History of Brazil (Active)
4
HIS 164
History of Chile (Active)
4
HIS 165
Latin American Social Revolutions (Active)
4
HIS 166A
History of Mexico to 1848 (Active)
4
HIS 166B
History of Mexico since 1848 (Active)
4
HIS 167
Modern Latin American Cultural and Intellectual History (Active)
4
HIS 168
History of Inter-American Relations (Active)
4
NAS 120
Ethnopolitics of South American Indians (Active)
4
NAS 133
Ethnohistory of Native People of Mexico and Central America (Active)
4
SOC 158
Women's Social Movements in Latin America (Active)
4
SPA 170
Introduction to Latin American Culture (Active)
4
SPA 172
Mexican Culture (Active)
4
SPA 173
Cinema and Latin American Culture (Active)
4
Middle East:
 
ANT 142
Peoples of the Middle East (Active)
4
HIS 112A
Topics in Pre-Modern Jewish History (Active)
4
HIS 112B
Topics in Modern Jewish History (Active)
4
HIS 113
History of Modern Israel (Active)
4
HIS 190A
Middle Eastern History I: The Rise of Islam, 600-1000 (Active)
4
HIS 190B
Middle Eastern History II: The Age of the Crusades, 1001-1400 (Active)
4
HIS 190C
Middle Eastern History III: The Ottomans, 1401-1730 (Active)
4
HIS 193A
History of the Modern Middle East, 1750-1914 (Active)
4
HIS 193B
History of the Modern Middle East, From 1914 (Active)
4
Jewish Studies; see an advisor
 
Middle Eastern Studies; see an advisor
 
RST 162
Introduction to Islamic Law (Active)
4
WMS 184
Gender in the Arab World (Active)
4
Asia-China & Japan:
 
AAS 107C
African Descent Communities and Culture in Asia (Active)
4
ANT 148A
Culture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (Active)
4
ANT 149A
Traditional Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 149B
Contemporary Japanese Society (Active)
4
EAS 113
Cinema and Society in China (Active)
4
ECN 171
Economy of East Asia (Active)
4
HIS 191A
Classical China (Active)
4
HIS 191B
High Imperial China (Active)
4
HIS 191C
Late Imperial China (Active)
4
HIS 191D
Nineteenth Century China: The Empire Confronts the West (Active)
4
HIS 191E
The Chinese Revolution (Active)
4
HIS 191F
History of the People's Republic of China (Active)
4
HIS 191G
Special Topics in Chinese History to 1800 (Active)
4
HIS 191H
Special Topics in Chinese History after 1800 (Active)
4
HIS 191J
Sex and Society in Modern Chinese History (Active)
4
HIS 194A
Aristocratic and Feudal Japan (Active)
4
HIS 194B
Early Modern Japan (Active)
4
HIS 194C
Modern Japan (Active)
4
POL 148A
Government and Politics of East Asia: China (Active)
4
POL 148B
Government and Politics in East Asia: Japan (Active)
4
RST 165
Islam in Asia (Active)
4
RST 170
Buddhism (Active)
4
RST 172
Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism (Active)
4
SOC 147
Sociological Perspectives on East Asia (Active)
4
SOC 188
Markets, Culture and Inequality in China (Active)
4
Southeast Asia/Pacific:
 
ANT 143A
Ethnology of Southeast Asia (Active)
4
ANT 145
Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (Active)
4
ANT 147
Modern South Asia Cinema (Active)
4
ECN 171
Economy of East Asia (Active)
4
HIS 191A
Classical China (Active)
4
HIS 191B
High Imperial China (Active)
4
HIS 191C
Late Imperial China (Active)
4
HIS 191D
Nineteenth Century China: The Empire Confronts the West (Active)
4
HIS 191E
The Chinese Revolution (Active)
4
HIS 191F
History of the People's Republic of China (Active)
4
HIS 191G
Special Topics in Chinese History to 1800 (Active)
4
HIS 191H
Special Topics in Chinese History after 1800 (Active)
4
HIS 191J
Sex and Society in Modern Chinese History (Active)
4
HIS 195B
History of Modern Korea (Active)
4
HIS 196A
Medieval India (Active)
4
HIS 196B
Modern India (Active)
4
POL 148B
Government and Politics in East Asia: Japan (Active)
4
POL 148C
Government and Politics in East Asia: Southeast Asia (Active)
4
RST 165
Islam in Asia (Active)
4
RST 170
Buddhism (Active)
4
RST 172
Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism (Active)
4
Total: 72-108

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

The Major Programs

The Organizational Studies (OS) major is designed to provide a broad understanding of the political, social, and economic organizations that make up modern society. Whether thinking about the structure of government bureaucracies, legal systems, economic markets, educational systems, or workplaces, OS offers an interdisciplinary view from which to understand the contemporary world in which complex and formal organizations are ubiquitous. Formal organizations influence how we feel, what we think, and what we can accomplish. As such, the OS major provides both a basic understanding of the field as well as enhancing your ability to pursue their more specialized career interests.

At the upper-division level, you can chose one of four specialized tracks, any one of which will help to better identify and inform your career goals—whether that be in postgraduate education or a specific type of job—and pursue them after graduation. Whether you select the “Business and Society,” “Public Policy and Social Welfare,” “Nonprofit and Social Change Organizations” or the “Student-Initiated Theme” track, once completed you will have a unique and valuable area of expertise.

Students who plan to enroll in graduate programs in business, public policy, public administration, and education are advised to develop proficiencies in statistics and calculus (such as the MAT 016 series).

