Religious Studies

(College of Letters and Science)

Archana Venkatesan, Ph.D., Chair

Program Office. 213 Sproul Hall; 530-752-1219; http://religions.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://religions.ucdavis.edu/people


(College of Letters and Science)

Archana Venkatesan, Ph.D., Chair

Program Office. 213 Sproul Hall; 530-752-1219; http://religions.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://religions.ucdavis.edu/people

The Major Program

Religion is a major force in human experience. It has shaped the world's history, literature, art, culture, politics, ethics, and economics. In addition to offering courses in all the major religious traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism,) the Religious Studies Program has developed cross-cultural courses dealing with religious symbols, myths, and rituals in written texts, art, theater, and film, and the Internet, as well as, thematic courses dealing with such topics as religion and the body, the rise of fundamentalism, religion and science, religion and ethics, and religion and violence.

The Program. The major introduces students to the academic study of religion. Students can choose from a broad range of courses both in the program itself and in other departments and programs-history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, American studies, classics, and medieval studies. In addition to studying religious thought per se, students in the major can also study the way religion has shaped human behavior in such matters as family life, gender roles, ethics, artistic life, concepts of individual freedom, the pursuit of science, and economics. For some students, Religious Studies is an appropriate second major and combines well with anything from philosophy to international agricultural development, political science, and the physical sciences.

Career Alternatives. Because of the program's focus on developing critical thinking, writing, and reading skills, students who major in Religious Studies are well prepared to enter a variety of careers, including teaching, the health professions, law, business, and government. In an increasingly global society, knowledge of the world's religious traditions and practices has become an essential part of a student's education.

Recommended. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is highly recommended.

Course Equivalents. The major advisors have a list of lower and upper division courses that can be substituted for courses suggested above.

Honors and Honors Program. A student becomes eligible for graduation with honors by meeting the minimum GPA and course requirements established by the College of Letters and Science. Upon successful completion of the additional requirements of the College of Letters and Science Honors Program, individual students may be recommended by the program for graduation with high honors or highest honors on the basis of an evaluation of their academic achievements in the major.

Education Abroad Program. The Religious Studies program encourages students to study in the Summer Abroad program, the Quarter Abroad program, or the Education Abroad program. With the approval of a major advisor, applicable courses taken abroad may be accepted in the major or minor programs.

Teaching Credential Subject Representative. See the Teaching Credential/M.A. Program.

Hebrew. Students interested in Hebrew courses should see http://classics.ucdavis.edu/hebrew.

Human Rights Minor. Students interested in the Human Rights minor should see http://humanrightsminor.ucdavis.edu.

Jewish Studies. Students interested in Jewish Studies should see http://jewishstudies.ucdavis.edu.

Major Advisors. Consult the Program office.

Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 20
(A) Choose one course from the Religious Studies 1 series.
4
(B) Choose four courses from other Religious Studies lower division offerings.
16
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 40
RST 100
Study of Religion: Issues and Methods (Active)
4
or
RST 190
Seminar (Active)
4
Choose nine upper division Religious Studies courses.
36
Four of these courses may be upper division courses related to religion that are offered by other departments and taken with the approval of a Religious Studies advisor.
 
Total: 60

(College of Letters and Science)

Archana Venkatesan, Ph.D., Chair

Program Office. 213 Sproul Hall; 530-752-1219; http://religions.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://religions.ucdavis.edu/people

The Major Program

Religion is a major force in human experience. It has shaped the world's history, literature, art, culture, politics, ethics, and economics. In addition to offering courses in all the major religious traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism,) the Religious Studies Program has developed cross-cultural courses dealing with religious symbols, myths, and rituals in written texts, art, theater, and film, and the Internet, as well as, thematic courses dealing with such topics as religion and the body, the rise of fundamentalism, religion and science, religion and ethics, and religion and violence.

The Program. The major introduces students to the academic study of religion. Students can choose from a broad range of courses both in the program itself and in other departments and programs-history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, American studies, classics, and medieval studies. In addition to studying religious thought per se, students in the major can also study the way religion has shaped human behavior in such matters as family life, gender roles, ethics, artistic life, concepts of individual freedom, the pursuit of science, and economics. For some students, Religious Studies is an appropriate second major and combines well with anything from philosophy to international agricultural development, political science, and the physical sciences.

