Physics

(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty


(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty

The Major Program

From the smallest subatomic particles to atoms, molecules, stars, and galaxies, the study of physics is the study of what makes the universe work. Knowledge gained using atomic-scale microscopes and high-energy particle accelerators and nuclear reactors teaches us not only what holds the atomic nucleus together but also how proteins function and why stars shine.

The Program. The Department of Physics offers a Bachelor of Arts in Physics and two Bachelor of Science degree programs: in Physics (which also offers an emphasis in Astrophysics), and in Applied Physics. The A.B. degree provides a broad coverage of classical and modern physics while permitting a broader liberal arts education than is possible with the other two programs. The B.S. degree in either Physics or Applied Physics should be followed by the student who plans to enter physics as a profession, and also provides excellent training for a wide variety of technical career options. The B.S. in Applied Physics provides the student with a solid introduction to a particular applied physics specialty. For the student who plans to enter the job market upon completing a B.S. degree, the applied physics orientation would be an asset. Either B.S. program provides a solid foundation in physics for the student interested in graduate work in either pure or applied physics.

Career Alternatives. Careers in physics and applied physics include research and development, either in universities, government laboratories, or industry; teaching in high schools, junior colleges, and universities; management and administration in industrial laboratories and in government agencies; and in production and sales in industry. A major in physics also provides a strong base for graduate-level work in such interdisciplinary areas as chemical physics, biophysics and medical physics, geophysics and environmental physics, astrophysics and astronomy, computer science, and materials science.

Program Variance. Similar courses from other departments may be substituted for courses in the depth subject matter requirements by obtaining prior written permission from the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Chairperson.

Graduate Study. The Department of Physics offers programs of study and research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Further information regarding requirements for these three degrees, graduate research, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships may be obtained by writing to the Chairperson, Department of Physics, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Astronomy. In addition to the introductory Astronomy courses listed, upper division and graduate courses in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology are listed under Physics.

Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 45-51
PHY 009A
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009B
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009C
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009D
Modern Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 009HA
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HB
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HC
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HD
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HE
Honors Physics (Active)
5
MAT 021A
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021B
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021C
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021D
Vector Analysis (Active)
4
MAT 022A
Linear Algebra (Active)
3
MAT 022B
Differential Equations (Active)
3
PHY 080
Experimental Techniques (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 36-40
PHY 104A
Introductory Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
PHY 105A
Analytical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 110A
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 110B
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 112
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 115A
Foundation of Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 122A
Advanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 122B
Advanced Laboratory in Particle Physics (Active)
4
Choose at least one:
4
PHY 129A
Introduction to Nuclear Physics (Active)
4
PHY 130A
Elementary Particle Physics (Active)
4
PHY 140A
Introduction to Solid State Physics (Active)
4
PHY 151
Stellar Structure and Evolution (Active)
4
PHY 152
Galactic Structure and the Interstellar Medium (Active)
4
PHY 153
Extragalactic Astrophysics (Active)
4
PHY 102
Computational Laboratory in Physics (Active)
0-1
Choose at least one additional fixed-unit upper division Physics course; excluding PHY 160.
3-4
Total: 81-91

(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty

The Major Program

From the smallest subatomic particles to atoms, molecules, stars, and galaxies, the study of physics is the study of what makes the universe work. Knowledge gained using atomic-scale microscopes and high-energy particle accelerators and nuclear reactors teaches us not only what holds the atomic nucleus together but also how proteins function and why stars shine.

The Program. The Department of Physics offers a Bachelor of Arts in Physics and two Bachelor of Science degree programs: in Physics (which also offers an emphasis in Astrophysics), and in Applied Physics. The A.B. degree provides a broad coverage of classical and modern physics while permitting a broader liberal arts education than is possible with the other two programs. The B.S. degree in either Physics or Applied Physics should be followed by the student who plans to enter physics as a profession, and also provides excellent training for a wide variety of technical career options. The B.S. in Applied Physics provides the student with a solid introduction to a particular applied physics specialty. For the student who plans to enter the job market upon completing a B.S. degree, the applied physics orientation would be an asset. Either B.S. program provides a solid foundation in physics for the student interested in graduate work in either pure or applied physics.

Career Alternatives. Careers in physics and applied physics include research and development, either in universities, government laboratories, or industry; teaching in high schools, junior colleges, and universities; management and administration in industrial laboratories and in government agencies; and in production and sales in industry. A major in physics also provides a strong base for graduate-level work in such interdisciplinary areas as chemical physics, biophysics and medical physics, geophysics and environmental physics, astrophysics and astronomy, computer science, and materials science.

Program Variance. Similar courses from other departments may be substituted for courses in the depth subject matter requirements by obtaining prior written permission from the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Chairperson.

Graduate Study. The Department of Physics offers programs of study and research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Further information regarding requirements for these three degrees, graduate research, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships may be obtained by writing to the Chairperson, Department of Physics, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Astronomy. In addition to the introductory Astronomy courses listed, upper division and graduate courses in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology are listed under Physics.

Physics
Units: 108-119
Preparatory Subject Matter
49-55
PHY 009A
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009B
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009C
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009D
Modern Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 009HA
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HB
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HC
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HD
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HE
Honors Physics (Active)
5
MAT 021A
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021B
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021C
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021D
Vector Analysis (Active)
4
MAT 022A
Linear Algebra (Active)
3
MAT 022B
Differential Equations (Active)
3
PHY 040
Introduction to Physics Computation (Active)
4
PHY 080
Experimental Techniques (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
59-64
PHY 104A
Introductory Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
PHY 105A
Analytical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 105B
Analytical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 110A
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 110B
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 110C
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 112
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 115A
Foundation of Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 115B
Applications of Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 102
Computational Laboratory in Physics (Active)
1
or
PHY 104B
Computational Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
Laboratory Requirement
4-12
PHY 122A
Advanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 122B
Advanced Laboratory in Particle Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 116A
Electronic Instrumentation (Active)
4
PHY 116B
Electronic Instrumentation (Active)
4
PHY 116C
Introduction to Computer-Based Experiments in Physics (Active)
4
Concentration Courses
12
Two courses from one specialty (General Relativity/Astrophysical Applications, Condensed Matter, or Nuclear/Particle Physics) and one course from a different specialty. Lists of courses in each specialty are available from the department
 
