Law, School of

School of Law

Kevin Johnson, J.D., Dean

Madhavi Sunder, J.D., Associate Dean; Academic Affairs

Hollis L. Kulwin, J.D., Senior Assistant Dean; Student Affairs

Kristen Mercado, J.D., Assistant Dean; Admission and Financial Aid

Brett C. Burns, Senior Assistant Dean; Administration

Dean’s Office. 1011 Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall; 530-752-0243; http://www.law.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://law.ucdavis.edu/faculty/

The University of California Davis School of Law offers a three-year professional curriculum leading to the degree of Juris Doctor. Within a uniquely supportive atmosphere, law students have access to a comprehensive modern law school curriculum taught by a nationally and internationally distinguished faculty. The School offers a full range of traditional law courses, opportunities for practical experience through clinical programs, and in-depth study of an area of law in an individualized program of classroom work, research, writing, or experience in the community. It further provides professional skills training in interviewing and counseling, negotiation and dispute resolution and trial practice. The School seeks to promote critical evaluation of law and legal institutions in a broad perspective, integrating non-legal disciplines with professional legal education.

UC Davis Law School is fully accredited by the American Bar Association, is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, and has a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

Program of Study

The professional curriculum requires six semesters for completion and extends over a period of three years. It is for full-time students only; no part-time or evening program is offered. New students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall semester.

After satisfactorily completing the professional curriculum of 88 semester units and the required period of resident study, you will receive the degree of Juris Doctor (J.D.). Students who fail to attain satisfactory grades may be required to withdraw from the School at the end of any academic year.

The first year’s work is prescribed and provides the essential foundation for subsequent legal study. Satisfactory completion of the first-year courses is, in all cases, prerequisite to second- and third-year courses. The work of the second and third years is elective. The courses of the professional curriculum are listed in the Undergraduate Courses chapter.

Combined Degree Programs

Individual students may find a combined degree involving law and another discipline such as economics, business, sociology, or science advantageous. To support this kind of study, the School, in conjunction with other schools and university departments, has established Combined Degree Programs. Under these programs, a student may work toward a J.D. degree and a master’s degree in another discipline at the same time. Students working toward a combined degree are required to spend their first year at the law school.

Normally, a Combined Degree Program will take at least four years. You will usually be able to earn up to 10 semester-hours of law school credit for work in the related discipline and normally can complete the combined degrees in less time than it would take to earn the two degrees separately. The first year of the Combined Degree Program must be taken entirely in the School of Law. During the remaining years, course work may be divided between the law school and the related discipline. You must satisfy the admission requirements for both programs and file applications with both units.

Students have pursued degree programs in combination with UC Davis departments for the M.A. degree in economics, philosophy, computer science, and sociology, and with the School of Management for the M.B.A. degree. The law school will attempt to work out an additional program if you are interested in other disciplines. You may enroll in the Combined Degree Program any time before the beginning of your third year in law school. If you are interested in pursuing a Combined Degree Program, and have made a separate application to another school or department, you should notify the School of Law if that application is accepted.

School of Law

Kevin Johnson, J.D., Dean

Madhavi Sunder, J.D., Associate Dean; Academic Affairs

Hollis L. Kulwin, J.D., Senior Assistant Dean; Student Affairs

Kristen Mercado, J.D., Assistant Dean; Admission and Financial Aid

Brett C. Burns, Senior Assistant Dean; Administration

Dean’s Office. 1011 Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall; 530-752-0243; http://www.law.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://law.ucdavis.edu/faculty/

The University of California Davis School of Law offers a three-year professional curriculum leading to the degree of Juris Doctor. Within a uniquely supportive atmosphere, law students have access to a comprehensive modern law school curriculum taught by a nationally and internationally distinguished faculty. The School offers a full range of traditional law courses, opportunities for practical experience through clinical programs, and in-depth study of an area of law in an individualized program of classroom work, research, writing, or experience in the community. It further provides professional skills training in interviewing and counseling, negotiation and dispute resolution and trial practice. The School seeks to promote critical evaluation of law and legal institutions in a broad perspective, integrating non-legal disciplines with professional legal education.

UC Davis Law School is fully accredited by the American Bar Association, is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, and has a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

Program of Study

The professional curriculum requires six semesters for completion and extends over a period of three years. It is for full-time students only; no part-time or evening program is offered. New students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall semester.

After satisfactorily completing the professional curriculum of 88 semester units and the required period of resident study, you will receive the degree of Juris Doctor (J.D.). Students who fail to attain satisfactory grades may be required to withdraw from the School at the end of any academic year.

The first year’s work is prescribed and provides the essential foundation for subsequent legal study. Satisfactory completion of the first-year courses is, in all cases, prerequisite to second- and third-year courses. The work of the second and third years is elective. The courses of the professional curriculum are listed in the Undergraduate Courses chapter.

Combined Degree Programs

Individual students may find a combined degree involving law and another discipline such as economics, business, sociology, or science advantageous. To support this kind of study, the School, in conjunction with other schools and university departments, has established Combined Degree Programs. Under these programs, a student may work toward a J.D. degree and a master’s degree in another discipline at the same time. Students working toward a combined degree are required to spend their first year at the law school.

Normally, a Combined Degree Program will take at least four years. You will usually be able to earn up to 10 semester-hours of law school credit for work in the related discipline and normally can complete the combined degrees in less time than it would take to earn the two degrees separately. The first year of the Combined Degree Program must be taken entirely in the School of Law. During the remaining years, course work may be divided between the law school and the related discipline. You must satisfy the admission requirements for both programs and file applications with both units.

Students have pursued degree programs in combination with UC Davis departments for the M.A. degree in economics, philosophy, computer science, and sociology, and with the School of Management for the M.B.A. degree. The law school will attempt to work out an additional program if you are interested in other disciplines. You may enroll in the Combined Degree Program any time before the beginning of your third year in law school. If you are interested in pursuing a Combined Degree Program, and have made a separate application to another school or department, you should notify the School of Law if that application is accepted.

Courses of Instruction. The courses listed below have all been taught at least once in the last three years. There is no guarantee that any given course will be taught within the next three years. The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of semester credits. For current information, see Law School Course Descriptions.