Career Alternatives. Because of the program's focus on developing critical thinking, writing, and reading skills, students who major in Religious Studies are well prepared to enter a variety of careers, including teaching, the health professions, law, business, and government. In an increasingly global society, knowledge of the world's religious traditions and practices has become an essential part of a student's education.

Recommended. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is highly recommended.

Course Equivalents. The major advisors have a list of lower and upper division courses that can be substituted for courses suggested above.

Honors and Honors Program. A student becomes eligible for graduation with honors by meeting the minimum GPA and course requirements established by the College of Letters and Science. Upon successful completion of the additional requirements of the College of Letters and Science Honors Program, individual students may be recommended by the program for graduation with high honors or highest honors on the basis of an evaluation of their academic achievements in the major.

Education Abroad Program. The Religious Studies program encourages students to study in the Summer Abroad program, the Quarter Abroad program, or the Education Abroad program. With the approval of a major advisor, applicable courses taken abroad may be accepted in the major or minor programs.

Teaching Credential Subject Representative. See the Teaching Credential/M.A. Program.

Hebrew. Students interested in Hebrew courses should see http://classics.ucdavis.edu/hebrew.

Human Rights Minor. Students interested in the Human Rights minor should see http://humanrightsminor.ucdavis.edu.

Jewish Studies. Students interested in Jewish Studies should see http://jewishstudies.ucdavis.edu.

Major Advisors. Consult the Program office.

Religious Studies
Units: 20
Choose one lower division course.
4
Choose 16 units of upper division courses.
16
RST 190
Seminar (Active)
4
Some substitutions from other departments or programs allowed with consent of advisor.
 
