Philosophy

(College of Letters and Science)

James Griesemer, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1240 Social Sciences & Humanities; philadmin@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Advising Office. 101 Young Hall; philadvising@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people/phi-faculty#c4=all&b_start=0

(College of Letters and Science)

James Griesemer, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1240 Social Sciences & Humanities; philadmin@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Advising Office. 101 Young Hall; philadvising@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people/phi-faculty#c4=all&b_start=0

The Major Program

Philosophy addresses problems and questions that arise in all areas of human thought and experience and in all disciplines. Recurring questions about the nature of value, the good life, right conduct, knowledge, truth, language, mind, and reality are central to philosophical study. Philosophy also investigates the methodologies and assumptions of the major disciplines in the university in order to deepen our understanding of the sciences, of mathematics, art, literature, and history, and of religion and morality. It leads us to address issues about the nature of these subjects, about the methods of reasoning characteristic of them, and about the contributions they make to our understanding of ourselves and our world.

Philosophy contributes to the liberal education of its students. The department emphasizes an analytic approach to philosophical questions, which trains students to understand and evaluate arguments and to think and write precisely and clearly. These skills are of immense value in a variety of careers.

The Program. The Department of Philosophy offers its majors a choice among three options. The General Emphasis provides a broad view of the field of philosophy. It includes a breadth requirement at the lower division level while providing students wide choice in more advanced courses. The Pre-Law and Pre-Med Emphases include courses that provide philosophical perspective on law and medicine respectively and that also provide important preparation for professional school.

The Department offers courses in most areas of contemporary analytic philosophy including the theory of knowledge, metaphysics, logic, ethics, and political philosophy. In addition, upper division courses are offered in moral and political philosophy, and aesthetics, and in the philosophy of religion, of mind, of language, of mathematics, of law, and of the physical, biological and social sciences. The problems of philosophy have important roots in past. The history of philosophy is important not only as part of the heritage of educated persons, but also because it is relevant to contemporary issues. For these reasons, the department places great emphasis on the history of philosophy, providing courses on the major figures and traditions of western philosophy.

Faculty Advisor. Jan Szaif, Ph.D.

Career Alternatives. Students of philosophy learn to understand and evaluate arguments and to think and write precisely and clearly. These analytical skills are assets in any career. Many of our majors have pursued graduate study in philosophy and have become philosophers in their own right. Others have pursued academic careers in related disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Philosophy majors are well prepared for law, business, or other professional schools and have found careers in computer programming, government service, teaching, the ministry, and social work. Those wishing to attend law school or medical school should considering pursuing the Pre-Law and Pre-Med emphases, respectively.

Honors Program. The department offers an honors program, which gives qualifying majors the opportunity to work closely with faculty and graduate students. Information can be obtained on the department website.

Courses for Non-Majors. Students majoring in most disciplines in the university will find courses relevant to their educational or career goals. PHI 001 is the introductory course for both majors and non-majors. PHI 005 teaches critical thinking. The following courses are recommended:

(1) Pre-law: 012, 014, 024,0 30, 102, 112, 115, 116, 118 and, especially, 119;
(2) Pre-medical: 014, 015, 030, 038, 108, 114, 115, 116;
(3) Business: 014, 102, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119;
(4) Social Policy: 014, 024, 101, 102, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120;
(5) Social Sciences: 012, 030, 031, 032, 101, 102, 103, 109, 118, 131;
(6) Physical Sciences: 012, 030, 031, 032, 101, 102, 107, 112, 131;
(7) Biological Sciences: 030, 031, 032, 038, 101, 102, 108, 120;
(8) Humanities and the Arts: 014, 021, 022, 024, 101, 102, 103, 105, 114, 116, 118, 123, 141 through 175;
(9) Agricultural and Environmental Science and Policy: 005, 014, 024, 030, 031, 114, 115, 116, 118, 120.

Department Activities. The Philosophy department sponsors a lecture series with well-known philosophers who present papers in their fields of expertise. The department also operates ongoing faculty and graduate student workshops. Undergraduate students are welcome to attend and join these discussions. Information can be obtained on the department website.

Graduate Study. The Department of Philosophy offers programs of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degree. Detailed information may be obtained by writing to the Graduate Advisor.