Courses in LAW:
LAW 200Introduction to Law (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to basic concepts of the law, the historical roots of common law and equity, the precedent system in its practical operation, the modes of reasoning used by courts and attorneys, and the fundamentals of statutory interpretation. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 200AU S Legal System Seminar (LL.M.) (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). History and fundamental principles of the United States legal system. Important current legal issues, developments and trends. Required for LL.M. students who have not attended a U.S. law school. Fall semester only. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 200BU S Legal Methods I (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture. Course is only offered to LL.M. students. Designed to provide background skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. Gain an introductory working knowledge of the US legal methods which includes learning various forms of legal writing and speaking. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 200BTU.S. Legal Methods A (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Course is designed to provide background skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. Students gain an introductory working knowledge of the US legal method which includes learning various forms of legal writing and speaking. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 200CU S Legal Methods II (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture. Open to LL.M. students only. Designed to provide background skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. Gain an introductory working knowledge of the US legal method which includes learning various forms of legal writing and speaking. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 200CTU.S. Legal Methods B (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Course is designed to provide background skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. Students gain an introductory working knowledge of the US legal method which includes learning various forms of legal writing and speaking. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 200DAmerican Legal Concepts I (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Course is only offered to LL.M. students. Designed to provide basic skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 200DTAdvanced Introduction to American Legal Concepts and Methods (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Course is only offered to LL.M. students. Building on the Introduction to American Law course, this course will provide additional instruction in American law and legal methods. Students will audit selected substantive courses and will produce a series of legal memoranda. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 200EAmerican Legal Concepts II (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture. Course is only offered to LL.M. students. Designed to provide basic skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 200LLawyering Process Lab (0) Active
Laboratory. Lab which accompanies Lawyering Skills course for first-year law students. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 200SLawyering Process (2) Active
Discussion. Students will hone interactive lawyering skills needed for effective transactional and litigation work, including client interviewing and negotiation. They will learn the role that interpersonal skills play in effective lawyering and contemplate the professional identity they wish to cultivate. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 201Property (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): AAS 010; LAW 200A; or Consent of Instructor. text here. A study of doctrines and concepts of property law with primary emphasis on real property. Course coverage includes: the estates in land system; the landlord-tenant relationship, conveyancing, and private and public land use control. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 202Contracts (5) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—5 hour(s). Examines sorts of promises that are enforced and the nature of protection given promissory obligations in both commercial and noncommercial transactions. Inquiry is made into the means by which traditional doctrine adjusts or fails to adjust to changing social demands (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 202Contracts (4) Review all entries Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Examines sorts of promises that are enforced and the nature of protection given promissory obligations in both commercial and noncommercial transactions. Inquiry is made into the means by which traditional doctrine adjusts or fails to adjust to changing social demands (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 203Civil Procedure (5) Active
Discussion—5 hour(s). A study of the fundamental and recurrent problems in civil actions including the methods used by federal and state courts to resolve civil disputes. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Summer Special Session.
LAW 204Torts (5) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—5 hour(s). Familiarizes students with legal rules, concepts and approaches pertinent to the recovery for personal injuries, property damages and harm done to intangible interests. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 204Torts (4) Review all entries Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Familiarizes students with legal rules, concepts and approaches pertinent to the recovery for personal injuries, property damages and harm done to intangible interests. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 205Constitutional Law I (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). The principles, doctrines and controversies regarding the basic structure of and division of powers in American government. Specific topics include judicial review, jurisdiction, standing to sue, federalism, federal and state powers and immunities, and the separation of powers among the (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Semester.
LAW 206Criminal Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Study of the bases and limits of criminal liability. Coverage of the constitutional, statutory, and case law rules which define, limit, and provide defenses to individual liability for the major criminal offenses. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 207Legal Research and Writing I (2) Active
Discussion/Laboratory—2 hour(s). Fall semester course taught by Wydick Fellowship Program faculty is an integrated legal research and writing skills course. Basic legal research resources and strategies are introduced and practiced. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 207ALegal Research (LL.M.) (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Restricted to LL.M. students only. Description of the evolution and use of sources of law and secondary authority. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 207BAdvanced Legal Research (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Restricted to 35 students. Will introduce students to advanced legal research tools and techniques used in practice, including efficient computer research techniques. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 208Legal Research and Writing II (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Focuses on persuasive writing and oral advocacy. Students will complete integrated research and writing assignments, including a complaint, a strategic defense office memorandum, a motion to dismiss in federal court, and an appellate brief, with oral arguments by all students. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 208ALegal Research and Writing II (LL.M.) (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Persuasive writing and oral advocacy. LL.M. students complete integrated research and writing assignments, including a complaint, a strategic defense office memorandum, a motion to dismiss in federal court, and an appellate brief with oral arguments. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 208EIntroduction to U.S. Legal Methods A (3) Active
Lecture. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Restricted to LL.M. students. Designed to provide foreign students with background skills at a more basic level than U.S. Legal Methods A and B. Students will audit carefully selected courses in the regular curriculum and complete assignments related to those courses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 208FIntroduction to U.S. Legal Methods B (LLM) (3) Active
Seminar. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Restricted to LL.M. students. Designed to provide foreign students with background skills at a more basic level than U.S. Legal Methods A and B. Students will audit carefully selected courses in the regular curriculum and complete assignments related to those courses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 208GU.S. Legal Methods A (LL.M.) (3) Active
Lecture. Restricted to LL.M. students. Designed to provide foreign and other students with background skills necessary to succeed in both law school and legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 208HU.S. Legal Methods B (LL.M.) (3) Active
Seminar. A description of the evolution and use of sources of law and secondary authority. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 209APatent Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 274; or Consent of Instructor. Covers all essential aspects of patent law: patentable subject matter, novelty, utility, nonobviousness, enablement, prosecution, infringement, and remedies. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 209BPatent Prosecution and Practice (3) Review all entries Historical
Seminar. Examines core requirements and strategies for drafting and prosecuting a patent application before the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. Students will interact with real inventors and US PTO examiners to gain the experience of getting a patent issued. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 209BPatent Prosecution and Practice (2) Review all entries Active
Seminar. Examines core requirements and strategies for drafting and prosecuting a patent application before the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. Interact with real inventors and US PTO examiners to gain the experience of getting a patent issued. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 209CPatentable Subject Matter: Genes, Methods, and Software (2) Active
Seminar. In-depth look at recent cases and debates behind genetic patenting, software; business models; diagnostic methods, and others. Reviews the crucial and rapidly evolving field of patent law which affects some of the most important hi-tech industries. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 209DTInnovation Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Explores range of legal issues that innovation lawyers face, from establishing a start-up to high stakes technology mergers & acquisitions, to data protection and privacy, protecting intellectual property through strategic patent litigation. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 209EPatent Litigation (1) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s). Introduces the basics of Patent Law and examines the U.S. patent enforcement system. Learn how a patent litigation proceeds, focusing on both pre- and post-trial proceedings and examines substantive patent laws. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 209TInnovation and Technology Transfer Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 209A or LAW 274, recommended but not required. Restricted to 15 students. From biomedicine to cleantech, public institutions are playing leading roles in developing cutting-edge technologies. Explores the law and policy of publicly-supported innovation and technology transfer. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 210Reforming the Police and Criminal Justice (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited to 25 students. Focus on major current issues: policing ethnic neighborhoods; use of deadly force; modernizing the work of prosecutors and defense counsel. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 210APrivatization of Criminal Justice Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Prior social theory or ciminal procedure knowledge not required; completion of LAW 227A strongly recommended. Restricted to 10 students. Analyze the legal, historical, and sociological aspects of the growing private sector provision of criminal justice services traditionally assumed by government, including prisons, policing, and adjudication. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 210BSociology of Criminal Procedure (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. What are the expectations and roles of the police in a democratic society? We need order maintenance and crime control, but to assume these tasks the police sometimes intrude upon interests considered fundamental to free societies. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 210CSexual Assault and the Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Criminal law of sexual assault, traditional and modern offenses, and proposals for reform. Discussion of procedural developments, victim’s counsel, evidentiary reform, and ADR. And the implications for civil law, tort liability, Title VI, Title IX, and civil liability of perpetrators. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 210DTWrongful Convictions (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Course will explore the magnitude and complexity of the wrongful convictions, their causes and remedies under existing law, and possible fixes (reforms). It will emphasize relevant legal rules (Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Post-Conviction Review). (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 210ETRace, Mass Incarceration and Policing (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Key issues in the historical development and the current state of modern American imprisonment, policing structures, and the criminal justice system in relation to race. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 210FRestorative Justice (2) Active
Seminar. Explore both the theory and practice of restorative justice as an alternative approach to the retributive justice model of our current criminal law system and many other institutions. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 210GAoki Center Restorative Justice Practicum (1) Active
Fieldwork. Learn about restorative justice principles and practices, receive training in restorative justice facilitation, and participate in and lead restorative justice circles in Davis and Sacramento schools, Yolo County Juvenile Hall, and other venues. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 210HAoki Federal Court Amicus Project (3) Active
Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): LAW 203; LAW 219; both required or consent of instructor. Work on actual federal criminal cases in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and United States Supreme Court. File briefs amicus curiae on critical issues, and develop research, writing, and oral advocacy skills. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 211Negotiations (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Skills course teaches theoretical and empirical approaches to negotiation strategy for the purposes of making deals and resolving disputes. Students participate in simulations to hone their negotiation skills, and write analytical papers. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 211AAdvanced Negotiations Strategy and Client Counseling (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Application course; must apply and secure professor approval to enroll; will involve participating in discussions and a series of simulations; your classmates will be counting on you to actively participate and be well prepared for every simulation; do not apply to take this course unless you are willing and able to participate fully and can accept constructive feedback; if you anticipate missing more than two class sessions, do not apply to take this course. Understand the dynamics of interviewing and counseling process. Designed to be relevant to a broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by legal professionals. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 211BInternational Business Negotiations (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion. Prerequisite(s): LAW 215 (can be concurrent); Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Business Associations (LAW 215) required; prior enrollment in Negotiations (LAW 211) and/or International Business Transactions (LAW 270) preferred. Course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise with students from a similar class at Stanford Law School. Students will experience the development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation in a context that replicates actual legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 211BTInternational Business Negotiations (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion/Laboratory—3 hour(s). Course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise with students from a similar class at Stanford Law School. Students will experience the development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation in a context that replicates actual legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 211BTInternational Business Negotiations (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion/Laboratory—3 hour(s). Course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise with students from a similar class at Stanford Law School. Students will experience the development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation in a context that replicates actual legal practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 212AMedical Liability Law and Policy (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). This course will consider the many ways in which society seeks to establish and maintain quality in patient care. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 213ATransnational Criminal Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 205; LAW 206. Will examine the laws responses to a particular aspect of globalization, transnational crime. The course will explore the phenomenon of transnationality and how it affects the power of nation-states, acting alone or together, to prosecute certain crimes. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 213TTerrorism and International Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). International terrorism remains a pressing concern. Devising effective remedies for responding to it within the bounds of the law is critical. Therefore, the new generation of international lawyers needs to be familiar with the relevant law and standards. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 214Tax Issues Related to Estate Planning (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 221 recommended. Tax issues Related to estate planning. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 214AMigration, Work, and Taxation (2) Active