Total: 20
Courses in RST:
RST 001Survey of Religion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Basic concepts introduced through readings of the primary religious literature. Discussion of central ideas (creation, history, law, prophecy, suffering, mysticism, asceticism, karma, reincarnation, moksha, etc.); readings from the Bible, Bhagavad Gita, the Koran, selections from Plato and early Buddhist writings. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, OL, VL, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 001APilgrimage (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on the theme of pilgrimage in different religious traditions. Not open to students who have taken RST 003A. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 001BDeath and Afterlife (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on the theme of death and the afterlife in different religious traditions. Not open to students who have taken RST 003B. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 001CSacrifice (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on the theme of sacrifice in different religious traditions. Not open to students who have taken RST 003C. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 001DConversion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on the theme of conversion in different religious traditions. Not open to students who have taken RST 003D. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 001EFundamentalism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on the idea of fundamentalism in different religious traditions. No credit given to students that have taken RST 003E. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, DD, OL, SS, WE. Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
RST 001FReligion Today (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on different religious traditions in the contemporary world. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, DD, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 001GMyth, Ritual, and Symbolism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Not open to students who have taken and received unit credit for course 2. Myths, rituals and religious symbols found in a variety of religious traditions including examples from ancient and contemporary religious life. Variety of religious phenomena; validity of different approaches to the study of religion. Not open to students who have taken and received unit credit for RST 002. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2009 Fall Quarter.
RST 001HSex, Marriage, and Divorce in Medieval and Modern Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Methods used in the study of religion, focusing on a particular theme in a number of religious traditions. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Winter Quarter.
RST 001JMusic, Voice, and the Word (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Exploration of relation between religion and musical traditions in various cultures. Investigation of ways music, vocal performance and sound production reflect and shape modern religious sensibilities. Special attention to gender, ethnicity, race, class, nationalism, secularism and mass media. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC. Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
RST 005Comparative Religion (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). Comparative Religion based on rotating topics such as Dreams and Revelations, Evil, Prophecy, Salvation, and Crime and Punishment. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
RST 006Introduction to Health Sciences and the Humanities (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Humanities in the health sciences focusing on illness, the practice of medicine, and the role of culture in biomedical research. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
RST 010Contemporary Ethical Issues (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). Presents challenging, contemporary ethical issues from a multi-cultural perspective. Rotating topics will include Ethical Eating, Capital Punishment, Euthanasia, Poverty, and Animal Rights. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
RST 010AContemporary Ethical Issues (2) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): RST 010 (can be concurrent); RST 010 required concurrently; GE topical breadth and diversity credit only with concurrent enrollment in RST 010. Restricted to students enrolled in course 10. Discussion of the readings assigned for course 10 and completion of a major research paper. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
RST 011Ethical Eating (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the complex and varied ethical, religious, and cultural meanings that food has had across the centuries and globe. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 012The Emergence of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). History of religion in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean, from the Persian period through the rise of Islam. Emphasis on historical and social contexts of the formation of new traditions, in particular Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Winter Quarter.
RST 015YReading War/Fighting War (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Web Electronic Discussion—1 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Introduction to both classic religious texts about war and a set of actual scenarios drawn from the experience and training of soldiers in recent military conflicts. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 021Hebrew Scriptures (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion. Selected texts from the Hebrew Scriptures (GenesisII Chronicles) and review of modern scholarship on the texts from a variety of perspectives (historical, literary, sociological, psychological). Course work is based on an English translation and no knowledge of Hebrew is required. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2013 Spring Quarter.
RST 021The Bible and Its Interpreters (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament): key narratives and themes (creation, flood, prophecy, justice, sexuality, etc.); origins in Ancient Israel; diverse ways it has been interpreted in Jewish and Christian communities. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
RST 023Introduction to Judaism (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Introduction to the study of religion using examples from the rituals, art and holy texts of Judaism. No prior knowledge of either Judaism or the study of religion is necessary. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 030Religions of South Asia (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to South Asian religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Jainism and Sikhism. Traces historical developments from Vedic texts and their ascetic reformulation by sages such as Yajnavalkya, Siddhartha Gautama, and Mahavira into our global present. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 040New Testament (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). New Testament literature from critical, historical, and theological perspectives. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 042Religion and Science Fiction (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Representations of actual and fictional religious movements in science fiction and fantasy writing and film. Examination of: the characteristics of religion and religiosity in fictional religious movements; the relationship between religion, science, and technology in modern speculative fiction. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 045Christianity (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion. Major concepts and practices in the Christian tradition. Survey of the history of Christianity and Christian expansion from antiquity to modern times. Course pays particular attention to Christianity in China, India, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