Additional upper division Physics courses excluding PHY160, for a total of 15 upper division Physics courses of three or more units each. With prior departmental approval, one course from mathematics, engineering, or natural science may be used to meet this requirement. May include only one from:
0-9
PHY 194H (Discontinued 1993)
 
PHY 195
Senior Thesis (Active)
5
PHY 198
Directed Group Study (Active)
1-5
PHY 199
Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (Active)
1-5
Astrophysics Emphasis
Units: 108-120
Preparatory Subject Matter
49-55
PHY 009A
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009B
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009C
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009D
Modern Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 009HA
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HB
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HC
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HD
Honors Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009HE
Honors Physics (Active)
5
MAT 021A
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021B
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021C
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021D
Vector Analysis (Active)
4
MAT 022A
Linear Algebra (Active)
3
MAT 022B
Differential Equations (Active)
3
PHY 040
Introduction to Physics Computation (Active)
4
PHY 080
Experimental Techniques (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
59-65
PHY 104A
Introductory Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
PHY 105A
Analytical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 108
Optics (Active)
3
PHY 108L
Optics Laboratory (Active)
1
PHY 110A
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 110B
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 112
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 115A
Foundation of Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 115B
Applications of Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 102
Computational Laboratory in Physics (Active)
1
or
PHY 104B
Computational Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
Laboratory Requirement
4
PHY 122A
Advanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 122B
Advanced Laboratory in Particle Physics (Active)
4
or
PHY 157
Astronomy Instrumentation and Data Analysis Laboratory (Active)
4
PHY 151
Stellar Structure and Evolution (Active)
4
PHY 152
Galactic Structure and the Interstellar Medium (Active)
4
PHY 153
Extragalactic Astrophysics (Active)
4
PHY 156
Introduction to Cosmology (Active)
4
Choose two electives:
6-9
PHY 105B
Analytical Mechanics (Active)
4
PHY 110C
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 116A
Electronic Instrumentation (Active)
4
PHY 129A
Introduction to Nuclear Physics (Active)
4
PHY 130A
Elementary Particle Physics (Active)
4
PHY 130B
Elementary Particle Physics (Active)
4
PHY 150
Special Topics in Physics (Active)
4
PHY 154
Astrophysical Applications of Physics (Active)
4
PHY 155
General Relativity (Active)
4
GEL 163
Planetary Geology and Geophysics (Active)
3
May include only one from:
 
PHY 194H (Discontinued 1993)
1
PHY 195
Senior Thesis (Active)
5
PHY 199
Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (Active)
1-5
Recommended
 
AST 025
Introduction to Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Active)
4
Total: 108-120

(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty

Graduate Study. The Department of Physics offers programs of study and research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Further information regarding requirements for these three degrees, graduate research, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships may be obtained by writing to the Chairperson, Department of Physics, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty

Graduate Study. The Department of Physics offers programs of study and research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Further information regarding requirements for these three degrees, graduate research, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships may be obtained by writing to the Chairperson, Department of Physics, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

(College of Letters and Science)

Robert Svoboda, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Lori Lubin, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Administration and Undergraduate Matters)

Rajiv Singh, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the Department (Graduate Matters)

Department Office. 174 Physics Building; 530-752-1500; http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://physics.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty

All courses in the minor have prerequisites equivalent to MAT 021A-021B-021C-021D and 022A-022B and PHY 009A-009B-009C-009D. Students considering the possibility of a minor should consult with a Physics major advisor before beginning course work in the minor program.

Physics
Units: 24
Choose at least six upper division courses in Physics; excluding:
24
PHY 160
Environmental Physics and Society (Active)
3
PHY 197T
Tutoring in Physics and Astronomy (Active)
1-5
PHY 199
Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (Active)
1-5
Total: 24

Physics 001 is a two-quarter sequence requiring some mathematics (trigonometry). Either 001A alone or both quarters may be taken. The sequence is not intended to satisfy entrance requirements of a year of physics for professional schools, but will satisfy requirements of 3 or 6 units of physics.

Physics 007 is a one-year (three-quarter) introductory physics course with laboratory intended for students majoring in the biological sciences. It has a calculus prerequisite. If you don't want a full year of introductory physics, you should take one or two quarters of Physics 1 instead. Read the following information carefully if you are using Physics 007 to complete an introductory course you have already begun.

The sequence of material in Physics 007 is different from that in most traditionally taught introductory physics courses. Physics 007B is most like the first quar­ter or semester of traditionally taught courses which treat classical mechanics. Physics 007C is most like the last quarter or semester which, in traditionally taught courses, treats optics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. The content and sequence of Phys­ics 007A is unlike that of most other traditionally taught courses.

If you have completed one introductory quarter or semester of a traditionally taught physics course and want to continue with Physics 007, you should first take (and will receive full credit for) Physics 007A. Then, either skip 007B, but self-study the last three weeks of material, or take 007B and receive reduced credit. Finally, take 007C for full credit.

If you have taken two quarters of a year-long intro­ductory physics course and have not had extensive work in optics, electricity and magnetism, and mod­ern physics, you should take Physics 007C. In no case should you take Physics 007B without first taking Phys­ics 007A. All other situations should be discussed directly with a Physics 007 instructor.

Students not intending to take the entire sequence should instead take Physics 001.

Physics 009 is a four-quarter sequence using calculus throughout and including laboratory work as an inte­gral component. The course is primarily for students in the physical sciences and engineering.