Seminar. Explores workers’ and prospective workers’ choices to move from one place to another, both across and within national borders. In particular, explores how tax policy and broader economic forces shape those choices. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 215Business Associations (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Legal rules and concepts applicable to business associations, both public and closely held. Corporate form of organization, partnerships and other associational forms. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 215AThe Law of Corporate Governance Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215. Advanced issues in the governance of publicly held corporations. Separation of ownership and control and how the law has addressed this issue at the theoretical level and in the context of topics such as the duties of corporate directors, shareholder voting rights, and competition among states to attract corporate charters. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Fall Semester.
LAW 215BCorporate Integrity and Responsibility (2) Active
Lecture. Equips future business lawyers with the legal knowledge and technical skills to better understand, the U.S, European and Asian (select jurisdictions) regulatory responses to ethical and socially responsible corporate governance practices. Instruction seeks to re-define the aim of corporate governance as a tool to address efficiency, reduce agency costs and improve access to capital, as well as an emerging anti-corruption tool and a means to ensure more ethical corporate behavior. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 215SSpecial Session Business Associations (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Provides a broad survey of the legal rules and concepts applicable to business associations, both public and closely. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Spring Semester.
LAW 216ALaw and Religion (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Restricted to 20 students. Federal constitutional law relating to religion; the interpretation and application of the Free Exercise Clause and the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 217Telecommunications Law (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Economic and administrative regulation of telephony, radio and television broadcasting, and video technologies such as cable and direct broadcast satellites. Emphasis on the recently enacted Telecommunications Reform Act and the role of the Federal Communications Commission, as well as other sources of regulation such as related antitrust law and state public utility regulation. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Spring Semester.
LAW 217Telecommunications Law (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—3 hour(s). Economic and administrative regulation of telephony, radio and television broadcasting, and video technologies such as cable and direct broadcast satellites. Emphasis on the recently enacted Telecommunications Reform Act and the role of the Federal Communications Commission, as well as other sources of regulation such as related antitrust law and state public utility regulation. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 217Insurance Law (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Covers the following topics: I. Insurance Law and Society, II. The Impact of Insurance, III. Contract Law Foundations, IV. First-Party Insurance, V. Liability Insurance: Coverage Issues, VI. Liability Insurance: Relationship Issues. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 218Constitutional Law II (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Not open to students who have completed course 218A or 218B. Principally covers the First Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 218AConstitutional Law II--Equal Protection (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Students who have previously taken course 218, or who plan to take course 218 for 4 units in Spring 2011, may not take this course. Students enrolled in this course will be given priority registration spring semester 2011 to enroll in course 218B. Focuses on the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 218BConstitutional Law II -- First Amendment (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Students who have previously taken course 218 or who plan to take course 218 for 4 units in Spring 2011 may not take this course. Students not required to take course 218A in order to take this course. Principally covers the free speech clause of the First Amendment. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 218DConstitutional Theory Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Provides students with a broad understanding of the shape of modern constitutional theory, and the ability to understand the implications of that theory for concrete historical and modern constitutional disputes. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 218ETCalifornia Constitutional Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Reviews, interpretive meta-rules for constitutional construction, structure and institutions of state government, civil liberties under the Declaration of Rights, the impact of race in California society, and criminal law. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 218TSelected Topics in Constitutional Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Examines two core themes of Constitutional Law I and Federal Jurisdiction: federalism and separation of powers. Concentrates on habeas corpus and the Eleventh Amendment as vehicles for examining the constitutional themes in greater depth. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 218TASeparation of Powers (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Study of the separation of powers in our federal government by focusing on certain historical events and their impact on constitutional law. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Spring Semester.
LAW 218TBLaw of War (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Surveys the law of armed conflict as it applies to today’s battlefields. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 218TCAntidiscrimination Law (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Course offers an overview of federal constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination law in the United States. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 219Evidence (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion. Covers rules regarding the admissibility of proof during civil and criminal cases, including rules governing relevancy, hearsay, the examination and impeachment of witnesses, expert opinion, and constitutional and statutory privileges. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 219Evidence (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion. Covers rules regarding the admissibility of proof during civil and criminal cases, including rules governing relevancy, hearsay, the examination and impeachment of witnesses, expert opinion, and constitutional and statutory privileges. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 219Evidence (3) Review all entries Active
Lecture/Discussion. Covers rules regarding the admissibility of proof during civil and criminal cases, including rules governing relevancy, hearsay, the examination and impeachment of witnesses, expert opinion, and constitutional and statutory privileges. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 219AAdvanced Evidence (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219. Limited to six students; selected by professor. Interested students complete an application form; available in the Law Registrar's Office. Credit is contingent on attending all classes and participating in all exercises. Participation is crucial to the success of the course, as students will be working in teams of three. Do not take this course unless you are willing and able to participate fully and can accept criticism. Public interest lawyers often spend much time in the courtroom. Prosecution, defender, and legal aid offices usually don't have resources to train lawyers in trial work. Seeks to help remedy this deficiency by helping develop witness interrogation skills. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 219BE-Discovery and Digital Evidence (2) Active
Lecture. Examines the interplay between the significant e-discovery rules and case law, and the process of electronic discovery, beginning with the duty to preserve electronically stored information (ESI), to the search, identification, collection, review and production of ESI in litigation. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 220Federal Income Taxation (4) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Surveys the federal income tax system, with consideration of the nature of income, when and to whom income is taxable, exclusions from the tax base, deductions and credits, and tax consequences of property ownership and disposition. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Spring Semester.
LAW 220AState and Local Taxation (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Introduction to fundamentals of state and local taxation. Beginning with historical and constitutional aspects, student analyze recent developments in state and local taxation and their impact on client representation. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 220BTax and Distributive Justice (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Advanced tax course designed to introduce students to issues of tax policy, with particular emphasis on tax distribution (i.e., who or what should pay taxes in society) and tax incidence (i.e., who or what ends up paying taxes in society). (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 220BTLaw of Banking and Financial Institutions (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Guide to dual regulatory system, and an understanding of banks and other financial institutions, such as thrifts, credit unions, industrial banks, finance companies, and money transmitters, as well as large versus community banks. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Spring Semester.
LAW 220SSpecial Session Federal Income Taxation (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Introduction to the basic principles of federal income taxation using the American federal tax model. Topics include identification of income subject to taxation, gains and losses from property transactions, the timing of income and deductions and the identity of people subject to tax on particular items of income. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 220TState and Local Taxation (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Introduction to fundamentals of state and local taxation. Beginning with historical and constitutional aspects, students will analyze recent developments in state and local taxation and their impact on client representation. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 221Trusts, Wills and Estates (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Study of the law of decedent’s estates, wills, and trusts. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 221APractical Skills in Will & Trust Drafting and Administration (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Provides the skills to practice law in the area of estate planning and probate/trust administration. Follow an estate planning client and draft actual estate plan documents. A series of related topics will be explored. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 222Critical Race Theory Seminar (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines race relations and racial discrimination in America through the perspectives of proponents of the Critical Race Theory (CRT) movement, a collection of legal scholars who challenge both conservative and liberal political orthodoxies. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 222ALatinos and Latinas and the Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Seminar analyzes some of the legal issues of particular relevance to the Latino community in the United States, including racial identity, immigration, language regulation, national and transnational identity issues, affirmative action, and civil rights. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 222BAsian Pacific Americans and Law (3) Active
Seminar. Examines how American Law has shaped Asian Pacific American demographics, experiences, and status in American society. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 222CTAnti-Corruption Law in India (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Addresses the impact of large corruption scandals on long term social trust, in light of Indian coal block and 2G spectrum allocation scandals. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 223Estate Planning Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Selected topics in the estates and trusts area. Content varies with instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 224Animal Law Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). An introduction to legal principles affecting animals and their use. (Letter.) GE credit: WE. Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 225Marital Property (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Covers the California community property system, including the rights of marital and domestic partners during the ongoing relationship, and upon the end of the relationship by death or divorce. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Semester.
LAW 226Disability Rights Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines disability law and theory. Devoted to the Americans with Disabilities Act (particularly Titles I, II, and III) as it applies to employment, education, public accommodations, and government services and programs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 226ETMental Disability Law (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Students will examine the civil and constitutional bases of mental disability law, as well as its history, and explore the role of mental disability in the policing and criminal trial process. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 227ACrimiminal Procedure (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Federal constitutional limits on government authority to gather evidence and investigate crime. Topics include Fourth Amendment limits on search, seizure, and arrest; the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment right to counsel. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Semester.
LAW 227BAdvanced Criminal Procedure (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines a range of issues, including bail, charging decisions, preliminary hearings, discovery, statute of limitations, venue, joinder and severance, pleas, plea bargaining, assistance of counsel, trial, double jeopardy, sentencing, appeal and collateral remedies. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 227CTopics in California Criminal Practice (2) Active
Seminar. Advanced criminal law and procedure class aimed at students planning to practice criminal law in California, either as an extern or summer clerk, or after graduation. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 228Startups and Venture Capital (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion. Prerequisite(s): LAW 215; Prerequisite will not be waived, do not register for the course unless you have completed LAW 215. Limited enrollment. Introduction to the various legal and business considerations involved in forming and operating an emerging growth business. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 228AMergers and Acquisitions (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215. Practical approach to mergers and acquisitions, with an in-depth look at the planning, negotiation, documentation and completion of mergers and acquisitions. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 228AMergers and Acquisitions (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Prerequisite(s): LAW 215. Practical approach to mergers and acquisitions, with an in-depth look at the planning, negotiation, documentation and completion of mergers and acquisitions. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 228BAccounting for Lawyers (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Exposes student to basic principles of accounting, from the perspective of the practicing attorney. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 228CLaw and Statistics (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Introduction to fundamentals of statistical analysis and how statistical analysis is used in the law and public policy. Course goal is to help students become excellent consumers of statistical information and evidence. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 229Scientific Evidence (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219. Limited enrollment. In addition to examining the evidence law governing the admission of scientific testimony, this course considers trial advocacy in presenting and attacking such testimony. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 230International Environmental Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Prior course work in environmental law and/or international law is helpful. Elective Course for Environmental Law Certificate Program. May satisfy Advanced Writing Requirement with professor's permission. Provides an overview of the structure and basic principles of international environmental law and policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 230AWine and the Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Surveys the legal landscape of this multi-billion dollar industry, focusing on contemporary debates and developments in judicial, legislative, and administrative arenas. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 230TFree Trade and the Environment (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Examines the relationship between legal rules relating to trade and rules for the protection of the environment. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 231Sex Based Discrimination (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Issues raised by legal and social distinctions between men and women. Explores potential remedies for discrimination drawn from constitutional law, statutory enactments, and common law developments. Subject matter areas include sex-based discrimination in constitutional law, family law, reproductive rights, educational (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Fall Semester.