Track 1: The Business and Society track is for students who hold an interest in or wish to pursue careers in management or corporate professions and who are interested in economic institutions and commerce, management and administration, work and workplaces, and labor markets. Courses in this cluster analyze businesses, firms, corporations, and markets—nationally and globally—and their place in society, historically and in the present, from a critical perspective. The BAS examines the origins of business corporations and economic markets (and relations); the power relations, inequalities, and stratification associated with contemporary business organizations (firms and corporations); why business organizations rely on particular organizational structures to increase their efficiencies and effectiveness; and overviews of the role business and regulatory organizations play in the economy.

Postgraduate training and careers that follow from this cluster:

  • Professional training: MBA programs; mediation programs; law; public policy
  • Graduate training: sociology; economics; Ph.D. business school programs (with concentrations in organizational behavior, entrepreneurship, industrial relations, economic analysis, policy analysis, labor relations)
  • Career paths: managers, human resources professionals, project managers, diversity personnel, corporate social responsibility personnel, lobbyists, business entrepreneur, labor relations specialists, creative professionals, research staff at policy institutes such as Economic Policy Institute, Urban InstituteE2. Track 2: Public Policy and Social Welfare (PPSW)

Track 2: Public Policy and Social Welfare (PPSW)

The PPSW track is for students who hold an interest in or plan to pursue careers in government and/or social welfare organizations. Courses in this track emphasize how formal organizations and institutions emerge to address key social problems and the policies they generate and utilize to solve them; the unique challenges that government and other policy oriented organizations confront in addressing and managing public problems and promoting the common good; and the dynamics and special circumstances that specific organizational/institutional policy fields such as education, health care, and social welfare confront in seeking to fulfill their charge.

Postgraduate training and careers that follow from this track:

  • Professional training: programs in public policy, public administration, government, social welfare, counseling, public affairs, law, leadership institutes, community psychology
  • Graduate training: Ph.D. programs in sociology, political science, public administration, education, educational leadership
  • Career paths: consultants, social service workers and administrators, staff at policy institutes and think tanks, program evaluation and development, nonprofit administrators, lawyers, teachers, research staff at policy institutes and think tanks, leadership positions in education, including higher education, counselors

Track 3: Nonprofit and social movement organizations (NSMO):

The NSMO track is for students who wish to contribute to local, national, and global transformation(s), to social justice, and/or who plan to pursue a career in the non-profit sector focusing on addressing specific causes and fulfilling social agendas. Students in this cluster may have particular interest in understanding the role that informal and formal organizations—from well-organized and mature non-profits to emergent social movement organizations—play in responding to and affecting social change. This cluster familiarizes students with the unique capacity of organizations to change the world but simultaneously, the barriers, limitations, and challenges to doing so.

Postgraduate training and careers that follow from this track:

  • Professional training: programs in community development, regional development, urban development, public policy, public administration, Master’s programs in social change, law and social change, business programs with a concentration in corporate responsibility
  • Graduate training: programs sociology, history, labor studies, development, international relations, political science
  • Career paths: working in nongovernmental organizations around the world (NGO’s), joining the Peace Corps or Teach America; teaching in other countries; jobs in any number of areas that are the focus of social change and social justice efforts (energy, housing, labor, community and regional development, health, corporate social responsibility); working in for-profit companies in the areas of energy, corporate social responsibility, work/family support programs, research staff at policy institutes and think tanks

Track 4: Student-Initiated Track:

Select a combination of five courses from any of the above 3 themes (at least three courses should be from SOC).  Students choosing this track must meet with a SOC undergraduate advisor to obtain approval of selected courses.

Major Advisor. Consult the Departmental Advising office in 1282 Social Sciences and Humanities Building or see http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/undergraduate/advising/advising-office.

Honors Program. An Honors Program is available to Sociology and Sociology-Organizational Studies majors who have demonstrated excellence in their field of study. To be eligible for the program, students must have a grade-point average of 3.500 in the major and the recommendation of a faculty sponsor familiar with their work. In addition to meeting the standard major requirements, students are encouraged to take a 199 course with their sponsor in the spring of their third year, prior to the seminar courses. Honors students write an honors thesis and take two quarters (eight units) of Honors coursework (SOC 194H). Successful completion of the Honors Program, when combined with College GPA requirements, enables the student to graduate with High or Highest Honors. Students should apply for the program before they begin their fourth year.

Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 30
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
SOC 002
Self and Society (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
SOC 004
Immigration and Opportunity (Active)
4
SOC 005
Global Social Change: An Introduction to Macrosociology (Active)
4
SOC 011
Sociology of Labor and Employment (Active)
4
SOC 046A
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
ECN 001A
Principles of Microeconomics (Active)
4
ECN 001B
Principles of Macroeconomics (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 45
SOC 100
Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 106
Intermediate Social Statistics (Active)
5
or
STA 103
Applied Statistics for Business and Economics (Active)
4
Choose one:
 
CMN 120
Interpersonal Communication (Active)
4
CMN 130
Group Communication (Active)
4
CMN 136
Organizational Communication (Active)
4
CMN 170
Digital Technology and Social Change (Active)
4
or
CMN 170V
Digital Technology and Social Change (Active)
4
CMN 172
Interpersonal Technologies (Active)
4
SOC 126
Social Interaction (Active)
4
SOC 135
Social Relationships (Active)
4
Choose five from one of the following tracks; at least three of the five must be from Sociology:
20
Track 1: Business and Society
 