Graduate Advisor. Cody Gilmore, Ph.D.
General Emphasis
Units: 52
Preparatory Subject Matter
16
Choose one from any three areas:
12
(a) General Philosophy:
 
PHI 001
Introduction to Philosophy (Active)
4
(b) Ancient Philosophy:
 
PHI 021
Philosophical Classics of the Ancient Era (Active)
4
(c) Early Modern Philosophy:
 
PHI 022
Philosophical Classics of the Modern Era (Active)
4
(d) Philosophy of Mind:
 
PHI 013G
Minds, Brains, and Computers with Discussion (Active)
4
(e) Ethics
 
PHI 014
Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
PHI 015
Introduction to Bioethics (Active)
4
PHI 024
Introduction to Ethics (Active)
4
(f) Philosophy of Science:
 
PHI 030
Introduction to Philosophy of Science (Active)
4
PHI 031
Appraising Scientific Reasoning (Active)
4
PHI 032
Understanding Scientific Change (Active)
4
PHI 038
Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (Active)
4
(g) Philosophy of Language:
 
PHI 017
Language, Thought, and World (Active)
4
(h) Metaphysics:
 
PHI 101
Metaphysics (Active)
4
(i) Theory of Knowledge:
 
PHI 102
Theory of Knowledge (Active)
4
PHI 012
Introduction to Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
36
Upper division units in Philosophy
36
Note: PHI 101 and PHI 102 may not be counted toward both preparatory and depth subject matter units.
 
Pre-Law Emphasis
Units: 52
Preparatory Subject Matter
16
Choose one:
4
PHI 014
Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (Active)
4
PHI 015
Introduction to Bioethics (Active)
4
PHI 016
Philosophical Foundations of American Democracy (Active)
4
PHI 005
Critical Reasoning (Active)
4
PHI 012
Introduction to Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
PHI 024
Introduction to Ethics (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
36
Choose three:
12
PHI 102
Theory of Knowledge (Active)
4
PHI 116
Ethical Theories (Active)
4
PHI 118
Political Philosophy (Active)
4
PHI 128
Rationality (Active)
4
PHI 189C
Special Topics in Philosophy; Theory of Knowledge (Active)
4
PHI 189F
Special Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Law (Active)
4
PHI 112
Intermediate Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
PHI 119
Philosophy of Law (Active)
4
Additional upper division elective units in philosophy.
16
Pre-Med Emphasis
Units: 52
Preparatory Subject Matter
16
Choose one:
4
PHI 024
Introduction to Ethics (Active)
4
PHI 030
Introduction to Philosophy of Science (Active)
4
PHI 031
Appraising Scientific Reasoning (Active)
4
PHI 032
Understanding Scientific Change (Active)
4
PHI 012
Introduction to Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
PHI 015
Introduction to Bioethics (Active)
4
PHI 038
Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
36
Choose one:
4
PHI 107
Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (Active)
4
PHI 108
Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (Active)
4
PHI 128
Rationality (Active)
4
PHI 189I
Special Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Science (Active)
4
PHI 112
Intermediate Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
PHI 121
Bioethics (Active)
4
Additional upper division elective units in philosophy.
24
Note: Admission to medical schools requires additional coursework not included in the Pre-Med Emphasis.
 
Total: 52

(College of Letters and Science)

James Griesemer, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1240 Social Sciences & Humanities; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Graduate Advising Office. 1241 Social Sciences & Humanities; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people/phi-faculty#c4=all&b_start=0

Graduate Study. The Department of Philosophy graduate program has both M.A. and Ph.D. "tracks." The M.A. track is designed for students who do not intend to pursue a Ph.D. in philosophy or who would benefit from enrolling first in a master's degree program. Students who enroll in the M.A. track may, however, later petition for admission to the Ph.D. track if they so desire.

Graduate Advisor. Cody Gilmore, Ph.D.

(College of Letters and Science)

James Griesemer, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1240 Social Sciences & Humanities; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Graduate Advising Office. 1241 Social Sciences & Humanities; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people/phi-faculty#c4=all&b_start=0

Graduate Study. The Department of Philosophy graduate program has both M.A. and Ph.D. "tracks." Students who aim to complete a Ph.D. should apply directly to the Ph.D. track, even if they have not yet earned an M.A. in philosophy. Ph.D. students may earn the M.A. while progressing toward completion of the Ph.D. requirements.