LAW 231ASexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and the Law (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines the legal and social regulation of sexual orientation and gender identity. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 231ASexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and the Law (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Examines the legal and social regulation of sexual orientation and gender identity. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 232Real Estate Finance (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). An examination of the problems involved in the acquisition, financing, and development of real estate, and of lender remedies and debtor protections in the event of debtor default. The course stresses the practical application of California legal doctrines. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Semester.
LAW 232ATReal Estate Transactions (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Review of legal issues in the purchase, sale, financing of residential real estate in US, with non-exclusive focus on California. Roles of parties involved, mechanisms of financing and security, survey of remedies, and role of mortgage lending beginning in 2008. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 232TProperty Law & Race (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Seminar explores the extent to which property law (common law, federal, state, and local statutes, and administration regulations) historically impacted and currently shapes conceptions of race, racial groups, and racial relations. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 233Asylum and Refugee Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Course surveys U.S. and international law concerning refugees and asylum-seekers. This class will question the meaning of persecution, the definition of "particular social groups" in U.S. law, protections for gender-related violence, statutory bars to asylum, and U.S. refugee policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 234Sexual Orientation and the Law (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—2 hour(s). Examines the legal and social regulation of sexual orientation, emphasizing both the legal subordination of lesbians and gay men and the ongoing struggles to end that subordination. Sexual orientation issues in criminal, employment, constitutional, and family law will be covered. Materials will be both doctrinal and theoretical,and will include fiction and oral history as well as cases and statutes. (Letter.) Effective: 2001 Fall Semester.
LAW 234Drug Law and Policy (2) Review all entries Active
Seminar. Engage with the wide variety of policy and legal issues presented in the area of drug law and policy with a particular focus on one of the fastest-evolving fields in drug policy: marijuana law and policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 235Administrative Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines how the U.S. Constitution and the federal Administrative Procedure Act constrain and regulate decision making by government agencies and officials. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 235BCounseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age (2) Active
Lecture. Explores the complex challenges that entrepreneurs, businesses, and other organizations face when trying to address legal issues relating to technology. The seminar's approach is both practical and multidisciplinary, and it encourages students to explore the roles of a wide range of stakeholders (including lawyers, policy advocates and policymakers, businesspersons, and technologists) in developing legal and business strategies. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 236Securities Regulations (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215. Regulation of the distribution of securities under the Securities Act of 1933 and SEC Rules adopted there under, registration and reporting provisions of the 1934 Securities Exchange Act. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 236ASecurities Regulation I (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215; or Consent of Instructor. Legal rules and concepts applicable to business associations, both public and closely held. Corporate form of organization, partnerships and other associational forms. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 236BSecurities Regulation II (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215; or Consent of Instructor. LAW 236A recommended. Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the regulation of securities markets. Topics covered include regulation of securities markets and securities professionals, responsibilities of securities lawyers, continuous reporting, transnational securities fraud, and enforcement of the securities acts. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 236CSecurities Enforcement (3) Active
Lecture. Examines the civil and criminal enforcement of the securities laws by both the Securities and Exchange Commission and Justice Department. Surveys the administrative rules and investigative procedures that govern the SEC and the substantive related crimes. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 236CTSecurities Enforcement (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Examines civil and criminal enforcement of securities laws by both the Securities and Exchange Commission and Justice Department. Surveys administrative rules and investigative procedures that govern the SEC and the substantive related crimes. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 236CTSecurities Enforcement (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Examines civil and criminal enforcement of securities laws by both the Securities and Exchange Commission and Justice Department. Surveys administrative rules and investigative procedures that govern the SEC and the substantive related crimes. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 237Legal History (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Course traces the development of the common law from its origins in medieval England through the twentieth-century. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 237BSpecial Topics in Legal Theory: Ancient Athenian Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Athenian legal system was different from our own and was far less formal. How did it work? Why did it work? Why have political and legal theorists misunderstood Athens for so long and what can we learn from that failure? (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 239Mediation (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion/Laboratory—3 hour(s). Restricted to 24 students. Interactive course focuses on attorney representation of clients in mediation. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 239Mediation (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion/Laboratory—2 hour(s). Restricted to 24 students. Interactive course focuses on attorney representation of clients in mediation. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 240Reforming Campaign Finance Law and the Initiative Process (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Limited to 25 students. The recent election exposed many campaign finance and initiative issues. Focuses on reforms as well as the current law. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 240ALaw of the Political Process (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Covers many of the foundational issues in the "law of democracy," as that body of statutory and constitutional law has developed in the United States. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 241Voting Rights Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Seminar investigates the right to vote as a matter of constitutional and statutory law, with emphasis on the voting rights of racial and ethnic minorities. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 242Conflict of Laws (2) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Study of how law operates across state and national borders. Topics include choice of applicable law in transactions involving multiple jurisdictions, recognition of judgments, and the exercise of jurisdiction. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 242SSpecial Session Conflict of Laws (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Study of transactions with multi-state and international contracts. Topics include jurisdiction, recognition of foreign judgments, and choice of applicable law. Addresses problems that international lawyers encounter in a wide variety of deals with the emphasis on international commercial deals. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 243Commercial and Bankruptcy Law (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Remedies available to creditors to force payment, along with devices that creditors may use to give themselves priority against limited assets. Bankruptcy both as a means for providing funds for creditors and as a device for maximizing asset value. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 243ASecured Transactions (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Covers secured transactions (where a lender takes an interest in the debtor’s property as “collateral,” or security, for repayment of a loan) in personal property, such as auto loans and bank loans against business inventory. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 243BBankruptcy (3) Active
Seminar. Introduction to essentials of U.S. law governing bankruptcy of consumers and businesses. The course will address bankruptcy under Chapter 7, Chapter 13, and Chapter 11. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 243CAdvanced Bankruptcy Practice: Corporate Reorganization (2) Active
Lecture. Corporate chapter 11 bankruptcy under the Federal Bankruptcy Code and alternatives to corporate bankruptcy. Selection of venue. Formation of strategic objectives. Analysis of different professionals’ roles. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 243CTAdvanced Bankruptcy Practice (2) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—2 hour(s). Course will cover corporate chapter 11 and its alternatives and analyze different professionals’ roles. Selection of venue and formation of strategic objectives will also be discussed. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 243CTAdvanced Bankruptcy Practice (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—2 hour(s). Course will cover corporate chapter 11 and its alternatives and analyze different professionals’ roles. Selection of venue and formation of strategic objectives will also be discussed. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 245Corporate and White Collar Crime (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Covers the law of conspiracy, corporate criminal liability, mail and wire fraud, the Hobbs Act, RICO, money laundering, obstruction of justice, and other white collar crimes and their associated defenses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 245BDeath Penalty Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Offers overview of the constitutional law governing the death penalty in the United States. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Semester.
LAW 246Federal Jurisdiction (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 205. Study of subject-matter jurisdiction of federal courts. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 247Taxation of Partnerships and LLCs (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 220. Study of the federal income tax treatment of partnerships and partners; including entities classified as partnerships. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 247AInternational Aspects of U. S. Taxation (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 220 (can be concurrent); Completion or current enrollment in a course covering the domestic taxation of corporations is suggested but not required; Corporate Tax can be concurrent. Examine the U.S. income tax laws and policies related to the taxation of foreign income of U.S. persons and U.S. income of foreign persons. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 247BCorporate Tax (2) Review all entries Historical
Discussion/Laboratory—2 hour(s). Examination of the federal income tax relationship between corporations and their owners. Covers the transfer of funds into a corporation on formation and the re-transfer of money and property from the corporation to its shareholders. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 247BCorporate Tax (3) Review all entries Active
Discussion/Laboratory. Examination of the federal income tax relationship between corporations and their owners. Covers the transfer of funds into a corporation on formation and the re-transfer of money and property from the corporation to its shareholders. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 248Public International Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Introductory course covers basic international law concepts and the law-making process. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 248AJurisdiction in Cyberspace Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Review concepts in international law, conflicts of law, cyberlaw, and federal jurisdiction to address the growing multi-jurisdictional conflicts created by the Internet. Examine European efforts at crafting intra-Europe jurisdictional rules, as well as other international jurisdiction treaty projects such as (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 248BInternational Human Rights (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Introduces international human rights legal system through an examination of its historical origins and precursors and a review of its international legal backdrop, including the character and sources of international law, the UN Charter and the UN system. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 248CBusiness and Human Rights (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Explores the human rights responsibilities of businesses from legal, ethical, historical, and comparative perspectives. Equip students with the tools to be sensitive to human rights considerations as legal practitioners or in other fields of endeavor. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 248CAUnited Nations Human Rights Practicum I (2-3) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Opportunity to work in support of the mandate of the United Nations Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 248CBUnited Nations Human Rights Practicum II (2-3) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Build on the knowledge of the workings of the United Nations human rights system they gained in Practicum I, and gain further advanced experience working with UN documents, with individual cases in the field and with thematic reports. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 248DGlobalization and the Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Globalization of people, finance, goods, services, and information puts pressure on the nation-state form. In a world of diasporas and multinational corporations, what does citizenship mean? (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 248ETTransitional Justice and Memory Politics in the Asia-Pacific (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Transitional justice (legal responses to wrongdoings of repressive predecessor regimes) can help resolve “memory politics” that plague the relations and societies of many Asia-Pacific states. Together we will examine relevant roles of governments, novel institutions, the judiciary, and civil society. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 248GLegal Spanish for U.S. Lawyers (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Must satisfy one of the following: undergraduate degree in Spanish; a minor in Spanish with experience living in a Spanish-speaking country; grew up in a Spanish-speaking household and achieved proficiency; able to pass an informal assessment by the instructor. Designed for law students who are native Spanish-speakers or who have achieved proficiency in Spanish through study or experiences in a Spanish-speaking country. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 248TAdvanced International Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Review books of international law; Hugo Grotius and Judge Rosalyn Higgins. Themes include peaceful resolutions of dispute, law of war and peace, and international legal process. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 248TAHuman Rights in Post Soviet Central Asia: Legal Tools For Repression and Redress (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Provides a historical context for the current political and human rights situation in Central Asia. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 248TCInternational Economics Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examine the architecture of the international economic system, with a focus on both trade and investment. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 248TTTheories of International Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). International law, once critiqued as powerless and ineffective, is now challenged as a threat to American democracy. Introduction to competing theories of international law, including natural law, positivism, realism, liberalism, constructivism, fairness, legal process, and world public order. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 249Comparative Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). The uses of comparative method, principal differences between common law and civil law and the styles of legal reasoning that prevail in these two great legal cultures. Topics include the evolution of the civil law, the phenomenon of codification, the structure of European civil codes and the interpretation of their provisions, the respective roles of counsel, judges and law teachers, civil law procedure, and the analysis of selected areas of substantive law. Knowledge of a foreign language is not required. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 249SSpecial Session Comparative Law (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). This course will provide a comparative perspective for students of American law. After an initial look at the uses of the comparative method, discussions will be centered around the main differences between common law and civil law and the different styles of legal thinking. Topics to be covered will be the evolution of the civil law and the idea of codification, the structure of European civil codes and the interpretation of their provisions, the personnel of the law and procedure in civil law countries, and the analysis of selected problems of substantive law. Knowledge of a foreign language will not be required. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 250Jurisprudence Seminar (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Deals principally with the question of how judges should decide "hard cases," where the content of the law is in doubt and competent arguments have or could be offered for mutually inconsistent decisions in favor of either party. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 250AAoki Legal Scholarship Seminar (3) Active