Physics 009H is a five-quarter honors physics sequence, which may be taken instead of Physics 009. It is intended primarily for first-year students with a strong interest in physics and with advanced place­ment in mathematics to Mathematics 021B. Students who plan to major in physics, and also motivated non-majors, should take Physics 009H instead of Physics 009 if they are ready to begin Mathematics 021B in fall quarter. In course requirements and prerequisites, Physics 009HA-009HE can be substituted for Physics 009A-009D. Students may not switch between the 009H and 009 series beyond 009HA or 009A.

Physics 010 is primarily a concept-oriented one-quarter lecture/discussion course requiring relatively little mathematical background.

Courses in PHY:
PHY 001APrinciples of Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Trigonometry or consent of instructor. Mechanics. Introduction to general principles and analytical methods used in physics with emphasis on applications in applied agricultural and biological sciences and in physical education. Not open to students who have received credit for PHY 007B or PHY 009A. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 001BPrinciples of Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 001A or PHY 009A. Not open for credit to students who have received credit for course 7A, 7B, 7C, 9B, 9C, or 9D. Continuation of course 1A. Heat, optics, electricity, modern physics. Not open for credit to students who have received credit for course 7A, 7B, 7C, 9B, 9C, or 9D. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 007AGeneral Physics (4) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 016B (can be concurrent) or MAT 017B (can be concurrent) or MAT 021B (can be concurrent); Completion or concurrent enrollment in MAT 016B or MAT 017B or MAT 021B. Introduction to general principles and analytical methods used in physics for students majoring in a biological science. Only two units of credit allowed to students who have completed PHY 001B or PHY 009B. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2010 Winter Quarter.
PHY 007BGeneral Physics (4) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 007A. Continuation of course 7A. Only two units of credit allowed to students who have completed course 9A, or 1A. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 007CGeneral Physics (4) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 007B. Continuation of course 7B. Only two units of credit allowed to students who have completed course 9C or 5C. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 009AClassical Physics (5) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—2.5 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 021B; MAT 021M. Introduction to general principles and analytical methods used in physics for physical science and engineering majors. Classical mechanics. Only 2 units of credit for students who have completed 1A or 7B. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 9HA. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHY 009AClassical Physics (5) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—2.5 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 021B or MAT 021M; or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to general principles and analytical methods used in physics for physical science and engineering majors. Classical mechanics. Only 2 units of credit for students who have completed PHY 001A or PHY 007B; not open for credit to students who have completed course PHY 009HA. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2018 Summer Session 1.
PHY 009BClassical Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—2.5 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; MAT 021C; MAT 021D (can be concurrent). Continuation of course 9A. Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, optics. Only two units of credit for students who have completed PHY 007A; not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009HB, PHY 009HC, or ENG 105. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
PHY 009CClassical Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—2.5 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009B; MAT 021D; MAT 022A (can be concurrent). Electricity and magnetism including circuits and Maxwell's equations. Only 3 units of credit for students who have completed PHY 007C; not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009HD. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2005 Winter Quarter.
PHY 009DModern Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009C; MAT 022A; MAT 022B recommended (may be taken concurrently). Not open for credit to students who have completed course 9HB, 9HC, or 9HE. Introduction to physics concepts developed since 1900. Special relativity, quantum mechanics, atoms, molecules, condensed matter, nuclear and particle physics. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 9HB, 9HC, or 9HE. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1999 Spring Quarter.
PHY 009HAHonors Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 021B (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. Classical mechanics. Same material as course 9A in greater depth. For students in physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Only 2 units of credit for students who have completed PHY 007B; not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009A. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2003 Fall Quarter.
PHY 009HBHonors Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009HA or PHY 009A); MAT 021C (can be concurrent). Special relativity, thermal physics. Continuation of course 9HA. Only 2 units of credit for students who have completed PHY 007A; not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009B or PHY 009D. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2004 Winter Quarter.
PHY 009HCHonors Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009HB; MAT 021D (can be concurrent). Waves, sound, optics, quantum physics. Continuation of Physics 9HB. Only 2 units of credit for students who have completed PHY 007C; not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009B or PHY 009D. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2004 Spring Quarter.
PHY 009HDHonors Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009HC; MAT 021D. Electricity and magnetism. Continuation of Physics 9HC. Not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009C. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2003 Fall Quarter.
PHY 009HEHonors Physics (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009HD; MAT 022B (can be concurrent). Application of quantum mechanics. Not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 009D. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2004 Winter Quarter.
PHY 010Topics in Physics for Nonscientists (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): High school algebra. Emphasis varies: survey of basic principles or a deeper exploration of some particular branch. Past topics included black holes, space time, and relativity; physics of music; history and philosophy; energy and the environment; and natural phenomena. No units of credit allowed if taken after any other PHY course. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 010CPhysics of California (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Atmospheric phenomena common in CA, local weather patterns and microclimes. Applications to CA energy, water, and resource management policies. Physics underlying regional sports in CA. Not open for credit to students who have completed any quarter of PHY 009 or PHY 009H, or any upper division PHY course. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHY 010CYPhysics of California (3) Active
Web Virtual Lecture—1 hour(s); Web Electronic Discussion—0.5 hour(s); Discussion—1.5 hour(s). Conceptual understanding of the physics underlying regional sports in CA. Focus on skiing, surfing, and scuba diving. Atmospheric phenomena common in CA, local weather patterns and microclimes, applications to CA energy, and water are also discussed. Not open for credit to students who have completed PHY 010C, any quarter of PHY 09A, PHY 009B, PHY 009C, PHY 009D, PHY 009HA, PHY 009HB, PHY 009HC, PHY 009HD, or PHY 009HE, or any upper division PHY course. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHY 012Visualization in Science (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Production, interpretation, and use of images in physics, astronomy, biology, and chemistry as scientific evidence and for communication of research results. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHY 030Fractals, Chaos and Complexity (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 016A or MAT 021A. Modern ideas about the unifying ideas of fractal geometry, chaos and complexity. Basic theory and applications with examples from physics, earth sciences, mathematics, population dynamics, ecology, history, economics, biology, computer science, art and architecture. (Same course as GEL 030.) (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2010 Winter Quarter.