Graduate Advisor. Cody Gilmore, Ph.D.

(College of Letters and Science)

James Griesemer, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 1240 Social Sciences & Humanities; philadmin@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Advising Office. 101 Young Hall; philadvising@ucdavis.edu; http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people/phi-faculty#c4=all&b_start=0

Students wishing to minor in Philosophy may choose a general minor or a minor specializing in logic. There are no specific courses required for the general minor, so students may create a program to suit their own interests. The range of choice in the logic specialization is limited to the courses listed.

Minor Advisor. Jan Szaif, Ph.D.


Philosophy—General
Units: 20
Upper division units in philosophy.
20
PHI 012 may be substituted for four of the upper division units.
 
Philosophy—Logic
Units: 20
PHI 012
Introduction to Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
or
MAT 108
Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (Active)
4
PHI 112
Intermediate Symbolic Logic (Active)
4
Choose 12 units:
12
PHI 113
Metalogic (Active)
4
PHI 131
Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (Active)
4
PHI 134
Modal Logic (Active)
4
PHI 135
Alternative Logics (Active)
4
PHI 189K
Special Topics in Philosophy; Logic (Active)
4
Total: 20
Courses in PHI:
PHI 001Introduction to Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Problems of philosophy through major writings from various periods. Problems are drawn from political, aesthetic, religious, metaphysical, and epistemological concerns of philosophy. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 005Critical Reasoning (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Criteria of good reasoning in everyday life and in science. Topics to be covered may include basic principles of deduction and induction; fallacies in reasoning; techniques and aids to reasoning; principles of scientific investigation; aids to clarity. Not open for credit to students who have completed PHI 006. (Letter.) GE credit: WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 007Philosophical Perspectives on Sexuality (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Philosophical issues related to sexuality, including, but not limited to, ethical and social issues regarding sexual practice, orientation, classification and identity. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2013 Winter Quarter.
PHI 007YPhilosophical Perspectives on Sexuality (3) Active
Web Virtual Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Philosophical issues related to sexuality, including, but not limited to, ethical and social issues regarding sexual practice, orientation, classification and identity. Not open for credit to students who have completed PHI 007. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, DD. Effective: 2015 Winter Quarter.
PHI 010Introduction to Cognitive Science (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Pass One open to Cognitive Science majors only. Introduction to the interdisciplinary cognitive scientific approach to the study of mind, drawing concepts and methods from psychology, philosophy, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and other disciplines. (Same course as CGS 001.) (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL. Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
PHI 011Asian Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Survey of the main philosophical systems of south and east Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Topics include the nature of reality, including God, the universe and the human self, human knowledge, and the proper conduct of human life. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHI 012Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Syntax and semantics of the symbolic language sentence logic. Symbols of sentence logic. Translation between sentence logic and English. Truth table interpretation of sentence logic. Proof techniques. Application of truth tables and proof techniques to arguments in English. Not open for credit to students who have taken PHI 112, PHI 113, PHI 134, or PHI 135 and passed with a grade of C or better. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2011 Summer Session 1.
PHI 013Minds, Brains, and Computers (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Computational theories of the nature of the mind. The mind as a computer process. The possibility of machine intelligence, consciousness, and mentality. Not open for credit for students who have completed PHI 013G for four units. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, SS. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHI 013GMinds, Brains, and Computers with Discussion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Computational theories of the nature of the mind. The mind as a computer process. The possibility of machine intelligence, consciousness, and mentality. Not open for credit for students who have completed PHI 013. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHI 014Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Philosophical issues and positions involved in contemporary moral and social problems. Possible topics include civil disobedience and revolution, racial and sex discrimination, environment, population control, technology and human values, sexual morality, freedom in society. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Spring Quarter.
PHI 015Introduction to Bioethics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Critical analysis of normative issues raised by contemporary medicine and biology. Possible topics include euthanasia, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering, informed consent and patient autonomy, experimentation on human subjects and non-human animals. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
PHI 016Philosophical Foundations of American Democracy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The philosophical underpinnings of democratic government and the tension between the goals of providing security and of preserving democracy and civil liberties. Illustration of the tension through focus on issues related to war and terrorism. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, WE. Effective: 2009 Fall Quarter.
PHI 017Language, Thought, and World (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Puzzles in the philosophy of language, such as what language is, how language conveys thoughts, whether we each speak our own private language, and what we can learn about the world by studying language. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHI 021Philosophical Classics of the Ancient Era (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Survey of ancient Western philosophy with special attention to the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Sceptics. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Spring Quarter.
PHI 022Philosophical Classics of the Modern Era (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Survey of modern Western philosophy, including Descartes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Spring Quarter.