RST 060Introduction to Islam (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to topics central to the Islamic tradition. Muhammad, the Qur'an, Islamic law, theology, philosophy, cosmology, worship, and mysticism. Race and gender in Islam, Islamic revival, and varying experiences of Islam in different historical and cultural settings. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 065CThe Qur'an and Its Interpretation (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. The Qur'an, its history, its various functions in the lives of Muslims, and its different interpretations. Quranic themes such as God and humankind, nature and revelation, eschatology and Satan. Islam and other religions; women, gender, and sexuality. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
RST 066The Song of God: The Bhagavad Gita (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The Bhagavad Gita, its history and reception, and its significance in the lives of Hindus. Themes explored include Hindu theories of god, self, war, peace, duty, and action. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, WC, WE. Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
RST 067Modern Hinduism (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Historical survey of modern Hinduism from the early nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Rammohun Roy, Sir William Jones, and Mahatma Gandhi, nationalism, post-colonialism and diasporic religion. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2011 Winter Quarter.
RST 068Hinduism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Hindu tradition from ancient to modern times. Multiplicity of religious forms within Hinduism with mention of Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism and their relation to the mainstream of Hindu religion. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2002 Fall Quarter.
RST 069Introduction to Hindu Mythology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Survey of the major narrative traditions within Hinduism, including epic literature and local stories in oral, textual, visual and performative forms. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 070Religion and Language (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Basic toolkit for studying religious discourse in a variety of traditions. Concentration on the sacred and profane, the wondrous and ordinary, and the mystical and reasonable. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 075Introduction to Chinese Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Introduction to Chinese philosophy from classical pre-modern times; emphasis on basic concepts and their impact on social conduct; the Age of Philosophers, the Han synthesis, the medieval Buddhist contribution. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Summer Session 2.
RST 080Religion, Gender, Sexuality (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Constructions of gender and sexuality within one or more religious traditions, pre-modern and modern. Emphasis on the interaction between religious, medical, and ethical definitions of the human body and sexual behavior. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2009 Winter Quarter.
RST 098Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Primarily for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 099Special Study for Lower Division Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 100Study of Religion: Issues and Methods (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Principal issues and methods of Religious Studies and associated fields. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 102Christian Origins (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Development of Christianity from the end of the first century through the major controversies of the fifth century. Emphasis on the relationship between the new religious movement and the Roman Empire, and issues of early Christian identity and diversity. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 103Medieval and Byzantine Christianity (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Christianity in Europe and the Near East from the year 600 to 1450. Focus on the development of Catholic and Orthodox traditions in ritual, art, and thought, with attention to interactions between regional groups, and Christian interaction with Islam. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 104Christianity 1450-1700 (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. History of Reformation conflicts over the authority of scripture, the nature of man and the universe, and the basis of morality with the goal of understanding how these conflicts laid the foundation for the modern world. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Quarter.
RST 105Christianity and Modernity, 1700-1920 (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Reaction of Christian critics and apologists to the profound cultural and scientific transformations resulting from the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the advent of the modern critical study of religion. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Spring Quarter.
RST 106Christianity in the Contemporary World (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Christianity in the 20th and 21st centuries. Relationship of Christianity to globalization, industrialization, mass media, and the contemporary secular state. Focus on Christianity in America and developing nations, and on the relationship of established Christian institutions to new Christian movements. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Spring Quarter.
RST 110Life, Meaning and Identity (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing. Study of religious lives, the quest for meaning and for personal identity; how religions frame the problems of life; how cultural and personal crises affect youthful identity; the nature and structure of dreams, myths, and ideals. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 111Persuasion and Conviction in Religious Tradition (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Term Paper. Selected topics in religious argument. Familiarizes students with the discourse structures of religious persuasion and enables them to perform analysis of such texts. Covers argument styles and structures used in ethics, theology, and preaching. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, OL, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
RST 115Mysticism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One lower division Religious Studies course. Historical and descriptive analysis of selected key figures in mystical traditions and readings of representative mystical texts. Analytic term paper. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 120Religion, Magic and Science (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Religion, magic, and science from the middle ages to the present. Contrast between modern scientific methodology and religious and magical thinking. (Same course as STS 120.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2005 Fall Quarter.
RST 122Studies in Biblical Texts (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 021. Study of a book from the Prophets or writings from critical, historical, and religious perspectives. May be repeated once for credit in different subject area. May be repeated up to 1 Time(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 123Sex and Gender in the Bible (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Gender and sexuality in the Bible and its interpretation in Judaism and Christianity. Femininity and masculinity; gender roles; homosexuality; sexual violence. Historical origins in the ancient world; influence on contemporary views. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