ARE 112
Fundamentals of Organization Management (Active)
4
ARE 130
Agricultural Markets (Active)
4
ARE 132
Cooperative Business Enterprises (Active)
4
AMS 125
Corporate Cultures (Active)
4
CRD 118
Technology and Society (Active)
4
CRD 141
Organization of Economic Space (Active)
4
CRD 156
Community Economic Development (Active)
5
CRD 162
People, Work and Technology (Active)
5
ECN 110B
World Economic History Since the Industrial Revolution (Active)
4
ECN 111B
Economics History (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ECN 116
Comparative Economic Systems (Active)
4
ECN 121A
Industrial Organization (Active)
4
ECN 151A
Economics of the Labor Market (Active)
4
ECN 151B
Economics of Human Resources (Active)
4
HIS 185B
History of Technology in America (Active)
4
HIS 194D
Business and Labor in Modern Japan (Active)
4
MGT 150
Technology Management (Active)
4
POL 180
Bureaucracy in Modern Society (Active)
4
POL 187
Administrative Theory (Active)
4
SOC 103
Evaluation Research Methods (Active)
4
SOC 138
Economic Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 159
Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (Active)
4
SOC 160
Sociology of the Environment (Active)
4
SOC 188
Markets, Culture and Inequality in China (Active)
4
Track 2: Public Policy and Social Welfare
 
ARE 147
Resource and Environment Policy Analysis (Active)
3
or
ARE 147M
Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis (Active)
2
CRD 142
Rural Change in the Industrialized World (Active)
4
CRD 151
Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (Active)
5
CRD 152
Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 154
Social Theory and Community Change (Active)
4
CRD 158
Small Community Governance (Active)
4
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
CRD 171
Housing and Social Policy (Active)
4
CRD 172
Social Inequality: Issues and Innovations (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ECN 116
Comparative Economic Systems (Active)
4
POL 107
Environmental Politics and Administration (Active)
4
POL 118A
History of Political Theory: Ancient (Active)
4
POL 118B
History of Political Theory: Early Modern (Active)
4
POL 118C
History of Political Theory: Late Modern (Active)
4
POL 180
Bureaucracy in Modern Society (Active)
4
POL 187
Administrative Theory (Active)
4
SOC 103
Evaluation Research Methods (Active)
4
SOC 104
The Political Economy of International Migration (Active)
4
SOC 124
Education and Inequality in the U.S. (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
SOC 162
Society, Culture, and Health (Active)
4
SOC 163
Population Health: Social Determinants and Disparities in Health (Active)
4
SOC 164
Health Policy and Politics (Active)
4
CRD 149
Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (Active)
4
SOC 185
Social Policy (Active)
4
Track 3: Nonprofit and Social Movement Organizations
 
CHI 132
Political Economy of Chicana/o Communities (Active)
4
CRD 140
Dynamics of Regional Development (Active)
4
CRD 147
Community Youth Development (Active)
4
CRD 149
Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (Active)
4
CRD 152
Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 154
Social Theory and Community Change (Active)
4
CRD 156
Community Economic Development (Active)
5
CRD 158
Small Community Governance (Active)
4
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
ECN 111B
Economics History (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ECN 116
Comparative Economic Systems (Active)
4
HIS 185B
History of Technology in America (Active)
4
HIS 194D
Business and Labor in Modern Japan (Active)
4
POL 180
Bureaucracy in Modern Society (Active)
4
POL 187
Administrative Theory (Active)
4
SOC 103
Evaluation Research Methods (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
SOC 156
Social Movements (Active)
4
SOC 160
Sociology of the Environment (Active)
4
SOC 163
Population Health: Social Determinants and Disparities in Health (Active)
4
SOC 164
Health Policy and Politics (Active)
4
SOC 181
Social Change Organization (Active)
4
SOC 182
Utopian Communal Groups and Movements (Active)
4
SOC 183
Comparative Organizations (Active)
4
WMS 187
Gender and Public Policy (Active)
4
Track 4: Student-Initiated Track:
 
Choose a combination of five courses from any of the above three themes; at least three courses should be from SOC. Students choosing this track must meet with a SOC undergraduate adviser to obtain approval of selected courses.
 
Choose one:
4
SOC 128
Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (Active)
4
SOC 130
Race Relations (Active)
4
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 134
Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
SOC 172
Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (Active)
4
Choose one additional elective upper division Sociology course not already used to fulfill other major requirements; may use four units of 192, 194H, 195, or 199.
4
Total: 75

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

Graduate Study. The Department offers programs of study and research leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office or on our website.

The Master of Science degree is offered only in route to the Ph.D.

Graduate students in Sociology have the opportunity to pursue designated emphases in Critical Theory, Social Theory and Comparative History, Native American Studies, Economy, Justice and Society, or Feminist Theory and Research. See these headings for further details on these interdisciplinary programs.

Graduate Advisors. Consult the Graduate Program Coordinator in 327 Young Hall.

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

Graduate Study. The Department offers programs of study and research leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office or on our website.

Graduate students in Sociology have the opportunity to pursue designated emphases in Critical Theory, Social Theory and Comparative History, Native American Studies, Economy, Justice and Society, or Feminist Theory and Research. See these headings for further details on these interdisciplinary programs.

Graduate Advisors. Consult the Graduate Program Coordinator in 327 Young Hall.