PHI 024Introduction to Ethics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Reading of historical and contemporary philosophical works in ethics. Topics include the nature of morality, the justification of moral claims, and major ethical theories, such as consequentialist, deontological, and virtue theories. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHI 030Introduction to Philosophy of Science (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Not open for credit to students who have taken course 104. Basic problems in the philosophy of science, common to the physical, biological, and social sciences. Analysis of explanation, confirmation theory, observational and theoretical terms, the nature of theories, operationalism and behaviorism, realism, reduction. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHI 031Appraising Scientific Reasoning (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to scientific hypotheses and the kinds of reasoning used to justify such hypotheses. Emphasis on adequate justification, criteria, and strategies for distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific theories. Concrete historical and contemporary cases. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, SL, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 032Understanding Scientific Change (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Concepts of scientific change in historical and philosophical perspective. Survey of models of growth of knowledge, 17th century to present. Relationship between logic of theories and theory choice. Kuhns revolution model. Examples from various sciences. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 038Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Non-technical introduction to philosophical, social, and scientific ideas, methods and technologies in contemporary biological fields such as evolution, genetics, molecular biology, ecology, behavior. Philosophical consideration of determinism, reductionism, explanation, theory, modeling, observation, experimentation. Evaluation of scientific explanations of human nature. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2001 Spring Quarter.
PHI 098Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 099Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 101Metaphysics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Theories of being. Such topics as reality, substance, universals, space, time, causality, becoming, body, experience, persons, freedom, and determinism. Views of the nature and method of metaphysics. Anti-metaphysical arguments. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 102Theory of Knowledge (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Discussion. Prerequisite(s): One course in philosophy recommended. Analysis of the concept of knowledge. The relation between knowledge, belief and truth. Development of foundationalist, coherentist and externalist theories of justified belief. Examination of skepticism. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 103Philosophy on Mind (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. The relation between mind and body, our knowledge of other minds, and the explanation of mental acts. Discussion of such concepts as action, intention, and causation. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 104The Evolution of Mind (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One previous course in Philosophy recommended. Interpretation of human thought and behavior through the lens of evolutionary theory. Topics include the nature/nurture debate concerning cognitive and other mental capacities and traits, and the interaction between evolution, learning and development. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 105Philosophy of Religion (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Logical, metaphysical, epistemological, and existential aspects of selected religious concepts and problems. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 107Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One Philosophy course or a science background recommended. Nature of testability and confirmation of scientific hypotheses; nature of scientific laws, theories, explanations, and models. Problems of causality, determininism, induction, and probability; the structure of scientific revolutions. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 108Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Biology or one course in Philosophy recommended. Scientific method in biology. Nature of biological theories, explanations, and models. Problems of evolutionary theory, ecology, genetics, and sociobiology. Science and human values. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 109Philosophy of the Social Sciences (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy or a social science recommended. The nature of the social sciences, their subject matter and methods. Similarities to and differences from natural and life sciences. Predicting and explaining human behavior. Behaviorism. Reduction, holism, and individualism. Related moral issues. The social sciences and philosophy. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 111Philosophy of Space and Time (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One upper division Philosophy course recommended. Philosophical problems of space and time. The philosophical implications of space-time theories, such as those of Newton and Einstein. Topics may include the nature of geometry, conventionalism, absolutist versus relationist views of space and time, philosophical impact of relativity theory. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 112Intermediate Symbolic Logic (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 012 C- or better; or Consent of Instructor. Predicate logic syntax and semantics. Transcription between predicate logic and English. Models, truth-trees, and derivations. Identity, functions, and definite descriptions. Introduction to concepts of metatheory. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHI 113Metalogic (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 112; MAT 108; Or the equivalent. The metalogic of classical propositional and first-order predicate logic. Consistency, soundness and completeness of both propositional and predicate logic. The Löwenheim-Skolem theorem for predicate logic. Undecidablity of predicate logic. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2006 Fall Quarter.