RST 124Topics in Judaism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 023; RST 021. Examination of selected aspects of Jewish life, religion, or literature. Potential topics include: Jewish Perspectives on Jesus; The Golem: History and Legend; Sexuality and Gender in Late Antique Judaism and Early Christianity. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 125Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocrypha, and Pseudepigrapha (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 021; or Consent of Instructor. Survey of the Dead Sea Scrolls, apocryphal and pseudepigraphical writings of Judaism and Christianity and their historical, social, and religious importance. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 126The Formation of the Rabbinic Tradition (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 021; RST 023; (RST 040 or RST 125). Survey of the classical rabbinic Jewish texts such as the Talmud and of the social and historical contexts of their production in Palestine and Babylonia. (Letter.) GE credit: WC. Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
RST 130Topics in Religious Studies (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 001 or RST 002 or RST 003A or RST 003B or RST 003C; or Consent of Instructor. One course. Thematic study of a phenomenon in more than one religious tradition or of the relationship between religion and another cultural phenomenon. Topics may include archeology and the Bible, women and religion, religion and violence. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) GE credit: WC, WE. Effective: 2002 Fall Quarter.
RST 131Genocide (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing. Comparative and critical study of the modern phenomenon of genocide from religious, ethical and historical perspectives. (Same course as Human Rights 131.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Spring Quarter.
RST 131Genocide (4) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing. Comparative and critical study of the modern phenomenon of genocide from religious, ethical and historical perspectives. (Same course as Human Rights 131.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
RST 132Topics in Mediterranean Ancient Religion (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 021; RST 040; or Consent of Instructor. Thematic study of specific sociological, literary or theological theme across the religious traditions of the ancient Mediterranean/Near East: Greek and Roman religions, Judaism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, etc. Topics may include creation, sacrifice, priesthoods, prophecies, holy books, the afterlife. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s) when topic differs. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
RST 134Human Rights (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the origins, evolution, denial and protection of Human Rights. No credit for students who have completed course 90. (Same course as HMR 134.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Spring Quarter.
RST 134Human Rights (4) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the origins, evolution, denial and protection of Human Rights. No credit for students who have completed course 90. (Same course as Human Rights 134.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
RST 135The Bible and Film (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Term Paper; Film Viewing—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): HUM 010 recommended. Examination of the uses of the Judeo-Christian Scriptures in film. Topics include dramatic depictions of biblical stories, the tension between science and religion, allegorical treatments of biblical themes, and the problems of religious conviction. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Winter Quarter.
RST 138Human Rights, Gender, and Sexuality (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Gender and sexuality in the context of human rights. Topics include women's participation in the public sphere, the right to change gender, the right for family privacy, and the right to marriage. (Same course as Human Rights 138.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
RST 138Human Rights, Gender, and Sexuality (4) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Gender and sexuality in the context of human rights. Topics include women's participation in the public sphere, the right to change gender, the right for family privacy, and the right to marriage. (Same course as Human Rights 138.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2019 Spring Quarter.
RST 140Christian Theology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Historical and systematic introduction to Christian doctrine, with attention to divergent traditions and the problem of orthodoxy and heresy. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 141ANew Testament Literature: Synoptic Gospels (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Life and thought of the early Church as reflected by the Synoptic Tradition; Matthew, Mark, Luke and Acts. Offered every third year to alternate with 141B, 141C. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 141BNew Testament Literature: John (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Life and thought of the early Church as reflected by the Johannine Tradition; the Gospel and letters of John. Offered every third year to alternate with courses 141A and 141C. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 141CNew Testament Literature: Paul (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Life and thought of the early Church as reflected by the Pauline tradition. The letters of Paul. Offered every third year to alternate with 141A, 141B. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 143New Testament Apocrypha (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Extra-canonical Christian writings and their reception, from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on the importance of New Testament figures both as literary characters and as authors within different Christian traditions. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 144History of the Bible (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 021 or RST 040. History of the formation of the Christian biblical canon, with emphasis on differences between Christian traditions; survey of translations and adaptations of biblical narrative in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, as well as in contemporary culture. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 145Contemporary American Religion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): RST 040 and HIS 017B recommended. Examination of several major movements and phenomena in twentieth-century American religion. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 150Religious Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper/Discussion. Prerequisite(s): RST 010 recommended. Study of the religious bases of ethics through examination of ethical problems that arise in different religious cultures around the world and in nations where multiple religious cultures face similar issues. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
RST 152Justice, Equity, and Privacy in Medical Humanities (4) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Global issues of justice, equity, and fairness in healthcare and biomedical research. Emphasis on issues of race, gender, paternalism, and genetic privacy. Course texts include scholarly articles, fiction, and film. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
RST 154The Hindu Temple (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Comparative history of architecture and symbolism of the Hindu Temple in India, Southeast Asia and the United States. Attention to the temple as expression of religious knowledge, political authority, and cultural heritage through the lens of colonialism and postcolonialism. (Same course as AHI 154.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
RST 156Religion and the Performing Arts in India (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 030; RST 068; or Consent of Instructor. Survey of religion and performing arts in India. Emphasis on the influence of colonialism, nationalism, and regionalism on the history of Indian performing arts. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Winter Quarter.
RST 157Hindu Women and Goddesses (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Hindu goddesses and the religious lives of Hindu women in India and the diaspora. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2010 Fall Quarter.