PHY 040Introduction to Physics Computation (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—4 hour(s). Introduction to programming using C++ with examples from computational physics. Introduction to modern tools used for scientific analysis, including Scientific computing with Python. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2018 Summer Session 2.
PHY 049Supplementary Work in Lower Division Physics (1-3) Active
Variable. Students with partial credit in lower division physics courses may, with consent of instructor, complete the credit under this heading. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
PHY 080Experimental Techniques (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009D or PHY 009HD. Open to Physics and Applied Physics majors only. Experimental techniques. Design of circuits. Data analysis, sources of noise, statistical and systematic uncertainties. Light sources, detection, and measurement in basic optical systems. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
PHY 090XLower Division Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Lower division standing. Limited enrollment. Examination of a special topic in Physics through shared readings, discussions, written assignments, or special activities such as laboratory work. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1998 Fall Quarter.
PHY 098Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Primary for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 099Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 102Computational Laboratory in Physics (1) Active
Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): MAT 021D; ECS 030; (PHY 009D or PHY 009HD); PHY 104A (can be concurrent); MAT 22AB; PHY 104A required concurrently. Introduction to computational physics and to the computational resources in the physics department. Preparation for brief programming assignments required in other upper division physics classes. Not open to students who have completed PHY 104B or PHY 105AL. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2008 Summer Session 1.
PHY 104AIntroductory Methods of Mathematical Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009B C- or better, PHY 009C C- or better, PHY 009D C- or better); (MAT 021D C- or better, MAT 022A C- or better, MAT 022B C- or better); or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to the mathematics used in upper-division physics courses, including applications of vector spaces, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHY 104BComputational Methods of Mathematical Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A C- or better; PHY 105AL; or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to the use of computational techniques to solve the mathematical problems that arise in advanced physics courses, complementing the analytical approaches emphasized in course 104A. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHY 104CIntermediate Methods of Mathematical Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Applications of complex analysis, conditional probability, integral transformations and other advanced topics. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHY 105AAnalytical Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009B C or better, PHY 009C C or better, PHY 009D C or better); (MAT 021D C or better, MAT 022A C or better, MAT 022B C or better); Or consent of department for any of the courses. Principles and applications of Newtonian mechanics; introduction to Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
PHY 105BAnalytical Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A C or better; PHY 105A C or better; Or consent of department for any of the courses. Principles and applications of Newtonian mechanics; introduction to Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
PHY 105CContinuum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A C- or better; PHY 105A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. The continuum hypothesis and limitations, tensors, isotropic constitutive equations, and wave propagation. Applications such as elastic solids,heat flow, aerodynamics, and ocean waves. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2006 Spring Quarter.
PHY 108Optics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ((PHY 009A, PHY 009B, PHY 009C, PHY 009D) or (PHY 007A, PHY 007B, PHY 007C)); (MAT 021A, MAT 021B, MAT 021C, MAT 021D); or Consent of Instructor. The phenomena of diffraction, interference, and polarization of light, with applications to current problems in astrophysics, material science, and atmospheric science. Study of modern optical instrumentation. Open to non-majors. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 108LOptics Laboratory (1) Active
Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 108 (can be concurrent); PHY 108 required concurrently. The laboratory will consist of one major project pursued throughout the quarter, based on modern applications of optical techniques. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 110AElectricity and Magnetism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009B C- or better; PHY 009C C- or better; PHY 009D C- or better; MAT 021D C- or better; MAT 022A C- or better; MAT 022B C- or better; PHY 104A; PHY 105A; Or consent of department. Theory of electrostatics, electromagnetism, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHY 110BElectricity and Magnetism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 110A C- or better; PHY 104A C- or better; Or consent of department. Theory of electrostatics, electromagnetism, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2010 Winter Quarter.
PHY 110CElectricity and Magnetism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 110B C- or better; Or consent of department. Theory of electrostatics, electromagnetism, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2010 Winter Quarter.
PHY 112Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A; Or the equivalent. Introduction to classical and quantum statistical mechanics and their connections with thermodynamics. The theory is developed for the ideal gas model and simple magnetic models and then extended to studies of solids, quantum fluids, and chemical equilibria. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 115AFoundation of Quantum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A C- or better; PHY 105A C- or better; Or consent of department. Introduction to the methods of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic, molecular, solid state, nuclear and elementary particle physics. Extensive problem solving. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHY 115BApplications of Quantum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; Or consent of department. Angular momentum and spin; hydrogen atom and atomic spectra; perturbation theory; scattering theory. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
PHY 116AElectronic Instrumentation (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009C; MAT 022B; or Consent of Instructor. Experimental and theoretical study of important analog electronic circuits. Linear circuits, transmission lines, input impedance, feedback, amplifiers, oscillators, noise. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, VL. Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
PHY 116BElectronic Instrumentation (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009C or PHY 009HD; or Consent of Instructor. Continuation of course 116A. Introduction to the use of digital electronics and microcomputers in experimental physics. Nonlinear electronics, integrated circuits, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters, transducers, actuators. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2008 Spring Quarter.
PHY 116CIntroduction to Computer-Based Experiments in Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009D or PHY 009HD); PHY 116B; MAT 022B; or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to techniques for making physical measurements using computer-based instrumentation. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2004 Spring Quarter.
PHY 122AAdvanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (4) Review all entries Historical
Laboratory—8 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 110B; PHY 115A; PHY 112 (can be concurrent); Or consent of the department. Registration by Permission to Add (PTA) number only; priority given to graduating PHY and APP majors. Experimental techniques and measurements in solid-state physics. Student performs three to six experiments depending on difficulty. Individual work is stressed. Thorough write-ups of the experiments are required. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHY 122AAdvanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (4) Review all entries Active
Laboratory—8 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 110B; PHY 115A; PHY 112 (can be concurrent); PHY 080; Or consent of the department. Registration by Permission to Add (PTA) number only; priority given to graduating PHY and APP majors. Experimental techniques and measurements in solid-state physics. Three-six experiments performed depending on difficulty. Individual work is stressed. Thorough write-ups of the experiments are required. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