Seminar. For students participating in the Aoki Center for Race and Nation Studies’ Immigration Law Journal. Research, and write a note on a topic related to immigration. Expectation is production of papers of publishable quality. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 250BWriting Requirement Workshop (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Second- and third-year students produce a piece of academic writing that satisfies the King Hall writing requirement and is of publishable quality. Receive feedback both from the instructor and from one another in a workshop setting. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 250TAsian American Jurisprudence (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Legal, social, and political discourse on race relations has traditionally been framed in Black-White terms. This course disrupts the traditional view by taking Asian Americans seriously. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 251Labor Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Survey of the legislative, administrative, and judicial regulation of labor relations under federal law. Historical development of labor law, the scope of national legislation, unions, strikes, picketing, and collective bargaining agreements. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 251TLabor Law I (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Restricted to students who previously took Labor Law in Fall 2008 may not enroll in Labor Law I. Survey of the legislative, administrative, and judicial regulation of labor relations under federal law. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 251TBLabor Law II (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 251T preferred; not required. Survey of the legislative, administrative, and judicial regulation of labor relations under federal law. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 252International Litigation and Arbitration (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Current developments in international law, conflict of laws, civil procedure, arbitration, and comparative law in the context of transactions and disputes that cut across national boundaries. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Semester.
LAW 253Policy Advocacy (2) Active
Lecture. In-depth examination of the legislative process both within the California Legislature and from the advocates’ perspective. Train in key policy advocacy skills by legislative leaders and social justice advocates. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 253ACommunity Lawyering (3) Active
Lecture. Study the need for community lawyering including the structural inequalities and privileges embedded in the legal system and society. Skills necessary for community lawyering as well as sites and models for practice will be examined. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 254Housing Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Survey course covers legal and policy issues related to developing, protecting and preserving affordable, safe and accessible housing and sustaining viable, diverse communities. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 254AWhite Working Class and the Law (2) Review all entries Historical
Seminar—2 hour(s). Considers the social, cultural, economic, and legal situation of low-income and/or low-education whites in contemporary U.S. society. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 254AWhite Working Class and the Law (2) Review all entries Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Considers the social, cultural, economic, and legal situation of low-income and/or low-education whites in contemporary U.S. society. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 254BAccess to Justice (2) Active
Seminar. Study of a variety of barriers that impede the access of unrepresented litigants to the courts--including poverty, racial bias, limited English proficiency and the digital divide--and critically examine existing solutions. Opportunity to develop and propose student's own solution to an access barrier. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 254TPracticum in Rural Community Advocacy (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Provides an opportunity to learn about Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods and community-­based lawyering in the context of rural community development and advocacy. Using these skills and knowledge to serve rural California communities. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 255Pension and Employee Benefits Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 220. Federal regulation and taxation of private pensions and employee benefits. This course will cover the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and Internal Revenue Code issues. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 256Land Use (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Local agencies, developers, environmental interest groups, and others who regularly deal with the administrative and legislative applications of land use planning and development laws. Topics include zoning, general plans, local government land use regulation, and related areas of litigation. The expanding role of the California Environmental Quality Act. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Spring Semester.
LAW 257Legislative Process (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Fundamental elements of the legislative process, including legislative procedure; the legislature as an institution; lobbying; statutory interpretation, legislative-executive relations; and the legislature's constitutional powers and limitations. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Spring Semester.
LAW 257ALegislative Intent Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Theories and principles of statutory and constitutional interpretation. Original intent vs. living constitution; permissible kinds of evidence for determining legislative intent; canons of construction; extent to which initiatives should be interpreted similarly to legislative enactments. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Fall Semester.
LAW 257BStatutory Interpretation (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Elective course for Environmental Law Certificate Program. Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of statutory interpretation. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 258Professional Responsibility (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Students who take LAW 258A are not eligible to enroll in this course. The ABA's Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct, which are tested on the MPRE, and the California Rules of Professional Conduct, which are tested on the California Bar Examination. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 258ALegal Ethics and Corporate Practice (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Students who take LAW 258 are not eligible to enroll in this course. Focus on corporate practice to explore the ethical responsibilities of lawyers. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 258BProfessional Responsibility (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—2 hour(s). Reviews the American Bar Association's Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct, as tested on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination, and covers California Rules of Professional Conduct, which are tested on the California Bar Examination. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 258BMindfulness and the Law (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Reviews the American Bar Association's Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct, as tested on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination, and covers California Rules of Professional Conduct, which are tested on the California Bar Examination. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 258BTMindfulness and Professional Identity (2) Review all entries Historical
Seminar—2 hour(s). Introduction to the practice of meditation and connect it with readings about the legal profession in three key areas. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 258BTMindfulness and Professional Identity (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Seminar—2 hour(s). Introduction to the practice of meditation and connect it with readings about the legal profession in three key areas. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 258CTThe Business of Lawyering (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Desired outcome is a thorough understanding of the business side of law practice and to promote an understanding of the relationship and balance between legal skills, business requirements of a practice, client needs and a work-life balance. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 258DTSetting Up and Maintaining Solo Law Practice (1) Active
Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction/overview of how to start a successful solo practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 258EUtility of Law School and Careers in the Law (1) Active
Lecture. Despite improvements in the economy, some observers continue to question whether law school is a viable option for college graduates. Considers the controversy and expose students to the variety of careers in the legal profession. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 258FPractice Ready Seminar (2) Active
Seminar. Includes a discussion and review of the role of the junior attorney within a law firm/legal department, professional goal-setting, strategies for effective communication and work within teams, delegation and resource management, organization and time management, an introduction to common junior-level assignments and how to complete them efficiently and effectively, building a professional network, and an introduction to business development, among other topics. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 259Feminist Legal Theory (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Provides an overview of feminist legal theory and considers how its various strands inform legislative and judicial law making. Satisfies Advanced Writing Requirement. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 259Feminist Legal Theory (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Provides an overview of feminist legal theory and considers how its various strands inform legislative and judicial law making. Satisfies Advanced Writing Requirement. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 259AWomen, Islam and the Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). This course will study legal and religious reform movements for women's rights within Muslim communities in the context of current scholarly and political debates about fundamentalism, democracy, equality, secularism, universalism, and multiculturalism. This is a limited enrollment seminar. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 259BWomen's Human Rights (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Overview of international legal and institutional system for the protection of women’s human rights from an academic perspective and the view of the practitioner. Includes the (CEDAW), violence against women, sexual and reproductive rights, economic rights, and more. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 259PWomen and the Law Practicum (1) Active
Discussion/Laboratory. Prerequisite(s): LAW 259 (can be concurrent). Complements the content of the feminist legal theory course by providing students the opportunity to consider how feminist theory may be used to inform law-making. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 260Employment Discrimination (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examine federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and § 1981. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 260AEmployment Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Provides an overview of employment law, labor law and employment discrimination law and aims to serve as a foundation for understanding the law and policy (statutory and common law) that surround the employer-employee relationship. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 261Judicial Process (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Examines a variety of issues concerning the judicial process. Focus is on judge's role in the legal process, the administration of justice, ethical issues, decision making, bias, and critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses in our current judicial system. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 262Antitrust (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Focus on the federal antitrust laws, concentrating on basic substantive areas of the Sherman and Clayton Acts. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 262ATUS Antitrust Law and Indian Competition Law: A Comparative Perspective (2) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Fundamental principles of Indian Competition Law and US Antitrust Law in a comparative perspective. The course will help American students, interested in future corporate law careers, to develop effective strategies for better managing cross border deals in India. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 262BRegulated Industries (2) Active
Seminar. Examines regulation of business in sectors, traditionally described as “common carrier” and “utility” industries, where because of market failures normal competitive mechanism will not protect consumers from exercises of market power. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 262CAntitrust and Intellectual Property (1) Active
Lecture. Explores the challenges antitrust law faces in protecting the innovation incentives of dynamic technology-led market competition, motivating and incentivizing companies to innovate and allowing them to retain the profits of such market growth. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 262SSpecial Session Antitrust (1) Active
Discussion. A study of the federal antitrust laws including price fixing, limits on distribution, tying arrangements, monopolization and mergers. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 263Criminal Trial Skills (4) Review all entries Historical
Seminar. Trial advocacy course centered on client relationship building, preparation for trial, and courtroom practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 263Criminal Trials: Theory and Practice (4) Review all entries Active
Seminar. Trial advocacy course centered on client relationship building, preparation for trial, and courtroom practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 263ATrial Practice (3) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s); Laboratory—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219 (can be concurrent). Limited enrollment. Introduction to the preparation and trial of cases, featuring lectures, videotapes, demonstrations, assigned readings and forensic drills. Laboratory held on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evening. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 263BAdvanced Trial Practice (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219; LAW 263A. Class limited to 40 students. Trains students on the organization and presentation of a complex trial, including pretrial preparation, jury selection, strategy considerations, evidentiary issues, and effective handling of plaintiff and defense cases through verdict. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 264Water Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Property rights in surface waters, including riparian rights, prior appropriation, and public rights use of water bodies; environmental constraints on exercise of water rights; groundwater rights and management; federal allocation and control of water resources; legal aspects of interstate allocation. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 264AOcean and Coastal Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Introduction to the goals and challenges of coastal and ocean policy; the complicated web of public and private interests in coastal lands and ocean waters; regulation of coastal development; domestic and international fisheries management; and preservation of ocean resources. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 265Natural Resources Law Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 285 or LAW 256 recommended, but not required. Restricted to 15 students. In-depth coverage of two foundational principles of natural resources law: public trust doctrine and private property rights protected under the Takings Clause of the U.S. and many state constitutions. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Spring Semester.