(College of Letters and Science)

Ryken Grattet, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1283 Social Sciences and Humanities Building; 530-752-0782; http://sociology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://sociology.ucdavis.edu/people

Sociology
Units: 20
Choose any five upper division Sociology courses, except:
20
SOC 190X
Seminar in Sociological Analysis (Active)
4
SOC 191
Workshop in Contemporary Sociological Theory (Active)
4
SOC 192
Internship and Research Practicum (Active)
2-6
SOC 193
Workshop in Field Research (Active)
2
SOC 194H
Special Study for Honors Students (Active)
1-5
SOC 197T
Tutoring in Sociology (Active)
1-4
SOC 198
Directed Group Study (Active)
1-5
SOC 199
Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (Active)
1-5
Total: 20
Courses in SOC:
SOC 001Introduction to Sociology (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Principles and basic concepts of sociology. The study of groups, culture, collective behavior, classes and caste, community and ecology, role, status, and personality. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 002Self and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Exploration of how self and identity are formed and transformed by socialization and social interaction in relation to roles, groups, institutions, power, and social change. Consideration of how people make decisions, fall in love, and come to blows. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2015 Winter Quarter.
SOC 003Social Problems (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). General sociological consideration of contemporary social problems in relation to sociocultural change and programs for improvement. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 004Immigration and Opportunity (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Social and demographic analysis of immigration: motives and experiences of immigrants; immigration and social mobility; immigration, assimilation, and social change; multicultural societies. Detailed study of immigration into the U.S., with comparative studies of Europe, Australia, and other host countries. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 005Global Social Change: An Introduction to Macrosociology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to change and diversity in world history, including the United States. Examines population and family, technological change and economic development, power and status, culture and identity. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, SS, WC. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 006Health and Illness (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the sociology of health and illness, including social determinants of health, social inequalities in health/health disparities, social construction of health, the organization of health care, and the politics of health care reform. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 011Sociology of Labor and Employment (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Labor and employment issues in the contemporary United States with some use of historical and comparative materials. Topics will include strategies pursued by employers and employees, labor market discrimination and the role of social policies in shaping labor markets. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2006 Summer Session 1.
SOC 012YData Visualization in the Social Sciences (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—1.5 hour(s); Web Virtual Lecture—1.5 hour(s). Introduction to quantitative data across the social sciences (Communications, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and other disciplines). Transforming data, describing data, producing graphs, visual reasoning, and interpretations. (Same course as CMN 012Y, PSC 12Y, and POL 012Y.) (Letter.) GE credit: QL, VL. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
SOC 025Sociology of Popular Culture (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Social mechanisms that shape modern popular culture. High, folk, and mass culture: historical emergence of popular culture. Mass media, commercialization, ideology and cultural styles. Theories and methods for analyzing cultural expressions in pop music, street art, film, television, and advertising. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, VL. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 030AIntercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (3) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion—1.5 hour(s). Macro-structural analysis of contemporary multicultural societies; immigration and assimilation in comparative perspective; social construction of racial and ethnic group identities; ethnicity and gender; group conflict and cooperation; controversies surrounding multiculturalism. First course in a two-course Multicultural Immersion Program. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2005 Fall Quarter.
SOC 030BIntercultural Relations in Multicultural Societies (3) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion—1.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 030A; or Consent of Instructor. Social-psychological analysis of personal experiences living in a multicultural society; conforming to or rejecting group identity or stereotypes; managing and reducing conflict; cross-cultural communication; promises and problems of diversity at UCD. Second course in a two-course Multicultural Immersion Program. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2005 Winter Quarter.
SOC 046AIntroduction to Social Research (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Examination of the methodological problems of social research. Selection and definition of problems of investigation, data-gathering techniques, and sampling. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 046BIntroduction to Social Research (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Data-analysis techniques, measurement, scaling, multivariate analysis, and quantitative measures of association. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SS. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
SOC 090XLower Division Seminar (1-2) Active
Seminar—1-2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Lower division standing. Limited enrollment. Examination of a special topic in sociology through shared readings, discussions, written assignments, or special activities such as fieldwork, laboratory work, etc. May not be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 098Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Primarily intended for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 099Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 100Origins of Modern Sociological Theory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Origins of modern sociological thought. Special emphasis on three major theorists from the classical tradition of nineteenth century European social thought: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 102Society and Culture of California (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper; Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. California's distinctive society and culture; sociological analyses of topical issues concerning diversity, environment, cities. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 103Evaluation Research Methods (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 002 or SOC 003 recommended; SOC 046A and SOC 046B recommended. Surveys applications of research methods to the evaluation of social programs, primarily emphasizing methodological issues, e.g., research design and data collection; uses of evaluation research are also discussed and placed in theoretical context. Participation in an evaluation project. (Letter.) GE credit: SL, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 104The Political Economy of International Migration (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, SOC 003, or SOC 004 recommended. Analysis of worldwide migration patterns, and social scientific theories of international and transnational migration. Focus in economical, political, and social impact of immigration and potential for international and regional cooperation. (Same course as IRE 104.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 106Intermediate Social Statistics (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 046B; or Consent of Instructor. Intermediate level course in statistical analysis of social data, emphasizing the logic and use of statistical measures, procedures, and mathematical models especially relevant to sociological analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SL, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 118Political Sociology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Relation of social cleavages and social cohesion to the functioning of political institutions; the social bases of local and national power structures; social sources of political movement, analysis of concepts of alienation, revolution, ideology, ruling class, and elite. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 120Deviance (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Social structural sources, institutional practices and microprocesses associated with illegality, evil, disease, immorality, disability, racial and class differences, citizenship, and the body. Special emphasis on expert knowledge and the production and management of social difference. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 122Sociology of Adolescence (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Chronological age and social status; analysis of social processes bearing upon the socialization of children and adolescents. The emergence of youth cultures. Generational succession as a cultural problem. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 123American Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). The demographic and social structure of American society and population, with emphasis on ethnic and class groups as bases for political and economic interest. Attention to selected current social controversies. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 124Education and Inequality in the U.S. (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Functions of schooling in contemporary U.S. society. Racial, ethnic, social class, and gender inequalities in student outcomes. Consideration of classic and current controversies in the sociology of education and education policy. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 125Sociology of Culture (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Sociological approaches to study of historical and contemporary culture and mass media, and their structuring in relation to social actors, institutions, stratification, power, the production of culture, audiences, and the significance of culture in processes of change. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 126Social Interaction (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Everyday interaction in natural settings; ethnographic approaches to the understanding of social meanings, situations, personal identity and human relationships. Particular attention to the work of Erving Goffman and to principles of field observation and qualitative analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 128Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of the influences of cultural differences and racial stratification on interpersonal interaction in instrumental settings (e.g., work, education, political action) and intimate settings (e.g., friendship, love, marriage, family). Minority/majority relationships. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 129Sociology of Black Experience in America (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Survey of historical and contemporary theoretical sociological perspectives on the Black experience in United States. Emphasis on comparisons of Black sociological perspectives and mainstream perspectives of specific sociologists. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 130Race Relations (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Functions of the social definitions of race and racial groups. Analysis of racial conflict, oppression, and other forms of ethnic stratification. Models of ethnic interaction and social change. Emphasis on racial relationships within the U.S. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 131The Family (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Contemporary family life in historical and cross-cultural perspective. How different family forms arose, their significance today and prospects for further family change. Attention to power relations within and beyond the family and to the social implications of family transformation. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 132The Sociology of Gender (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of biological, psychological, cultural and structural conditions underlying the status and roles of men and women in contemporary society, drawing on a historical and comparative perspective. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 133Sexual Stratification and Politics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of origins, dynamics, and social implications of sexual stratification. Examination of classical and contemporary theorists such as Engels, Freud, J.S. Mill, de Beauvoir, Juliet Mitchell, D. Dinnerstein. Attention to selected issues in social movements for and against sexual equality. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 134Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Asian American, Black, Chicano, and Native American family life in comparative historical perspective. Family structure and gender roles are considered in relation to socio-historical dynamics. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 135Social Relationships (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Social and cultural factors influencing friendships and intimate relationships. Topics include relationship development, relationship maintenance, and relationship loss. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 137African American Society and Culture 1790 to 1990 (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Political and social transformations of African American communities between 1790 and 1990, as seen through film, literature, and music. Topics include: Black consciousness, Afro-Slave culture, The Harlem Renaissance, and contemporary Hip Hop. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 138Economic Sociology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Overview of the rapidly growing field of economic sociology. Focus on variations in the ways that markets are organized. The relationship between individual and collective rationality will also be emphasized. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 139Corporations and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Study of the history and power of the modern corporation; corporate organization; politics, the state, and the corporation; labor unions and the labor process; competition, regulation and international markets; the multinational and conglomerate corporation; and mass markets and consumerism. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 140Social Stratification (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Systems of social ranking, theories of stratification; power, prestige, culture, and styles of life of various social classes; social mobility and its consequences for social structure. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 141Industrialization and Social Change (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Selected technological and social factors. Preconditions of economic development and industrialization. Social, political, and cultural issues at various levels of economic development. Major historical differences and major current trends. Emphasis either on highly industrialized countries or on less developed countries. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 143AUrban Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Theories of city origins. Analysis of the historic process of urbanization and of varying city types. Comparison of American and European experience of metropolitanization,counterurbanization,and neighborhood change. Consideration of competing theories of urban growth and change and competing visions of the urban future. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 143BSociology of City Life (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Critical dissection of the loss of community issue. Analysis of the organization of primary ties in the city, of the culture of urban public life and of the learning of city skills. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 144Agriculture and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Development of agriculture as a major enterprise in modern society with the concomitant reduction in the labor force and family farms. Analysis of issues including mechanization, migrant labor, corporate farming, and public resource policy. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 145ASociology of Third World Development (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001; Upper division standing. Introduction to theories and contemporary issues in the sociology of development. Topics such as urbanization, rural/agrarian change, class, status groups, international division of labor, sectoral shifts, international capital, informal economy, gender, and political processes are analyzed within a comparative-historical framework. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 145ASociology of Third World Development (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001; Upper division standing. Introduction to theories and contemporary issues in the sociology of development. Topics such as urbanization, rural/agrarian change, class, status groups, international division of labor, sectoral shifts, international capital, informal economy, gender, and political processes are analyzed within a comparative-historical framework. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