PHY 122BAdvanced Laboratory in Particle Physics (4) Review all entries Historical
Laboratory—8 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 110B; PHY 115A; PHY 112 (can be concurrent); Or consent of the department. Registration by Permission to Add (PTA) number only; priority given to graduating PHY and APP majors. Experimental techniques and measurements in nuclear and particle physics. Students perform three to six experiments depending on difficulty. Individual work is stressed. Thorough write-ups of the experiments are required. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHY 122BAdvanced Laboratory in Particle Physics (4) Review all entries Active
Laboratory—8 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 110B; PHY 115A; PHY 112 (can be concurrent); PHY 080; Or consent of the department. Registration by Permission to Add (PTA) number only; priority given to graduating PHY and APP majors. Experimental techniques and measurements in nuclear and particle physics. Students perform three to six experiments depending on difficulty. Individual work is stressed. Thorough write-ups of the experiments are required. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
PHY 123Signals and Noise in Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project)—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; PHY 009B; PHY 009C; PHY 009D; PHY 104A; or Consent of Instructor. Not open to students who have taken this course previously as course 198. Techniques of measurement and analysis designed to avoid systematic error and maximize signal/noise ratio. Illustrative examples of optimal filters ranging from condensed matter to cosmology. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHY 129AIntroduction to Nuclear Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Survey of basic nuclear properties and concepts requiring introductory knowledge of quantum mechanics: nuclear models and forces, radioactive decay and detecting nuclear radiation and nuclear reaction products, alpha, beta and gamma decay. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 129BNuclear Physics, Extensions and Applications (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHY 129A. Continuation of course 129A. Nuclear reactions, neutrons, fission, fusion accelerators, introduction to meson and particle physics, nuclear astrophysics, and applications of nuclear physics and techniques to mass spectrometry, nuclear medicine, trace element analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 130AElementary Particle Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Properties and classification of elementary particles and their interactions. Experimental techniques. Conservation laws and symmetries. Strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions. Introduction to Feynman calculus. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 130BElementary Particle Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Properties and classification of elementary particles and their interactions. Experimental techniques. Conservation laws and symmetries. Strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions. Introduction to Feynman calculus. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 140AIntroduction to Solid State Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Or equivalent course passed with C- or better. Survey of fundamental ideas in the physics of solids, with selected device applications. Crystal structure, x-ray and neutron diffraction, phonons, simple metals, energy bands and Fermi surfaces, semiconductors, optical properties, magnetism, superconductivity. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 140BIntroduction to Solid State Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115A C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Or equivalent course passed with C- or better. Survey of fundamental ideas in the physics of solids, with selected device applications. Crystal structure, x-ray and neutron diffraction, phonons, simple metals, energy bands and Fermi surfaces, semiconductors, optical properties, magnetism, superconductivity. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHY 150Special Topics in Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009A, PHY 009B, PHY 009C, PHY 009D) or (PHY 009HA, PHY 009HB, PHY 009HC, PHY 009HD, PHY 009HE); or Consent of Instructor. Topics vary, covering areas of contemporary research in physics. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 151Stellar Structure and Evolution (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; PHY 009B; PHY 009C; PHY 009D; or Consent of Instructor. The chemical composition, structure, energy sources and evolutionary history of stars, with equal emphasis on both the observational data and theoretical models, including black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs and the formation of substellar masses. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 152Galactic Structure and the Interstellar Medium (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; PHY 009B; PHY 009C; PHY 009D; PHY 105A (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. PHY 105A required concurrently. The structure, contents, and formation of our Milky Way galaxy, viz. its shape and size, the nature of the interstellar medium, stellar populations, rotation curves, mass determination and evidence of dark matter. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Spring Quarter.
PHY 153Extragalactic Astrophysics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; PHY 009B; PHY 009C; PHY 009D; PHY 104A; PHY 105A; or Consent of Instructor. Structure and evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, including distance and mass determination, galaxy types and environments, active galactic nuclei and quasars, gravitational lensing and dark matter, global cosmological properties. Not open to students who have taken PHY 127. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHY 154Astrophysical Applications of Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 105A; PHY 105B; PHY 110B (can be concurrent); PHY 115A (can be concurrent); PHY 112; PHY 112 or consent of instructor; PHY 110B and 115A required concurrently. Not open to students who have taken this course previously as course 198. Applications of classical and quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism to astrophysical settings such as the Big Bang, degenerate white dwarf and neutron stars, and solar neutrinos. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Spring Quarter.
PHY 155General Relativity (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 105B; PHY 110A; PHY 105B and PHY 110A or consent of instructor. Definition of the mathematical frame work for the description of the gravitational field, introduction of the dynamical equations of Einstein governing its evolution and review of the key solutions, including black holes and expanding universes. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 156Introduction to Cosmology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009A; PHY 009B; PHY 009C; PHY 009D; PHY 105A (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. PHY 105A required concurrently. Contemporary knowledge regarding the origin of the universe, including the Big Bang and nucleosynthesis, microwave background radiation, formation of cosmic structure, cosmic inflation, cosmic acceleration and dark energy. Not open to students who have completed PHY 126. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 157Astronomy Instrumentation and Data Analysis Laboratory (4) Active
Laboratory—8 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 105A; PHY 110A; PHY 115A (can be concurrent); PHY 110B (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Registration by Permission to Add (PTA) number only; priority given to graduating PHY astrophysics emphasis seniors. Experimental techniques, data acquisition and analysis involving laboratory astrophysics plus stellar, nebular and galaxy digital imaging, photometry and/or spectroscopy. Students perform three experiments. Individual work stressed. Minimum 10-15 page journal style articles of two experiments are required. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHY 160Environmental Physics and Society (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (PHY 009D or PHY 007C); (PHY 010 or PHY 001B); MAT 016B; Or the equivalent. Impact of humankind on the environment will be discussed from the point of view of the physical sciences. Calculations based on physical principles will be made, and the resulting policy implications will be considered. (Same course as ENG 160.) (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 185Alumni Seminar Series (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Weekly guest speakers (usually a physics alumnus or alumna) tell students about their careers. Speakers use their experience to give students valuable perspectives on life after a degree in physics. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2013 Fall Quarter.