LAW 266ACyberlaw (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Emerging legal issues crucial to the conduct of business in cyberspace. Discussion of the evolution and current administration of the Internet and the World Wide Web. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 267Civil Rights Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Civil remedies for civil rights violations under the primary United States civil rights statute. Specifically, covers actions for constitutional and statutory violations under 42 USC §1983, affirmative defenses, and abstention doctrines. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 267BCivil Rights Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. The social, political, legal and historical factors which led to the creation of the United States Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) in 1957. The United States Commission on Civil Rights is a bipartisan, independent agency established by the Civil Rights Act. It is directed to investigate complaints alleging deprivations of the right to vote, and voter fraud; to study and collect information relating to discrimination and the denial of equal protection of the laws under the Constitution on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin; and submit reports, findings and recommendations to the President and to Congress. The role that the USCCR has played and continues to play in American politics, legislative enactments and the national dialogue on equality, fairness and justice in the context of civil and human rights. Satisfies Advanced Legal Writing Requirement. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Spring Semester.
LAW 268TSuing the Government: Civil Rights, Torts, Takings, and More (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Explores the basic requirements of suing government, including sovereign immunity, particular schemes for litigating against government (Federal Tort Claims Act, APA, False Claims Act, etc.), direct constitutional claims and the procedural pitfalls and remedies available against government. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 269Basic Finance for Lawyers (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Students with a non-law basic finance course will not be admitted, except with consent of instructor. Basic techniques of analysis that are part of the core curriculum in a good business school. Gives background necessary for understanding and advising your clients and for understanding other business-related law school courses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 269ATThe Financial Crisis: Law & Policy and Inequality (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Examines the regulation of financial intermediaries. The stated goal of regulation is to ensure systemic stability and to pursue consumer protection. We will ask whether there is an imbalance between systematic stability and consumer protection before the crisis of 2008. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 269BFinancial Regulation and Consumer Protection (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture. Examines efforts to ensure a “fair” financial marketplace, focusing on the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act and its creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and regimes enacted to protect consumers. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 269BConsumer Protection and Financial Regulation (3) Review all entries Active
Lecture. Examines efforts to ensure a “fair” financial marketplace, focusing on the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act and its creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and regimes enacted to protect consumers. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 269CCorporate Finance (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215 or concurrent enrollment recommended. Focus on how corporations raise money, stocks and bonds, etc.; how deals are structured and why corporations use one strategy instead of another. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 269DSeminar on Financial Regulation (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Introduction to the legal and regulatory issues presented by contemporary capital markets. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 269EPublic Finance (3) Active
Seminar. Introduction to the basic concepts of public finance, the underlying law governing public finance: in particular state law, federal tax law and federal securities law. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 270International Business Transactions (2) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Select legal problems arising from international business transactions. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 270International Business Transactions (3) Review all entries Active
Lecture/Discussion. Select legal problems arising from international business transactions. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 270ALife-Cycle Transactions and Drafting (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Business Associations and/or Trusts, Wills & Estates are recommended for enhanced comprehension. Class focuses on analysis of contract drafting design for various types of transactions and actual transactional documents typically encountered. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 270ALife-Cycle Transactions and Drafting (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Prerequisite(s): Business Associations and/or Trusts, Wills & Estates are recommended for enhanced comprehension. Class focuses on analysis of contract drafting design for various types of transactions and actual transactional documents typically encountered. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 270BTechnology Transactions (2) Active
Lecture. Practical overview of technology transactions, including licensing. In addition to substantive lectures, instruction via hypotheticals and scenarios to illustrate key issues in these transactions, drafting exercises, negotiation exercises, and group presentation exercises. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 270SSpecial Session International Business Transactions (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). A consideration of select legal problems arising from international business transactions. Topics include the international sales contract, letters of credit, transfers of technology, regulation of bribery, repatriation of profits, and national efforts to control imports. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 271Nonprofit Organizations and Drafting (4) Active
Extensive Writing/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215; or Consent of Instructor. Restricted to 13 students. Learn special legal rules and concepts applicable to non-profit organizations; particularly IRC 501(c)(3) nonprofits. Combination skills class and a lecture course. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 271ANonProfit Organizations: State and Local Governance Issues (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215 (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. Focuses on the state and local laws applicable to nonprofit organizations; i.e., public interest, cultural, religious, educational and other not-for-profit entities. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 271BNonprofit Organizations: Tax Exemptions & Taxation Focus (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 215; or Consent of Instructor. LAW 220 recommended. Focuses on the conceptual basis and substantive law criteria for the federal and state income tax exemption of nonprofit organizations. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Spring Semester.
LAW 271TNonprofit Organizations-Key Legal Topics (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Legal issues raised in operating and governing a nonprofit organization, primarily a public charity. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 272Family Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). An introduction to the legal regulation of the family. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 273AEducation Policy and the Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Topics include civil rights, inequality and the "right" to an education, bilingual education, school finance litigation, educational access, No Child Left Behind Act, Common Core Standards and charter schools. For students interested in educational policy and social regulatory policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 273BTSpecial Education Law and Policy (2) Active
Lecture. Introduction to the law of special education including the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and federal regulations governing special education law. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 274Intellectual Property (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Provides a broad survey of intellectual property law. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 274AInternational Intellectual Property and Development (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines international trade law, national customs law, intermediary liability rules, claims for rights in traditional knowledge and genetic resources, protections for geographical indications, technology transfer, and intellectual property piracy. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 274AInternational Intellectual Property and Development (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Examines international trade law, national customs law, intermediary liability rules, claims for rights in traditional knowledge and genetic resources, protections for geographical indications, technology transfer, and intellectual property piracy. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 274ASSpecial Session Intellectual Property (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). This course provides a broad survey of the field of intellectual property. Areas covered will include trademarks, patents, trade secrets, idea protection, unfair competition, and copyright. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 274BIntellectual Property Rights in Culture (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines effects of a burgeoning intellectual property regime on cultural conflict and formation. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 274BTrade Secrets (3) Review all entries Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Examines effects of a burgeoning intellectual property regime on cultural conflict and formation. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 274BTLaw of Trade Secrets and Restrictive Covenants (2) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—2 hour(s). Focus is on the law of trade secrets, including the Uniform Trade Secret Act (UTSA), restrictive covenants not to compete, and current case law developments in the areas of employee mobility and raids, and corporate espionage. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 274BTLaw of Trade Secrets and Restrictive Covenants (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—2 hour(s). Focus is on the law of trade secrets, including the Uniform Trade Secret Act (UTSA), restrictive covenants not to compete, and current case law developments in the areas of employee mobility and raids, and corporate espionage. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 274CTKnowledge Commons, Collaborative Authorship, Open Access (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Focuses on the increasingly global diffusion and success of collaborative forms of cultural and technoscientific production rooted in copyright-based licenses. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 274DIntellectual Property in Historical Context Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). How the legal system has adapted to earlier periods of rapid change by creating, delimiting, and expanding intellectual property rights (IPRs). Required paper satisfies advanced writing requirement. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 274ETIntellectual Property, Human Rights & Social Justice (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Course will examine the implications of copyright and patents for a broad set of social justice values, with particular emphasis on the interaction between intellectual property law and human rights law on the global stage. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 274FTCensorship in the Global Age (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Course examines from a globalized perspective a broad range of censorship issues, drawing from established cases and practices. This seminar attempts to identify a globally consistent set of theories that have gained traction in relevant regional or international debates. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 274GTRace, National Identity and Intellectual Properties (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Drawing upon methods taken from critical race theory, critical/cultural studies, and rhetoric this course addresses the relationships between intellectual properties and processes racial/national identity formation in the US, particularly as exemplified in legal, popular cultural, and political texts. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 274HTheory and History of Intellectual Property (2) Active
Seminar. Seminar traces development of intellectual property law in the U.S. and Europe because it is not possible to understand the logic and shape of current Intellectual Property concepts outside of their messy history. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 275Complex Litigation in a Civil Rights Context (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Study of the issues that frequently arise in large complex litigation involving multiple parties and multiple claims. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 275TAIntellectual Property Agreement Drafting for Biotech & Pharma (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper-division Business Law course or Intellectual Property course; priority given to students that have completed LAW 274. Covers the negotiation and drafting of intellectual property agreements common in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical arena. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 276Juvenile Justice Process (2) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Legal and philosophical bases of a separate juvenile justice process for crimes committed by minors. The role of counsel at each phase of the process is examined. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 277Federal Indian Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Focuses on legal relations between Native American tribes and the federal and state governments. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 277ATribal Justice (2) Active
Lecture. Examines the administration of justice within tribal governments and courts and the efforts of advocates to achieve justice for tribes through litigation, policy advocacy, public education, organizing, and inter-governmental collaboration. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 277TIndian Gaming Law Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—20 hour(s). Examines unique historical, political and legal context in which Indian tribes operate casinos, including impacts on tribal sovereignty, relations between tribes, states and local governments and changing relationships among the tribes themselves members, with particular reference to experience of California. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 278Pretrial Skills (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. This course uses role-playing exercises, videotaped simulations, and related projects to introduce students to lawyering skills basic to the practice of law, including client interviewing, witness interviewing and discovery, including depositions. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 279Legal Analysis (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Limited enrollment; for 2Ls only. Focuses on skills critical to law school success, and ultimately, bar exam success. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 280Advanced Legal Writing: Analytical & Persuasive Writing (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Develop essay writing skills and performance test drafting typically employed on the bar examination. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 280ATLegal Analysis (2) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—2 hour(s). Selected enrollment by permission of professor; 2L’s only. Focuses on skills critical to law school success, and ultimately, bar exam success. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 280ATLegal Analysis (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—2 hour(s). Selected enrollment by permission of professor; 2L’s only. Focuses on skills critical to law school success, and ultimately, bar exam success. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 280BProblem Solving and Analysis (2) Active
Lecture. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Restricted to third-year Law students only. Skills focused on the development of legal analytical and organizational methods essential to successful completion of the Performance Test component of the California Bar Exam (and other states), and, by extension, to success in the practice of law. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 281State and Local Government Law (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Topics include: federalism, relations between states and localities, governmental liability, zoning, educational equity, and public finance. Readings will be drawn not only from case law and statues, but from history, theory and public policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 281State and Local Government Law (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Topics include: federalism, relations between states and localities, governmental liability, zoning, educational equity, and public finance. Readings will be drawn not only from case law and statues, but from history, theory and public policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 282Energy Law Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). The history, law, and public policy of energy regulation in the United States with an emphasis on economic and environmental regulation. Competitive restructuring of the natural gas and electric utility industries emphasized. The basic regulatory schemes for other energy sources such as hydroelectric power, coal, oil, and nuclear power explored. Recommended to anyone who has an interest in the energy sector, various models of economic regulation, or regulated industries. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Semester.
LAW 282ARenewable Energy Seminar (2) Active