PHI 114History of Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One previous Philosophy course recommended. Study of some classic texts from the history of philosophical writing on central problems of ethics, taking the form either of a survey or concentrated examination of selected historical figures. Readings from such philosophers as Aristotle, Butler, Hume, Kant, Mill. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 115Problems in Normative Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One previous course in Philosophy recommended. Moral philosophy studied through examination of moral problems and the moral principles and common sense intuitions that bear on them. Problems discussed may include: animal rights, fetal rights, euthanasia, justice and health care, war, nuclear deterrence, world hunger, environmental protection. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 116Ethical Theories (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One course in ethics recommended. Study of fundamental concepts and problems in ethical theory through an examination of classical and contemporary philosophical theories of ethics. Among the theories that may be discussed are utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of natural rights, Kantian ethical theory, and contractarianism. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 117Foundations of Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 114, 115, 116, 101, or 137 recommended. Advanced investigation of questions about the nature and foundations of morality. Among the topics that may be discussed are moral realism and anti-realism, cognitivism and non-cognitivism, types of relativism, moral skepticism, normative language and normative belief. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 118Political Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in philosophy recommended. Intensive examination of some central concepts of political thought such as the state, sovereignty, rights, obligation, freedom, law, authority, and responsibility. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 119Philosophy of Law (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. One course in philosophy recommended. Philosophical theories of the nature of law, legal obligation, the relation of law and morals. Problems for law involving liberty and justice: freedom of expression, privacy, rights, discrimination and fairness, responsibility, and punishment. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 120Environmental Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Conceptual and ethical issues concerning the environment. Extension of ethical theory to animals, all life, and ecosystem wholes. Topics may include contemporary environmental issues such as global warming, sustainability and biodiversity. Not open for credit for students who have completed PHI 115 prior to fall 2011. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 121Bioethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): PHI 015 recommended. In-depth coverage of topics in bioethics including resource allocation, measures of health and disease/disability, public health, and ethical issues related to research on human subjects and emerging technologies. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
PHI 123Aesthetics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Nature of art, of artistic creation, of the work of art, and of aesthetic experience; nature and validity of criticism; relations of art to its environment. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 125Theory of Action (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Survey of prominent contemporary approaches to leading problems in action theory. Problems include issues about the nature of intentional action and the conceptual character of explanations of actions in terms of the agent's reasons. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 128Rationality (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Philosophical issues concerning rationality in its various forms. Focus is on theoretical and practical reasoning and conditions for rational belief, choice, and action. Possible additional topics include rationality and human limitations; paradoxes of rationality; varieties of irrationality; rationality and objectivity. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 129Knowledge and the A Priori (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Self-evidence, intuition, the (in)fallibility and (in)defeasibility of a priori methods. Analytic, formalist and Kantian accounts of how knowledge can be acquired through reasoning and intuition alone, without recourse to empirical methods. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 131Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 012; Or one course for credit in mathematics. Nature of formal systems and mathematical theories. Selected topics include logical and semantical paradoxes; foundations of mathematics; set theory, type theory, and intuitionistic theory; philosophy of geometry; philosophical implications of Gödels incompleteness results. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 133Logic, Probability, and Artificial Intelligence (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 012; PHI 112. Introduction to theoretical artificial intelligence with a focus on nonmonotonic logic, Bayesian networks, and learning theory. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 134Modal Logic (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 112 or MAT 108; Or the equivalent. Survey of the main systems of modal logic, including Lewis systems S4 and S5. Possible worlds semantics and formal proofs. Applications to epistemology, ethics, or temporality. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 1998 Spring Quarter.
PHI 135Alternative Logics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 012 or MAT 108; Or the equivalent. Alternatives to standard truth-functional logic, including many-valued logics, intuitionist logics, relevance logics, and non-monotonic logics. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 136Formal Epistemology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 012. Formal (mathematical) approaches to belief revision, knowledge and deduction, meta-knowledge, (multi-agent) epistemic logic, Bayesian confirmation, Bayes nets, epistemic and probabilistic paradoxes. (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
PHI 137APhilosophy of Language: Theory of Reference (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy or Linguistics recommended. Survey of issues and views concerning reference, or how words refer to things. Topics include names and descriptions, the distinction between sense and reference, the puzzle of non-referring terms, causal theories of reference, and possibility and necessity. Only two units of credit for students who have taken PHI 137. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 137BPhilosophy of Language: Truth and Meaning (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy or Linguistics recommended. Comparative treatment of theories about the relationship between truth and meaning. Topics include: the identification of meaning with truth conditions, the nature of propositions, theories of linguistic understanding, the roles of mind and world in determining meaning. Only two units of credit for students who have taken PHI 137. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 137CPhilosophy of Language: Semantics and Pragmatics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy or Linguistics recommended. Philosophical issues and positions concerning the meaning and use of language. Topics include the distinction between meaning and implication, the roles of context and convention in language use, speaker meaning versus linguistic meaning and speech act theory. Only two units of credit for students who have taken PHI 137. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 141Socrates and the Socratic Dialogue (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Philosophy of Socrates as found in the Socratic dialogues of Plato. Topics include the Socratic practice of refutation, its method, epistemological foundation, and moral purpose; Socratic eudaimonism and Socratic virtue theory; the paradoxes of Socratic intellectualism. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 143Hellenistic Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Positions and arguments of the major philosophical schools of the Hellenistic period: Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Scepticism. Focus is on ethical, epistemological and metaphysical questions and their interconnectedness. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 145Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Philosophers of the Middle Ages (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Major Christian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophers of the Middle Ages. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