SOC 145BGender and Rural Development in the Third World (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Political-economic analysis of women and work during the process of socioeconomic change in the world with particular attention to the family/household context. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 146Sociology of Religion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Relationship between social structures and religions. The social setting of the major world religions. Religious innovators and institutionalization (churches, sects, cults). Secularization in the modern world and the rise of secular ideologies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 147Sociological Perspectives on East Asia (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Sociological theories and concepts applied toward understanding East Asian society. Emphasis on the political structure, stratification, and economy in China and Japan. Analysis of historical and contemporary similarities and differences. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 148Collective Behavior (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Study of behavior of human crowds and masses in extraordinary circumstances, including crowd panics, mass scares, collective protests, riots, revolutionary situations, ecstatic and revivalist gatherings, crazes, fads, and fashions. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 149Religion and American Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Historical, contemporary survey of religious traditions and organizations and their relation to U.S. social and cultural patterns. Civil religion, religious pluralism, minority and deviant communities, religious migration, U.S. religion as a social institution, and religion, politics, and social stratification. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 150Criminology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Sociological analysis of criminal behavior in relation to social structure and the criminalization process. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 151The Criminal Justice System (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Sociological analysis of the different components of the criminal justice system including the emergence and interpretation of criminal laws, the contemporary roles and functions of the police, criminal courts and correctional institutions. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 152Juvenile Delinquency (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Study of juvenile delinquency in relation to the family, peer groups, community, and institutional structures. Consideration of processing of the delinquent by formal agencies of control. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 153The Sociology of Childhood (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Contemporary childhood in historical, cross-cultural, and global perspectives. Examine changes in understanding of the nature of childhood and "best interests of the child" by class, race, gender, geographic region, and historical period. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 154Health and Illness (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Theoretical tools for understanding the social determinants of health and health care, including such topics as health policy, social sources of illness, social construction of illness, medicalization, social disparities in health, and the illness experience. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 155Sociology of Law (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Law considered as social control; relation of legal institutions to society as affecting judicial decision making and administration of justice. Lawyers as an occupational group. Legal reform. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 156Social Movements (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of several aspects of social movements: mobilization, forms of organization, ideology, recruitment, leadership, strategies and tactics, development, effects. Frequent use of sound and film materials. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 157Social Conflict (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of the causes, dynamics, and regulation of social conflict within and between various kinds of social groupings with particular reference to nonviolent methods of waging and regulating conflict. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 158Women's Social Movements in Latin America (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Contemporary women's social movements in Latin America, focusing on Honduras, El Salvador, Brazil, and Nicaragua. Examination of exploitation and oppression in Latin America. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 159Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Historical and contemporary overview of employment, work, and occupations in American society. Study of authority and power relations, labor markets, control systems, stratification, and corporate structures, and how these factors shape work in diverse or organizational and employment setting. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 160Sociology of the Environment (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Production, consumption, and urban expansion. Basic social logics surrounding current problems of resource scarcity (environmental extractions) and excess wastes (environmental additions). Ways that society can change and re-organize itself to become more environmentally conscious and hence ecologically sustainable. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 161The Civil Justice System (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Empirical studies of the different aspects of the civil justice system in the United States and Global Society including the litigation, juries, civil rights, and international laws relating to trade, the environment, and human rights. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 162Society, Culture, and Health (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, SOC 003, or SOC 006 recommended. Analysis of how socio-cultural factors shape illness experience. Evaluation of how certain conditions come to be understood as health conditions; illness identities and biographies; doctor-patient interactions; biomedical cultures; and how race, ethnicity, and gender shape health practices. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 163Population Health: Social Determinants and Disparities in Health (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, SOC 003, or SOC 006 recommended. Survey of the social determinants and disparities in health: measurement of population health; health transitions and global disparities; domestic disparities in health by class, race/ethnicity, nativity, gender, and sexual orientation; social determinants including social support, social stress, neighborhoods, and policy. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 164Health Policy and Politics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, SOC 003, or SOC 006 recommended. Introduction to health policy and politics, including health care access and delivery, and policies related to health inequalities, the social determinants of illness and health behaviors. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 170Population (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Introduction to the study of human population, including theories and statistical measures; social causes and consequences of population trends; changes in population structure; geographical distribution, migration, sociopsychological factors affecting fertility. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 171Sociology of Violence and Inequality (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. How systems of social inequality organize the practice of violence. Definitions of violence and issues affecting the social capacity for violence. Analysis and comparison of different forms of violence associated with race, class, gender relations and social organization. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 172Ideology of Class, Race and Gender (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Examination of popular belief systems that accompany relations between social classes, whites and blacks, and men and women in the United States. How do dominant groups attempt to justify each relationship, and is there ideological conflict or consensus between groups. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 173Sociology Through Literature (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Introduction to analysis of literature as sociological data. Reading of numerous works on American and other societies by authors such as Steinbeck, Lewis, Dreiser, Schulberg, Orwell, etc. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 174American Jewish Identities and Communities (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Sociology of Jewish life, analyzing challenges to Jewish identity and community in the diaspora. Diversity within the Jewish community, Americanization, women, new immigrants, post-Holocaust Jewish identity, and LGBT Jews. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 175Mass Communication (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Examines the relationship between the media and social structures. History of mediastate relations. Media as reflector and shaper of values. Emphasis on current European and Marxist and pluralist theories rather than on content analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 176Sociology of Knowledge, Science, and Scientific Knowledge (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Social, cultural, and historical dimensions of knowledge, especially scientific knowledge. Problems, methods, and theory in sociology of scientific knowledge. Laboratory and historical case studies. Scientific and technical knowledge in institutional and organizational contexts. (Same course as STS 176.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 178Punishment and Corrections (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, 002, or 003 recommended. Origins, characteristics, and consequences of various sanctions and punishment regimes including fines, banishment, incarceration, deportation, and execution. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2017 Spring Quarter.