Seminar. Provides a broad overview of renewable energy law and policy with a particular focus on the California policy context. Topics include renewable electricity, California’s renewable portfolio standard, and project development. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 283Remedies (3) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Survey of modern American civil remedies law in both private and public law contexts. Topics include equitable remedies, equitable defenses, contempt power, injunctive relief, restitution, and money damages in torts and contracts. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 284Law and Economics (4) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—4 hour(s). Prior study of economics is not required. Introduces students to the economic analysis of law. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 284Law and Economics (3) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Introduces students to the economic analysis of law. Prior study of economics is not required. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 285Environmental Law (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Introduction to environmental law, focusing primarily on federal law. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 285ACalifornia Environmental Issues (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). The "Nation-state" of California has for many years been a national and global leader in environmental law and policy. Survey of key California environmental law and policy issues. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 285BTFood Justice (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Focus on the law and policy of the emerging "food justice movement," which combines the goals and principles of the environmental justice movement with some of the policy initiatives involved in "ethical consumption" and "sustainable agriculture" movements. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 285CFood and Agricultural Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Introduction to agricultural law, focusing on legal principles and issues at the forefront of contemporary debates about agriculture in society. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 285EClimate Change Law and Policy (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Addresses the legal and public policy dimensions of climate change, perhaps the most important environmental issue of our time. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 285FEnvironmental Justice (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Introduction to the field of environmental justice. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 285GEnvironmental Law Seminar: Emerging Technologies and the Environment (2) Active
Seminar. Examines legal regimes that might apply to various emerging technologies and consider governance mechanisms and reforms that might enable more foresighted and participatory development and management of technology. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 285HComparative Environmental Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Focus on Pacific Rim, examining factors, similarities/differences in countries environmental regulation and success of environmental law. Including information and market-based regulatory approaches; compliance and enforcement gaps; citizen and community mobilization; the role of legal institutions; variations in regulatory style. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 285TAEnvironmental Law Seminar: Emerging Technologies and the Environment (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Examines legal regimes that might apply to various emerging technologies and consider governance mechanisms and reforms that might enable more foresighted and participatory development and management of technology. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 286Health Care Law (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Addresses legal issues raised in general areas: access to health care and health care financing. Course materials and discussion focus on both public and private aspects of these issue areas. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 286ATopical Issues in Health Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. The course focuses on four-six issues at the interface of law, medicine, bioethics, and health policy that are currently the subject of major litigation, legislation, and/or contentious debate in the domains of bioethics and public policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 286BPublic Health Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Restricted to 15 students. Public health law, seen broadly, is the government's power and responsibility to ensure the conditions for the population's health. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 286CBioethics (3) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—3 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Course examines the ethical and legal issues that arise from biomedical research and use of medical technologies. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 286CBioethics (2) Review all entries Active
Discussion. Limited enrollment. Examines the ethical and legal issues that arise from biomedical research and use of medical technologies. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 286DLegal Psychology Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Examines how psychological theory and research can be used to shape laws and policies to make them better reflect what we know empirically about how individuals process information, make decisions and behave. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 286EReproductive Rights, Law, and Policy (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Addresses a variety of laws and practices that affect reproductive health and procreative decision making. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 287Public Land Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Legal aspects of federal land management, including the history of public land law, the scope of federal and state authority over the federal lands, and the allocation of public land resources among competing uses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 287APoverty Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Explore the theory and practice of law pertaining to the enactment and enforcement of laws regulating or aiding the poor and other disadvantaged persons. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 287TLaw and Society Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Study of law and society challenges traditional legal scholarship by exploring multiple ways in which law both shapes and is shaped by societies and social interactions. Seminar will introduce students to important literature and debates in the field. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 288Advanced Constitutional Law Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 218 (can be concurrent) or LAW 218A (can be concurrent). Limited enrollment. Seminar explores in-depth selected topics or problems in constitutional law and theory. The current focus will include diverse topics including abortion rights, the development of Second Amendment jurisprudence, and other subject areas. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Semester.
LAW 288AComparative Constitutional Law Seminar (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Seminar—2 hour(s). Understanding of constitutionalism and of the Constitution of the United States. Constitutional protection of individual rights and the structure of constitutions. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 288APresidential Powers Seminar (2) Review all entries Active
Seminar. Explores the Constitutional powers of the President in Article II and how they intersect with Congressional power. Emphasis on executive and legislative power, executive orders, appointment and removal powers, executive privilege and immunity, pardons, impeachment, Congressional investigations, independent and special counsels, and the 25th Amendment. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 288BSupreme Court Simulation Seminar (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Take on the role of Justices of, and advocates before, the Supreme Court of the United States. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 289ABiotechnology Law and Policy (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Coverage includes the regulation of biotechnology research, including restrictions on cloning and fetal stem cell research; regulation of the products of biotechnology to protect human health or the environment, including restrictions on use or distribution of genetically modified organisms; the (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 290International Trade Dispute Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). The WTO and other regional trading agreements, particularly the NAFTA, provide mechanisms for resolution of trade disputes. Students are introduced to economic, political, and legal theories underlying establishment of such bodies. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 290ATPrivacy, Surveillance, and “Sousveillance” (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Issues of privacy and surveillance are important to businesses, governments and citizens. Surveillance raises issues of autonomy and the abuse of power. “Sousveillance,” (citizen holds the camera), is a mechanism for rooting out corruption and exposing individuals to societal scrutiny. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 290BTSurveillance and States (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Examines the tensions between democracy and the rise of government power entailed by the growth of state surveillance, United States surveillance law and practice, and surveillance law and practice across the world. Also considers international legal constraints on government surveillance. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Summer Semester.
LAW 290CInformation Privacy Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Criminal Procedure strongly recommended. Examine several topics that arise in field of information privacy law, with a special emphasis on law enforcement access to this information. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 290TInternational Trade Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Review existing landscape of trade regulation from the World Trade Organizations, to regional organizations such as NAFTA, ASEAN, and the European Union. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Semester.
LAW 291AInternational Finance (4) Active
Discussion—4 hour(s). Money makes the world go round. We will try to follow that money, learning how a framework of national and international laws and institutions regulates (or perhaps fails to regulate) its flow. (Letter.) Effective: 2009 Fall Semester.
LAW 291BInternational Investment Dispute Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). This seminar will examine the law of investor-State dispute resolution. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 291TInternational Arbitration and Investment Law (2) Active
Lecture. Covers international arbitration involving States, individuals, and corporations; including: the parties; the agreement to arbitrate; the arbitrators; the arbitral proceeding; and, the arbitral award. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 292Immigration Law and Procedure (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Surveys the history of U.S. immigration law and policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Spring Semester.
LAW 292AAdvanced Topics in Immigration and Citizenship Law Seminar (2) Active
Lecture. Prerequisite(s): LAW 292; May be waived by the professor. Conducts a closer examination of various topics and subject matters that relate to immigration and citizenship law. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 293Public Interest Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). This class will examine the issues and problems associated with providing civil legal services to persons and interests in American society that typically have been unable to afford or otherwise obtain representation from the private bar. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 293ATContemporary Issues in Economic Justice (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Provides an introduction to the social justice critique of free markets. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Spring Semester.
LAW 293TPublic Interest Lawyering, Civil Rights and Employment Law (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 260; LAW 260AT. Advanced course covers employment law issues through the lens of public interest lawyers and their constituencies. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 294ALaw and Popular Culture (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). This course examines works of popular culture, films, and legal texts. Each session will focus on a particular film and its cultural implications, particular problem or problems of law, law practice, legal ethics, traditional ethics, or public policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Spring Semester.
LAW 294BVideo Game Law (2) Active
Lecture. Focuses primarily on intellectual property law through the lens of video game-related litigation, and addresses the ways in which video games and the video game industry shape law and society. Addresses the video game business, the structure and form of video-game-related legal transactions, and other current legal issues surrounding video games. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 295ATrademark and Unfair Competition Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 274 recommended, not required. Intensive look at selected issues in Trademark Law, including the concepts of trademarks and unfair competition, acquisition and loss of trademark rights, infringement, trademarks as speech, and international aspects of trademark protection. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 295BUniversity Brands (3) Active
Lecture. Universities gain from developing brands, to draw donors and students and lend prestige to a range of activities – merchandise, publishing, technology transfer, continuing education, hospitals, distance learning, etc. Whether private, public, elitist, or inclusive, the university can no longer avoid to brand itself. Discusses the role of trademarks in the university and changes affecting it. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 295TBrands and Trademarks (2) Review all entries Historical
Seminar—2 hour(s). Explores the challenges brands pose to traditional trademark law. Taking a close, interdisciplinary look at branding: from the business schools’ theories of brand management to semiotic analyses of brand meaning to art criticism of brand advertisements. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 295TBrands (3) Review all entries Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Takes a close, interdisciplinary look at branding. Preparation to understand modern branding strategies and the challenges such strategies may pose to traditional trademark law and policy. Topics include merchandising rights, unfair competition, and counterfeits. (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Spring Semester.
LAW 296Copyright (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Thorough examination of the law of copyright, including its application to literature, music, films, television, art, computer programs, and the Internet. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 296CFictional Characters and Real People (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Celebrities and fictional characters both have a powerful hold on the human imagination and are important parts of our modern myths. Examines the legal protection available for each. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Spring Semester.
LAW 296DArt Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Selected issues in Art Law, including meaning of art, how to represent artists, copyright, publicity, first amendment rights, censorship, street art, government regulation, art markets, international protection of art and cultural property; and more. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 296TEntertainment Law (2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Explores the many facets of Entertainment Law. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Semester.
LAW 297Alternative Dispute Resolution (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Introduces students to a wide variety of alternative dispute resolution procedures, with an emphasis on negotiation, mediation and arbitration. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 297AFederal Arbitration Act Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Trace the development of commercial arbitration law, with a special emphasis on hot-button contemporary issues like consumer and employment arbitration, the separability doctrine, preemption of state law, and the arbitrability of statutory claims. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 297BTInternational Commercial Arbitration (3) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). International commercial arbitration, Convention on International Sale of Goods, general understanding of international arbitration provided by World Bank's International Centre for Settlement of Investor-State Disputes under Convention on Settlement of Investment Disputes between States and Nationals of Other States. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 298Sociology of the Legal Profession Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Comprehensive look at the organization, operation, and ideology of the legal profession. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Semester.
LAW 400AStudy Abroad - University College Dublin, Ireland (12) Active
Independent Study. Students must apply and be accepted into the International Study Abroad Program. Semester away study abroad at the University College Dublin, Ireland. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2008 Spring Semester.
LAW 400BStudy Abroad--University of Cophengen, Denmark (12) Active
Independent Study. Students must apply and be accepted into the International Study Abroad Program. Semester study abroad at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2008 Spring Semester.
LAW 400CStudy Abroad - China University of Political Science and Law (12) Active
Independent Study. Student must apply and be acceptance in the International Study Abroad Program. Semester-away study abroad at the China University of Political Science and Law. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2009 Spring Semester.
LAW 400DStudy Abroad - University of Lausanne, Switzerland (12) Active
Independent Study. Student must apply and be accepted in the International Study Abroad Program. Semester-away study abroad at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2013 Fall Quarter.