RST 158The Ramayana (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Exploration of the Indian epic, Ramayana, through the lens of literature, performance, and visual art. Emphasis on the text's diversity and its contemporary global relevance. Topics include Ramayanas in Southeast Asia, and in various South Asian diaspora communities. (Same course as COM 156.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
RST 160Introduction to Islamic Thought (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): RST 060 recommended. The development of Islamic thought from the first centuries of Islam to the eighteenth century. Theology, philosophy, ethics, Sufism, historiography, political theory, fundamentalism, al-Farabi, al-Ghazzali, Ibn Rushd, Tusi, Ibn al-Arabi, Rumi, Molla Sadra, Ibn Khaldun, Ibn Abd al-Wahhab. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
RST 161Modern Islam (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Response of Islam to modernity: secularism, reformism, fundamentalism. Islam and imperialism, women, media and immigration. Islamic modernism, political Islam, Islam in Europe and America. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
RST 161BModern Islam: Authority and Tradition In Process (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Survey of Islamic thought, social organization, politics from eighteenth century through present. Focus on changing notations of moral authority and tradition. Concentration on Middle East and South Asia with sustained treatment of North American engagements with the Islamic world. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Spring Quarter.
RST 162Introduction to Islamic Law (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): RST 060 recommended. The development of Islamic law in the formative centuries of Islam, ca. 600-1000, as well as its adaptation to changing economic, social, and political conditions in subsequent periods. Legal schools, legal theory, the Shari'a, reformist movements, human rights. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
RST 163Social Life of Islam (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): RST 060 or HIS 006 recommended. Introduction to culture and social life in Muslim societies. Focus on the plurality of traditions in Muslim faith, reason, and everyday practice. Special attention to Muslim rituals, ethical values, verbal genres, family life, sexuality and veiling, and youth culture. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, OL, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
RST 165Islam in Asia (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Islam as a lived religion in the Indian sub-continent, Central Asia, China, and Southeast Asia. Emphasis is on primary sources studied comparatively and historically. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Winter Quarter.
RST 166Religion and Media in the Arab World (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Exploration of the role and experience of media technologies in the Arab world. Study of digital and electronic media as well as alternative media practices. Investigation of new trends in political activism and identity formation. (Same course as MSA 131C.) (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
RST 167Iraq (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Origins, causes and ethical challenges of conditions in Iraq; larger historical, cultural and ethical dimensions of mass violence, war, liberation, neocolonialism, terrorism and resistance. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Spring Quarter.
RST 170Buddhism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Buddhism in its pan-Asian manifestations, from its beginning in India to its development in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, Central Asia, China and Japan; teachings and practices, socio-political and cultural impact. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC. Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
RST 172Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Doctrines and methods of the Ch'an Buddhism, both ancient and modern. Review of ritual techniques, including meditation. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
RST 175AChinese Intellectual Traditions: Daoist Traditions (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): A course in Chinese history recommended. English-language survey of key Daoist texts and scholarship. Topics include Daoist concepts of the cosmos, the natural world, scripture, the body, and immortality; Daoist divinities; Daoism and the state. (Same course as CHN 100A.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
RST 189Senior Colloquium (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Primarily for seniors in Religious Studies. Discussion in depth of a problem in religion which requires the methods of several disciplines and is important in the encounter between religions. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 190Seminar (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Required of all Religious Studies majors. Allows majors to integrate their disciplined study of the field. Emphasis on current scholarly debate about the methods for analyzing and comparing diverse religious traditions. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 194HASpecial Study for Honors Students (1-5) Active
Independent Study. Open only to majors of senior standing who qualify for honors program. Guided research, under the direction of a faculty member approved by the Program Director, leading to a senior honors thesis on a religious studies topic. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 194HBSpecial Study for Honors Students (1-5) Active
Independent Study. Open only to majors of senior standing who qualify for honors program. Guided research, under the direction of a faculty member approved by the Program Director, leading to a senior honors thesis on a religious studies topic. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Upper division standing. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
RST 201Methods and Issues in Religious Studies (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Focuses on controversies in the study of comparative religion. How is religion best defined? Are there methods unique to the study of religion? What does the study of religion contribute to the study of society in general? May be repeated up to 2 Time(s) the content is substantially different. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Spring Quarter.
RST 205Religion and Media (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Many communities are finding global media technologies useful for religious practice. This course examines how religious revitalization is historically situated. A phenomenological approach will enable students to situate media and religion within the social and material world of practitioners. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Winter Quarter.
RST 210Religion and Postcoloniality, or Savages, Civilization, and Spirituality (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. This course examines relations between religion and colonialisms. Using specific historical situations it explores some of our thorniest theoretical problems. Students acquire a solid understanding of postcolonial theory and the historical tools to critically engage religion in the present. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
RST 212Religion and Violence (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Comparative and critical study of the ideological, cultural, and theological relationship between forms of violence and religion and religious practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
RST 215Topics in the History of Christianity (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Selected topics in the history of Christianity. Intended for graduate students seeking to do advanced work in the study of Christianity. May cover issues in Christian thought from antiquity, the middle ages, the early modern or modern period. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Quarter.
RST 299Directed Research (1-12) Active
Variable. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
RST 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2009 Winter Quarter.