SOC 180AComplex Organizations (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Develops a sociological approach to organizations theory. Designed to introduce sociological concepts, address the alternative psychological and economic models, and involve students in the practice of organizational analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 180BComplex Organizations (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Builds on concepts and skills developed in course 180A. Deals with the issues of organizational decision making, design, and survival. Emphasis on relations between organizations and the effects of those relations in both the public and private sectors. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 181Social Change Organization (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Analysis of organizations with social change and improvement goals and programs, emphasizing voluntary associations and grassroots citizen groups. Topics treated include formation, decision making and leadership, strategies and tactics, factionalism and coalitions, effectiveness. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 182Utopian Communal Groups and Movements (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Formations, structures, and social life of historical and contemporary countercultural, utopian, dystopian, intentional, and religious communal settlements and movements, including comparison with other small settlement forms such as monasteries, villages, neighborhoods, encampments, and communities. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 183Comparative Organizations (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002 or SOC 003 recommended; SOC 180A recommended. Examination of the economic, cultural, and political organization of major industrial and developing nations. Discussion of patterns and practices, alternative theoretical models of explanation, and case studies of organizations. Societies may include Japan, Germany, Egypt, China, and the U.S. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 185Social Policy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Examination of social policies that affect the well-being of individuals, families and groups, including such policies as old-age pensions, health insurance, and aid to the poor. Students may not take both SOC 185 and SOC 185Y for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 185YSocial Policy (Hybrid Version) (4) Active
Web Virtual Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Examination of social policies that affect the well-being of individuals, families and groups, including such policies as old-age pensions, health insurance, and aid to the poor. Students may not take both SOC 185 and SOC 185Y for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 188Markets, Culture and Inequality in China (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Economic and political systems and patterns of social interaction and inequality in China. State and corporate structures and practices, market and consumer behaviors, social mobility and stratification, protest and resistance. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 189Social Science Writing (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. Improved analytic writing and methods for reporting social science research to a wider public. Sociological analysis of the conditions of good and bad writing. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 190XSeminar in Sociological Analysis (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 100; Upper division standing; SOC 100 (former SOC 165A). Limited enrollment. In-depth examination at an upper division level of a special topic in Sociology. Emphasis on student participation in learning. May not be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 191Workshop in Contemporary Sociological Theory (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Workshop—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 100; SOC 100 (former SOC 165A); senior standing. Workshop in contemporary sociological theory that allows students to explore the uses of theory in empirical inquiry on problems of interest to students. Contemporary theory considered in relation to classical and modern influences, concept formation, theory construction, and explanation. Not open for credit to students who have received credit for SOC 165B. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 192Internship and Research Practicum (2-6) Active
Internship—6-18 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Must have 84 units complete; faculty approval of proposed internship. Supervised internship and study in an agency, organization, or institution; application of sociological concepts to the work experience. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Maximum of four units may be counted toward the major. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
SOC 193Workshop in Field Research (2) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 046A; (SOC 192 (can be concurrent) or SOC 199 (can be concurrent)); SOC 192 or SOC 199 required concurrently for 2.0-4.0 units, senior standing. Overview of the process of collecting, recording, analyzing, and reporting qualitative social data. Emphasis on application of principles; each participant completes an original research project. Not open for credit to students who have completed SOC 194HA. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2001 Fall Quarter.
SOC 194HSpecial Study for Honors Students (1-5) Active
Variable—3-15 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open to Sociology majors of senior standing who qualify for the Honors program. Independent study of a sociological problem involving the writing of an Honors thesis. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: WE. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
SOC 194HASpecial Study for Honors Students (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and admission to the Honors Program. Directed reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under direction of faculty advisor. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Fall Quarter.
SOC 194HBSpecial Study for Honors Students (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and admissions to the Honors Program. Directed reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under direction of faculty advisor. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 1997 Spring Quarter.
SOC 195Special Topics in Sociological Analysis (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001, SOC 002, or SOC 003 recommended. In-depth examination of topics in sociology. Emphasis on student research and writing. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
SOC 197TTutoring in Sociology (1-4) Active
Tutorial—3-12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing; completion of appropriate course with distinction. Activities vary depending on the nature of the course assignment. May include (but not limited to) tutoring on course material, advising on projects and papers, and leading discussion groups. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Must have 84 units complete and faculty approval. Special study. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
SOC 201Social Research (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Comparative survey of sociological inquiry, taught as a practicum. Philosophy of social science; values and research; research agendas and research problem formulations; research process; explanations; interpretation; study design; concept formation, measure, sampling, data acquisition, inference; rhetoric and presentation of findings. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
SOC 206Quantitative Analysis in Sociology (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 106. Survey of the statistical models and methods that serve as a foundation for quantitative research in sociology, with an emphasis on multivariate regression analysis, as well as measurement theory and time series analysis. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 207AMethods of Quantitative Research (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 106; Or the equivalent. Principles of study design, examination of measurement, survey research methods and multivariate analysis. Course will stress actual practice of techniques. Students will carry out quantitative data analysis using packaged computer programs. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s) with instructor approval. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
SOC 208Topics in Advanced Quanitative Methods in Social Science (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 206; Or the equivalent and graduate standing; major graduate students. Analysis of the logic and application of an advanced statistical model; the particular model chosen may vary. Emphasis on the model's assumptions, its strengths and weaknesses, its application for social science inquiry, and the relationship between methods and social theory. May be repeated up to 12 Unit(s). (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Spring Quarter.
SOC 215Economy, Polity, and Society (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open to graduate students in sociology and related disciplines. Course introduces students to topics and selected issues in the related fields of economic and political sociology and political economy. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 220Deviance, Law, and Social Control (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): SOC 120; or Consent of Instructor. Report and discussions of literature on selected forms of deviance in relation to law and formal social control. Agency contacts and exploratory research projects. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 224Sociology of Education (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 206 or equivalent recommended. Restricted to graduate students or consent of instructor. Overview of sociological theories accounting for the form, role, and evolution of educational systems. Emphasis on empirical research on education and social stratification and application to educational policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