PHY 190Careers in Physics (1) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Restricted to Physics and Applied Physics majors only. Overview of important research areas in physics, discussions of research opportunities and internships, strategies for graduate school and industrial careers, the fellowship and assistantship selection process, preparation of resumes, personal statements, and letters of recommendation. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 194HASpecial Study for Honors Students (4) Active
Independent Study—12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to Physics and Applied Physics majors who satisfy the College of Letters and Science requirements for entrance into the Honors Program. Independent research project at a level significantly beyond that defined by the normal physics curriculum. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 194HBSpecial Study for Honors Students (4) Active
Independent Study—12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to Physics and Applied Physics majors who satisfy the College of Letters and Science requirements for entrance into the Honors Program. Independent research project at a level significantly beyond that defined by the normal physics curriculum. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 195Senior Thesis (5) Active
Independent Study—15 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to Physics and Applied Physics majors with senior standing. Preparation of a senior thesis on a topic selected by the student with approval of the department. May be repeated for a total of 15 units. May be repeated up to 15 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 197TTutoring in Physics and Astronomy (1-5) Active
Tutorial. Tutoring of students in lower division courses. Leading of small voluntary discussion groups affiliated with one of the department's regular courses. Weekly meeting with instructor (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2004 Spring Quarter.
PHY 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. June 2012: GE2 Topical Breadth updated per Davis Division of the Academic Senate May 18th announcement of an administrative correction “To allow Topical Breadth designations of GE3 to apply to GE2.” (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 200ATheory of Mechanics and Electromagnetics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 204A (can be concurrent); PHY 104B; PHY 105B; PHY 110C; Or equivalent to PHY 110C; PHY 204A required concurrently. Theoretical approaches in classical mechanics including the use of generalized coordinates and virtual work; variational calculus; Lagrange equations; symmetries, conservation laws, and Noether theorem; Lagrangian density; Hamilton formalism; canonical transformations; Poisson brackets; and Hamilton-Jacobi equations. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 200BTheory of Mechnics and Electromagnetics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 200A; PHY 204B (can be concurrent); PHY 204B concurrently. Theoretical approaches in electromagnetics including static electromagnetic fields; Maxwell's equations; plane waves in various media; magnetohydrodynamics; diffraction theory; radiating systems; and special relativity. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 200CTheory of Mechanics and Electromagnetics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 200A; PHY 204B (can be concurrent); PHY 204B concurrently. Theoretical approaches in electromagnetics including static electromagnetic fields; Maxwell's equations; plane waves in various media; magnetohydrodynamics; diffraction theory; radiating systems; and special relativity. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 204AMethods of Mathematical Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; Or the equivalent. Linear vector spaces, operators and their spectral analysis, complete sets of functions, complex variables, functional analysis, Greens functions, calculus of variations, introduction to numerical analysis. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
PHY 204BMethods of Mathematical Physics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 104A; PHY 104B; Or the equivalent. Linear vector spaces, operators and their spectral analysis, complete sets of functions, complex variables, functional analysis, Green's functions, calculus of variations, introduction to numerical analysis. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 210Computational Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Fortran or C. Analytic techniques to solve differential equations and eignevalue problems. Physics content of course will be self-contained, and adjusted according to background of students. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Spring Quarter.
PHY 215AQuantum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115B; Or the equivalent. Formal development and interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics; its application to atomic, nuclear, molecular, and solid-state problems; brief introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and the Dirac equation. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 215BQuantum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115B; Or the equivalent. Formal development and interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics; its application to atomic, nuclear, molecular, and solid-state problems; brief introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and the Dirac equation. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 215CQuantum Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Independent Study—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 115B; Or the equivalent. Formal development and interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics; its application to atomic, nuclear, molecular, and solid-state problems; brief introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and the Dirac equation. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 219AStatistical Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215B; Or equivalent. Foundations of thermodynamics and classical and quantum statistical mechanics with simple applications to properties of solids, real gases, nuclear matter, etc. and a brief introduction to phase transitions. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Winter Quarter.
PHY 219BStatistical Mechanics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 219A. Further applications of thermodynamics and classical and quantum statistical mechanics. The modern theory of fluctuations about the equilibrium state, phase transitions and critical phenomena. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Winter Quarter.
PHY 223AGroup Theoretical Methods of Physics-Condensed Matter (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215A; PHY 215B; PHY 215C (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. PHY 215C required concurrently. Theory of groups and their representations with applications in condensed matter. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 223BGroup Theoretical Methods of Physics-Elementary Particles (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215A; PHY 215B; PHY 215C (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. PHY 215C required concurrently. Theory of groups and their representations with applications in elementary particle physics. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 224ANuclear Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215B. Comprehensive study of the nucleon-nucleon interaction including the deuteron, nucleon-nucleon scattering, polarization, determination of real parameters of Smatrix, and related topics. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 224BNuclear Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 224A. Study of nuclear models, including shell model, collective model, unified model. Energy level spectra, static momenta, and electromagnetic transition rates. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 224CNuclear Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 224B. Study of nuclear scattering and reactions including the optical model and direct interactions. Beta decay and an introduction to weak interactions. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 229AAdvanced Nuclear Theory (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 224C. Advanced topics in nuclear theory; theory of quantum-mechanical scattering processes. Exact formal theory and models for two-body scattering. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 229BAdvanced Nuclear Theory (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 229A. Advanced topics in nuclear theory; theory of quantum-mechanical scattering processes. Exact formal theory and models for three-body scattering. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 230AQuantum Theory of Fields (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215C. Relativistic quantum mechanics of particles; techniques and applications of second quantization; Feynman diagrams; renormalization. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 230BQuantum Theory of Fields (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 230A. Continuation of 230A, with selected advanced topics, such as S-matrix theory, dispersion relations, axiomatic formulations. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 230CQuantum Theory of Fields (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 230A; PHY 230B; or Consent of Instructor. Renormalization theory and applications, including dimensional regularization, Ward identities, renormalization group equations, coupling constant unification, and precision electroweak calculations. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHY 240A Condensed Matter Physics A (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 215C; PHY 219A; PHY 140A and PHY 140B or equivalent recommended. Topics in condensed matter physics: Crystal structure; one-electron theory; transport and optical properties of semiconductors; phonons, electron-phonon scattering. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 240BCondensed Matter Physics B (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 240A. Topics in condensed matter physics: transport and optical properties of metals and quantum structures; experimental measurement the Fermi surface and of phonon spectra. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Spring Quarter.
PHY 240CCondensed Matter Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 240A; PHY 240B. Review of second quantization. Interacting electron gas, electron-phonon interaction and effects, including instabilities of electronic systems. Topics in the theory of superconductivity and magnetism. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
PHY 241Advanced Topics in Magnetism (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 240A; PHY 240B; PHY 240C; PHY 240D; or Consent of Instructor. Topics chosen from areas of current research interest. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 242Advanced Topics in Superconductivity (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 240A; PHY 240B; PHY 240C; PHY 240D; or Consent of Instructor. Topics chosen from areas of current research interest. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 243ASurface Physics of Materials (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 140A; PHY 140B; PHY 115A; PHY 115B; Or the equivalent to any; PHY 215A, PHY 240A, or the equivalents recommended. Experimental and theoretical fundamentals of surface and interface physics and chemistry, including electronic and magnetic structure, thermodynamics, adsorption kinetics, epitaxial growth, and a discussion of various spectroscopic and structural probes based on photons, electrons, ions, and scanning probes. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Winter Quarter.
PHY 243BSurface Physics of Materials (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 140A; PHY 140B; PHY 115A; PHY 115B; Or the equivalent to any; PHY 215A, PHY 240A, or the equivalents recommended. Experimental and theoretical fundamentals of surface and interface physics and chemistry, including electronic and magnetic structure, thermodynamics, adsorption kinetics, epitaxial growth, and a discussion of various spectroscopic and structural probes based on photons, electrons, ions, and scanning probes. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Winter Quarter.
PHY 243CSurface Physics of Materials (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 140A; PHY 140B; PHY 115A; PHY 115B; Or the equivalent to any; PHY 215A, PHY 240A, or equivalents recommended. Experimental and theoretical fundamentals of surface and interface physics and chemistry, including electronic and magnetic structure, thermodynamics, adsorption kinetics, epitaxial growth, and a discussion of various spectroscopic and structural probes based on photons, electrons, ions, and scanning probes. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Spring Quarter.
PHY 245AHigh-Energy Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 230A. Phenomenology and systematics of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions of hadrons and leptons; determination of quantum numbers; quarks and quarkonia; deep inelastic scattering; the quark parton model; experiments at hadron colliders and electron-positron colliders. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 245BHigh-Energy Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 245A. Electroweak interactions; phenomenology of the Standard Model of SU(2)LxU(1); weak interaction experiments; properties of and experiments with W and Z vector bosons; Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model and the Higgs boson; introduction to supersymmetry and other speculations. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 245CCollider Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 245A; PHY 252B (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. PHY 252B taken previously or concurrently. Collider physics. Topics include quark and gluon distribution functions and the computation of cross sections; Large Hadron Collider and International Linear Collider phenomenology; collider and detector characteristics; extracting models from data; software tools for analyzing experimental data. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Spring Quarter.
PHY 246Supersymmetry: Theory and Phenomenology (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 230A, PHY 230B, PHY 245A, PHY 245B recommended, or consent of instructor. Construction of supersymmetric models of particle physics; superfields; supersymmetry breaking the minimal supersymmetric standard model; supergravity. Collider phenomenology of supersymmetry. Dark matter phenomenology. (Letter.) Effective: 1998 Spring Quarter.
PHY 246ASupersymmetry: Theory and Phenomenology (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 230A; PHY 230B; PHY 245A, PHY 245B recommended or consent of instructor. Construction of supersymmetric models of particle physics; superfields; supersymmetry breaking the minimal supersymmetric standard model; supergravity. Collider phenomenology of supersymmetry. Dark matter phenomenology. Not offered every year. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Spring Quarter.
PHY 246BAdvanced Supersymmetry (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 246A. Advanced topics in supersymmetry. Topics include holomorphy, the Affleck-Dine-Seiberg superpotential, Seiberg duality for SUSY QCD, dynamical SUSY breaking, Seiberg-Witten theory, superconformal field theories, supergravity, anomaly and gaugino mediation, and the AdS/CFT correspondence. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 250Special Topics in Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Topic varies. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Fall Quarter.
PHY 252ATechniques of Experimental Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Introduction to techniques and methods of designing and executing experiments. Problems and examples from condensed matter research will be utilized. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 252BTechniques of Experimental Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Introduction to techniques and methods of designing and executing experiments. Problems and examples from nuclear and particle research will be utilized. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 252CStatistics and Data Analysis for Particle Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Introduction to statistical data analysis methods in particle physics. Theoretical lectures combined with practical computer laboratory work. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Spring Quarter.
PHY 253Signals and Noise in Physics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Techniques for extracting signals from noise, systematic error. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHY 255Econophysics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Python, R, Excel, Matlab, or consent of instructor. Application of ideas from statistical mechanics to the financial markets. Market dynamics from a physics and systems perspective, including the statistical distributions of returns, the dynamics of prices, and models for the markets. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
PHY 256APhysics of Information (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Advanced undergraduate or introductory graduate differential equations, applied linear algebra, and probability theory; e.g., Mathematics 119A/B or 207A, 167 or 226A, and 135A/B or 235A, respectively; or in Physics 104A/C or 204A/B. Class size limited to 30 students. Nonlinear dynamics, deterministic chaos, bifurcations, pattern formation, symbolic dynamics, measurement theory, stochastic processes, elementary information theory, information in complex systems, computational laboratory. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Quarter.