PHI 151Nineteenth Century European Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022 recommended. Survey of the main movements in nineteenth century philosophy on the European continent. Idealism in Schopenhauer and Hegel, dialectical materialism in Marx, irrationalism in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 156Contemporary Analytic Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Consideration of central issues such as meaning/reference, analytic/synthetic, reductionism, formal and ordinary language, essential properties, ontological commitment, possible world semantics; influential works by philosophers such as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Austin, Carnap, Quine, Putnam, Kripke, van Fraassen. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 157Twentieth Century European Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy recommended. Survey of the main movements in twentieth century philosophy on the European continent, including phenomenology, existentialism, post-structuralism and post-modernism. Philosophers covered are Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Foucault, Derrida. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 160Pre-Socratics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Study of the metaphysical views of such pre-Socratic figures as the Milesians, the Pythagoreans, Heracleitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, and the atomists. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 161Plato (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Examines Platos most important contributions in metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, cosmology, ethics and political philosophy. Dialogues will be selected from Platos middle and later writings. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 162Aristotle (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 021 recommended. Overview of Aristotles most central and influential writings. Topics selected from fields such as metaphysics, physics, ethics, logic, and psychology. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 168Descartes (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022 recommended. Philosophical writings of René Descartes. Topics include the refutation of skepticism, the nature and existence of mind and body, the existence of God, and the foundations of science. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 170Spinoza and Leibniz (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022 recommended. Seventeenth-century philosophical writings of Spinoza and Leibniz. Topics drawn from both philosophers include: the nature and existence of God, the nature of mind, the relation between mind and body, human freedom, metaphysical monism vs. pluralism. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 172Locke and Berkeley (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022 recommended. Principal metaphysical works of John Locke and George Berkeley. Topics include abstract ideas, existence of matter, primary and secondary qualities, essence, substance, the existence of God, and the nature of scientific knowledge. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 174Hume (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022N. David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature and related writings. Topics include empiricism, space, causality, belief, skepticism, the passions, and morality. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2003 Fall Quarter.
PHI 175Kant (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHI 022 recommended. Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and related writings. Topics include the nature of human cognition, space and time, a priori concepts, substance, causality, human freedom, and the existence of God. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 178Frege (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. One upper division course in Philosophy recommended. Development of Gottlob Frege's views about language and logic. Formulation of his grand mathematical idea known as logicism and how it led to the philosophy of language. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
PHI 189ASpecial Topics in Philosophy; History of Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in History of Philosophy. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189BSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Metaphysics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Metaphysics. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189CSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Theory of Knowledge (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Theory of Knowledge. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189DSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Ethics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Ethics. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189ESpecial Topics in Philosophy; Political Philosophy (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Political Philosophy. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189FSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Law (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Philosophy of Law. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189GSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Aesthetics (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Aesthetics. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189HSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Philosophy of Mind. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189ISpecial Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Science (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special Topics in Philosophy of Science. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SE, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189JSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Philosophy of Language (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Philosophy of Language. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 189KSpecial Topics in Philosophy; Logic (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): One course in the area of the special topic recommended. Special topics in Logic. May be repeated up to 8 Unit(s). (Letter.) GE credit: AH. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