SOC 225Cultural Sociology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Explores the varied ways in which culture is understood in the social sciences and the research questions that follow from contrasting viewpoints. The approach is historically informed and focused on changing cultural forms in relation to industrialization and post-modernism. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 226Sociological Social Psychology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced study of the varying approaches, methods, issues and topical concerns of sociological social psychology. Analysis of central and representative historical and contemporary works. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 227Sociology of Reproduction (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Recent social science scholarship in such areas as teenage pregnancy, family planning, abortion, adoption, AIDS, and new reproductive technologies; focus on the current situation in the United States. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 230Ethnic (Race) Relations (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Advanced study of the determinants of ethnic groupings and their interrelationships. Major theme will be the patterns of ethnic stratification and causes of ethnic conflict. Specific focus upon dominance and resistance to dominance. Influence of social science research. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 233Gender, Culture, and Local/Global Transformation (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Focus on critical approach to women and development; analyze local transformations with global connections within specific cultural contexts. Course covers theory, methodological issues, and relationship between theory and practice. (Letter.) Effective: 1998 Fall Quarter.
SOC 234Gender, Family, and Society (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. The major theoretical traditions and concerns in family sociology and sociology of gender. Analysis of selected classical and contemporary works representative of functionalist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist and critical theoretical approaches to these subjects (e.g.,Engels,Parsons,Freud,Horkheimer,Goode,Lasch,Mitchell). Emphasis on macro and historical questions. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 242AMethodologies of Sociohistorical Inquires (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor not required for graduate students in the Social Sciences Division or the Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies Division; required for undergraduates and students from other divisions or colleges. Introduction to comparative and case methodological approaches to sociohistorical inquiry, theoretical and practical issues, and substantive research agendas ranging from study of large-scale social transformations to close microhistories, including research agendas being developed by students in the course. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
SOC 243Urban Society (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Broad overview of the issues and concerns of the field of urban sociology. Special emphasis on the human experience of urban living in contemporary, cross-cultural or historical settings. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 245Developing Societies (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or familiarity with problems of developing societies. Analysis of social and economic problems of developing societies from the standpoint of theory and research on modernization and underdevelopment. Nature of third world dependency and interdependence in the global political economy. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 248Social Movements (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Analysis of current issues in and contributions to the study of collective behavior and social movements; particular focus upon the strategies and tactics of social movements. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 254Sociology of Health and Illness (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Open to graduate or professional students. Sociological perspectives and methods on the study of health and illness. Students select topics for supervised research. Research paper required. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
SOC 255Sociology of Law (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Analysis of the nature of the legal process and its impact on social behavior. Will consider (1) nature and functions of law, (2) the organization and administration of law, and (3) the capacity of law to affect social behavior. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 265AClassical Sociological Theory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduces graduate students to the work of the main classical thinkers in the tradition of social theory, such as Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Freud, G.H. Mead, and Parsons, locating them within the historical,cultural,and philosophical milieu in which their ideas originated. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 265BTheory in Contemporary Sociology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 265A. Explores the uses of theories in contemporary sociology by tracing their connections with classical sociological writings and their relations to broader theoretical concerns of contemporary social thought, with particular emphasis on relevance to the current historical, cultural and social milieu. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 270Social Demography (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 170; or Consent of Instructor. How social institutions affect and are affected by the level and variation of mortality, migration, and fertility. Special emphases on the determinants of fertility-related attitudes and behavior, on less-developed countries, and on contemporary empirical studies. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 280Organizations and Institutions (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Theory of formal organizations and bureaucracy. Methods of research in organizational and institutional studies. Historical and comparative analysis of political, religious, educational, military, and economic structure. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 288Integrative Research Practicum (4) Active
Seminar—6 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 207A; SOC 242A; SOC 292A; Consent of Instructor. Continuing training in field, quantitative, and/or comparative-historical methods. Emphasis on students' research projects and applications of principles related to research design, concept and theory construction causality and interpretation, and data and measurement. Completion of research paper is required. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
SOC 290Seminar (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 292AField Research (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Fieldwork. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Sociology or consent of instructor. Introduction to the logic, methods, and practices of field research, with particular emphasis on the ethnographic tradition of participant observation. Interviewing and other qualitative techniques will also be covered. Students will develop original research projects based on their own fieldwork. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
SOC 293Proseminar in Sociology (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): First-year Sociology graduate students only. Introduction to graduate training in sociology. A seminar designed to introduce students entering graduate work in the department to its ongoing research activities. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 295Special Topics Seminar (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Research topics in Sociology. Specific topic will vary according to faculty interest and student demand. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
SOC 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 299Individual Study (1-12) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 390AThe Teaching of Sociology (2) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing; required for first-time teaching assistants. Practical instruction in teaching methods for qualitative and quantitative courses. Pedagogical issues involved in critical sociological analysis. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 390BThe Teaching of Sociology (2) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Practical instruction in devising course syllabi, lectures and assignments for Associate-Instructors and others interested in college teaching. Discussion of pedagogical methods of teaching qualitative and quantitative courses. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
SOC 466Research Paper Workshop (2) Active
Workshop—1.5 hour(s); Discussion—0.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Master of Arts standing. A workshop to assist advanced graduate students in the preparation of an original research paper. Students present their research papers and discuss issues in theory, research design, data, empirical inference, and verbal and written presentation of a professional research paper. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.