PHY 256BPhysics of Computation (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): PHY 256A; Consent of Instructor. Advanced undergraduate or introductory graduate differential equations, applied linear algebra, and probability theory; e.g., Mathematics 119A/B or 207A, 167 or 226A, and 135A/B or 235A, respectively; or in Physics 104A/C or 204A/B. Class size limited to 30 students. Structural complexity, computational mechanics, information measures, causal inference, applications to complex materials, quantum dynamics, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics, computational laboratory. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Quarter.
PHY 260Introduction to General Relativity (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 200A; PHY 200B. An introduction to general relativity. Differential geometry and curved spacetime; the Einstein field equations; gravitational fields of stars and black holes; weak fields and gravitational radiation; experimental tests; Big Bang cosmology. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Spring Quarter.
PHY 262Early Universe Cosmology (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Second year standing in Physics Graduate Program or consent of instructor. Introduction to early universe cosmology: the Big Bang, inflation, primordial nucleosynthesis, dark matter, dark energy, and other topics of current interest (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
PHY 263Cosmic Structure Formation (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 260. Growth of structure from small density inhomogeneities in the early universe to the diverse structures observable today. Use of observable properties (cosmic microwave background, gravitational lensing, peculiar velocities, number density, etc.) to constrain models of structure formation and fundamental physics. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
PHY 265High Energy Astrophysics and Radiative Processes (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Survey course covering galactic and extragalactic X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, radiative processes, and techniques of high-energy astrophysics. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
PHY 266Data Analysis for Astrophysics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Survey course covering measurement and signal analysis techniques for astrophysics and cosmology throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Winter Quarter.
PHY 267Observational Extragalactic Astronomy & Cosmology (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Survey course covering current areas of research on extragalactic objects, their physical properties, origin, evolution, and distribution in space. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
PHY 268Research Methods in Astrophysics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 204A, PHY 204B and PHY 215A recommended. Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Introduction to research methods in astrophysics and cosmology. Problems and examples from observational and theoretical work will be included. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Quarter.
PHY 270Current Topics in Physics Research (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Reading and discussion to help physics graduate students develop and maintain familiarity with the current and past literature in their immediate field of research and related areas. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2013 Fall Quarter.
PHY 285Careers in Physics (1) Active
Seminar—1.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics. Designed to give Physics graduate students an in-depth appreciation of career opportunities with a graduate degree in physics. Professional physicists, mainly from outside academia, will give seminars describing both research and career insights. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Winter Quarter.
PHY 290Seminar in Physics (1) Active
Seminar. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in physics. Topics will vary weekly and will cover a broad spectrum of the active fields of physics research at a level accessible to all physics graduate students. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 291Seminar in Nuclear Physics (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in nuclear physics. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 292ASeminar in Elementary Particle Physics (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in elementary particle physics. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
PHY 292BHigh Energy Frontier Initiative And Cosmology Theory Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Physics graduate students. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s). (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHY 293Seminar in Condensed Matter Physics (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in condensed matter physics. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 294Seminar in Cosmology (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in Cosmology. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1999 Winter Quarter.
PHY 295Introduction to Departmental Research (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Seminar to introduce first- and second-year physics graduate students to the fields of specialty and research of the Physics staff. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 296Field, Strings, and Gravity Seminar (1) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Presentation and discussion of topics of current research interest in the areas of quantum field theory, string theory and gravity. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
PHY 297Research on the Teaching and Learning of Physics (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics or consent of instructor. Discussion and analysis of recent research in how students construct understanding of physics and other science concepts and the implications of this research for instruction. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 371Teaching in an Active-Engagement Physics Discussion/Lab Setting (1) Active
Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009D; Or equivalent. Open to graduate students only. Analysis of recent research on science/physics teaching and learning and its implications for teaching labs, discussions, and discussion/labs with an emphasis on differences between conventional and active-engagement instructional settings. The appropriate role of the instructor in specific instructional settings. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Summer Session 1.
PHY 390Methods of Teaching Physics (1) Active
Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing in Physics. Practical experience in methods and problems related to teaching physics laboratories at the university level, including discussion of teaching techniques, analysis of quizzes and laboratory reports and related topics. Required of all Physics Teaching Assistants. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHY 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
Courses in AST:
AST 010GIntroduction to Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Non-mathematical introduction to astrophysics of the Universe beyond our solar system using concepts of modern physics. Not open for credit to students who have taken AST 002, the former AST 010, any quarter of PHY 009 or PHY 009H, or any upper-division physics course (other than PHY 137 or PHY 160). (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2007 Summer Session 1.
AST 010LObservational Astronomy Lab (1) Active
Laboratory—2.5 hour(s). Introduction to observations of the night sky using small telescopes in nighttime laboratory. Not open for credit to students who have taken AST 002 or AST 010. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, VL. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
AST 010SAstronomy of the Solar System (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Introduction to naked eye and telescopic observations of events in the night sky: positions of sun, moon, planets throughout the year. Historical perspective on how our understanding of the solar system evolved to current non-mathematical astrophysical interpretation of planetary systems. Not open for credit to students who have taken AST 002, any quarter of PHY 009 or PHY 009H, or any upper-division physics course (other than PHY 137 or PHY 160). (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2007 Summer Session 1.
AST 025Introduction to Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—2.5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Good facility in high school physics and mathematics (algebra and trigonometry). Description and interpretation of astronomical phenomena using the laws of modern physics and observations by modern astronomical instruments. Gravity, relativity, electromagnetic radiation, atomic and nuclear processes in relation to the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Not open to students who have received credit for AST 002, AST 010G, or AST 010L. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.