PHI 194HAHonors Research Project (4) Active
Tutorial—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open to students who are members of the honors program in Philosophy. Completion of honors research project under direction of an instructor. Consult departmental major advisor for list of instructors available in a given quarter. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 194HBResearch Project (4) Active
Tutorial—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open to students who are members of the honors program in Philosophy. Completion of honors research project under direction of an instructor. Consult departmental major advisor for list of instructors available in a given quarter. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 200AProseminar I (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to students in their first quarter of the Philosophy Ph.D. program. Intensive study of core works in a selected area of philosophy. Intensive experience in philosophical writing, discussion, and presentation of written work. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHI 200BProseminar II (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to students in their first quarter of the Philosophy Ph.D. program. Intensive study of core works in a selected area of philosophy. Intensive experience in philosophical writing, discussion, and presentation of written work. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Winter Quarter.
PHI 201Metaphysics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter and may include the following: What are things? Do names refer to things? If so, how? Do things have essential properties? What is the nature of necessity? May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHI 202Theory of Knowledge (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. Sample topics include belief, skepticism, justification, externalism, naturalized epistemology. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit topic is sufficiently distinct. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHI 203Philosophy of Mind (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the philosophy of mind, such as the mind-body problem, mental representation, consciousness, intentionality. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHI 203PPhilosophy of Mind Practicum (4) Active
Practice—12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Specific research conducted and prepared for publication by advanced students in a team setting. Topics include knowledge representation and learning in neural networks, the nature and formal properties of mental representation. May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2001 Spring Quarter.
PHI 207Philosophy of Physics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of physics, such as foundations of spacetime theories, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, or foundations of statistical mechanics. May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
PHI 208Philosophy of Biology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of biology, such as foundations of evolutionary theories, reductionism in biology, sociobiology and cultural evolution. May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Spring Quarter.
PHI 210Philosophy of Science (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Treatment of one or more general topics of current interest in philosophy of science. Topics may include scientific explanation, theories of confirmation, scientific realism, reduction in physics and biology. May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
PHI 212Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): PHI 112 or PHI 113 or MAT 108; or MAT 125 or the equivalent. Philosophical issues in logic and math. Topics may include nature of logical and mathematical truth or knowledge, correctness of logical systems, foundations of mathematics, metaphysical and epistemological presuppositions, applications to philosophical problems and formalization of philosophical theories May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
PHI 213Advanced Logic for Graduate Students (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Philosophy. Enrollment in the Philosophy Ph.D. program. Intensive study of advanced logic, including set theory, metatheory of predicate logic, and modal logic. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s) when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
PHI 214Ethics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics may include morality and motivation, objectivity in ethics, the relationship between the factual and the moral. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit topic differ and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
PHI 217Political Philosophy (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced studies in political philosophy. Topics vary but may include distributive justice, enforcement of morality by the state, equality, obligation to obey the law, social contract theory. May be repeated for credit topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHI 220Environmental Ethics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one or more topic(s) in environmental ethics, such as biodiversity, sustainability, composition of the moral community, invasive species, endangered species, applications of ethical theories to contemporary environmental issues. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Winter Quarter.
PHI 237Philosophy of Language (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Study of philosophical issues raised by language, such as the nature of semantic content, proper semantics for verbs of propositional attitude, feasibility and limitations of formal semantics and pragmatics for natural languages. May be repeated for credit if topic differs and consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
PHI 238Philosophy of Language Workshop (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Open to graduate students only. Discussion of recently published, unpublished and in-progress research in philosophy of language, including work on the relation of language and mind, of language and logic, and linguistic theory. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
PHI 261Plato (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Plato's works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHI 262Aristotle (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Aristotle's works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Spring Quarter.
PHI 275Kant (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive study of a topic in the philosophy of Kant, in such areas as metaphyics, theory of knowledge, ethics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Winter Quarter.
PHI 290History of Philosophy (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the history of philosophy. Topics vary according to instructor from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
PHI 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
PHI 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.