LAW 400EStudy Abroad-Comillas Pontifical University Madrid, Spain (12) Active
Independent Study. Semester-away study abroad at the Comillas Pontifical University in Madrid, Spain. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 400FStudy Abroad - Université Paris Nanterre, Paris (12) Active
Seminar. Student must apply and be accepted in the International Study Abroad Program. Semester-away study abroad at the Universite Paris Nanterre, Paris. Enhance knowledge of international legal regimes and obtain a global legal educational experience. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Semester.
LAW 400SCritical Topics in Environmental Law in a Comparative Perspective (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Enrollment by application only. Intensive, two-week program provides an opportunity for U.S. and international law students to study environmental law by examining and comparing European Union and U.S. environmental law policies and regulatory regimes. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Summer Semester.
LAW 408Community Education Seminar (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Clinical Activity. Limited enrollment. Trains students to educate the community about basic legal rights and responsibilities. Students attend an initial four-hour orientation, followed by weekly seminars that will prepare students to teach in a local high school at least two times per week. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 409Environmental Law Moot Court (1) Active
Variable. During the first eight weeks of fall semester, students research and submit briefs as appellants, respondents, or third parties on a problem of environmental law that is prepared by the National Environmental Law Moot Court Board. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 410AAppellate Advocacy I (2) Active
Discussion/Laboratory. Limited enrollment. Basic appellate practice and procedure. Beginning instruction in oral advocacy skills and an opportunity to practice these skills in front of a moot court. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 410BAppellate Advocacy II (Moot Court) (2) Active
Practice—2 hour(s). Limited enrollment. Continuation of Course 410A. Focuses on the development of effective appellate brief writing skills and the refinement of oral advocacy skills. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2008 Fall Semester.
LAW 411Journal of International Law and Policy (1-2) Active
Independent Study. The Journal is a biannual journal produced by King Hall students with an interest in international law. The editor -in-chief of the journal receives 2 units of credit each semester. The managing editor receives 1 unit of credit each semester. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 411AJournal of International Law and Policy (1-2) Active
Variable—1-2 hour(s). The UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy publishes semi-annually and strives to contribute pertinent and interesting scholarly works to the field of international law. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s) Students are allowed to participate in the journal for more than one term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 411BJournal of Juvenile Law and Policy (1-2) Active
Independent Study—1-2 hour(s). The Journal of Juvenile Law & Policy is a biannual publication of the UC Davis School of Law that addresses the unique concerns of youth in the American legal system. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s) Students are allowed to participate in the journal for more than one term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 411CUC Davis Business Law Journal (1-2) Active
Independent Study—1 hour(s). The UC Davis Business Law Journal is run by dedicated law students who are committed to providing current and valuable legal and business analysis. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s) Students are allowed to participate in the journal for more than one term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 411DImmigration and Nationality Law Review (1-2) Active
Independent Study. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. The Immigration and Nationality Law Review (INLR) is in part a reprint journal and serves as an anthology of seminal articles in immigration, nationality, and citizenship law. INLR has republished a number of articles authored by King Hall faculty. INLR also creates space for student Notes. The INLR also hosts a symposium or other immigration-related project each year and publishes materials from that enterprise in the year’s volume. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s) Students are allowed to participate in the journal for more than one term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 412Carr Intraschool Trial Advocacy Competition (1) Active
Variable. Limited enrollment. Named after the late Justice Frances Carr, this competition is open to secondand third-year students. A preliminary round is followed by quarter-finals,semi-finals,and a final round. Students participate in mock trials presided over by judges and critiqued by experienced litigators. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 413Interschool Competition (1-3) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of appropriate faculty advisor. Limited to students actually representing the School in the interschool competitions. Participation in interschool moot court and lawyering skills competitions. Competition must be authorized by the appropriate faculty advisor. Faculty advisor may condition the award of academic credit for any particular competition on the performance of such additional work as may be reasonable to justify the credit. May satisfy advanced legal writing requirement (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 414Moot Court Board (1) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): LAW 410A; LAW 410B. Limited enrollment. Members of Moot Court Board may receive one credit for each semester of service on the board, up to maximum of two.Credit awarded only after certification by Moot Court Board and approval of the faculty advisors to Moot Court Board. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 414ANegotiations Board (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Members of the King Hall Negotiations Board assist in the administration of the King Hall Negotiation Team by performing a variety of tasks under the supervision of the course instructor. One unit of credit for each semester of service on the board, up to a maximum of two units per academic year; credit is awarded only after approval by the instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 415Trial Practice Honors Board (1) Active
Variable. Members of the Trial Practice Honors Board administer the Frances Carr competition. Members are nominated by their individual Trial Practice I adjuncts. Students receive one credit for serving on the Board, awarded upon approval of the faculty advisor. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 416Law Review Writer (1-2) Active
Variable—1-2 hour(s). Writing of a law review article under the editorial supervision of editors of the UC Davis Law Review. Office hours (including but not limited to Bluebooking and cite-checking) are required. 1 or 2 units. May be repeated for credit. In the spring semester, credit is obtained only upon achieving status as a member of the UC Davis Law Review, which requires that the student has made substantial progress towards completing an editorship article; credit is awarded only after certification by the editor in chief and approval of the faculty advisors; one unit of credit is earned the first semester; two units are earned the second semester upon nomination and acceptance of nomination to the Editorial Board; one unit is earned second semester if only a membership draft and office hours are completed. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 417ALaw Review Editor (1-2) Active
Variable—1-2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Editors must have completed an editorship article and must perform editorial duties (a substantial time commitment). Credit is awarded only after completion of both semesters. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2015 Fall Semester.
LAW 417BLaw Review Editor (1-2) Active
Variable—1-2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Editors must have completed an editorship article and must perform editorial duties (a substantial time commitment). Credit is awarded only after completion of both semesters. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Spring Semester.
LAW 418Environmental Law and Policy Journal (1-2) Active
Independent Study. Environs is a biannual environmental law and policy journal that provides an open forum for the discussion of current environmental issues, particularly those pertaining to the state of California. May be repeated up to 5 Time(s) Students are allowed to participate in the journal for more than one term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 419Advanced Writing Project (1-4) Active
Variable. The completion of a writing requirement project under the active and regular supervision of a faculty member in satisfaction of the legal writing requirement. The writing project must be an individually authored work of rigorous intellectual effort of at least 20 typewritten double-spaced pages, excluding footnotes. The project may take any of several forms, for example, a paper, a brief, a memorandum of law, a proposed statute, a statutory scheme or set of administrative regulations (with explanatory comments), or a will or agreement (with explanatory comments). The advanced writing project may also be undertaken in connection with another course or seminar to satisfy the leagl writing requirements. The numnber of units shall be approved by the faculty supervisor and will depend upon the scope of the writing effort. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 419AAdvanced Writing Project (1-4) Active
Variable. The completion of a writing requirement project under the active and regular supervision of a faculty member in satisfaction of the legal writing requirement. The writing project must be an individually authored work of rigorous intellectual effort of at least 20 typewritten double-spaced pages, excluding footnotes. The project may take any of several forms, for example, a paper, a brief, a memorandum of law, a proposed statute, a statutory scheme or set of administrative regulations (with explanatory comments), or a will or agreement (with explanatory comments). The advanced writing project may also be undertaken in connection with another course or seminar to satisfy the legal writing requirements. The number of units shall be approved by the faculty supervisor and will depend upon the scope of the writing effort. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 419SSpecial Session Advanced Writing Project (1-4) Active
Variable. The completion of a writing requirement project under the active and regular supervision of a faculty member in satisfaction of the legal writing requirement. The writing project must be an individually authored work of rigorous intellectual effort of at least 20 typewritten double-spaced pages, excluding footnotes. The project may take any of several forms, for example, a paper, a brief, a memorandum of law, a proposed statute, a statutory scheme or set of administrative regulations (with explanatory comments), or a will or agreement (with explanatory comments). The advanced writing project may also be undertaken in connection with another course or seminar to satisfy the legal writing requirements. The number of units shall be approved by the faculty supervisor and will depend upon the scope of the writing effort. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 420Civil Rights Clinic (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Priority given to students enrolled in or have taken LAW 267. Limited enrollment. Clinic provides practical experience in providing legal services to indigent clients who have filed civil rights actions in state and federal trial and appellate courts. Students work on clinic cases under the supervision of the clinic director. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 425Judicial Clinical (2-12) Active
Clinical Activity. Prerequisite(s): LAW 261; Required for full-time clinical students and recommended for part-time clinical students. Students may arrange judicial clerkship clinical programs with an approved list of state and federal judges through the Clinical office and under the sponsorship of the faculty member in charge. All students must complete weekly time records and bi-weekly journals. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
LAW 430Federal and State Taxation Externship (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity—2-12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 220; and Consent of Instructor. Students will have the opportunity to work with the Internal Revenue Service or other governmental tax agency. Journals and attendance at group meetings are required. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 435Family Protection Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219 (can be concurrent); Full–Year Clinic: prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 219 to qualify for state court certification; prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 272 and LAW 263A recommended, not required; One-Semester Clinic: prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 272 and LAW 263A recommended, not required. Full–Year Clinic: each student required to enroll for two semesters, receiving four units each semester for total of eight units; class limited to seven students; One-Semester Clinic: each student required to meet weekly for a 2-hour seminar; class limited to four students. Represent low-income persons in family law and related matters arising out of situations involving family violence. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 435AFamily Protection Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219 (can be concurrent); Consent of Instructor. Full-Year Clinic: LAW 219 is required to qualify for state court certification; prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 272 and LAW 263A recommended not required. One-Semester Clinic: prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 272 and LAW 263A recommended not required. Full–Year Clinic: each student required to enroll for two semesters receiving four units each semester for total of eight units; class limited to seven students. Represent low-income persons in family law and related matters arising out of situations involving family violence. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 435BFamily Protection Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Full-Year Clinic: LAW 219 is required to qualify for state court certification; prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 272 and LAW 263A recommended not required. Full–Year Clinic: each student required to enroll for two semesters receiving four units each semester for total of eight units; class limited to seven students. Represent low-income persons in family law and related matters arising out of situations involving family violence. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 440AImmigration Law Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 292 (can be concurrent). Each student is required to enroll for two semesters, receiving four units each semester for total of eight units. Provides legal representation to indigent non-citizens in removal proceedings before U.S. Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and federal courts, including the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 440BImmigration Law Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 292 (can be concurrent); Consent of Instructor. Each student is required to enroll for two semesters, receiving four units each semester for total of eight units. Provides legal representation to indigent non-citizens in removal proceedings before U.S. Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and federal courts, including the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 445Legislative Process Externship (2-5) Active
Clinical Activity. Prerequisite(s): LAW 240 (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. Practical experience in the operation of the office of a legislator or a legislative committee. The major thrust of the program is to enable students to become familiar with the give and take realities of making laws, as contracted with (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2001 Spring Semester.
LAW 445AAoki Water Justice Clinic (5) Active
Clinical Activity. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Aoki Water Justice Clinic trains students to use community lawyering and transactional legal tools to ensure that low-income, California communities receive safe, clean, and affordable drinking water. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 445BAdvanced Aoki Water Justice Clinic (3-5) Active
Variable. The Advanced Aoki Water Justice Clinic allows students to leverage their legal research and practical lawyering skills to advance policies that ensure that low-income, California communities receive safe, clean, and affordable drinking water. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Semester.
LAW 446UC Davis Capital Law Scholars Externship Program (2-12) Active
Fieldwork. Program is designed to provide students with hands-on lawyering experience in a legislative office, with a legislative committee, or with a government/nonprofit office engaged in legislative and policy work. Grading is on a S/U basis. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 446AUC Davis Capital Law Scholars Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). May be required for students enrolled in Capital Law Scholars Externship. Covers issues related to lawyering in California’s state capital, and help students maximize educational and professional experience in their externship placements. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Semester.
LAW 450Environmental Law Externship (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity. Prerequisite(s): LAW 285; or Consent of Instructor. Practical experience in environmental law. Students will work in an approved government, non-profit or private law office engaged in some form of environmental law work for a minimum of 8 hours per week. Students must prepare a journal describing and (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2004 Spring Semester.
LAW 455Employment Relations Externship (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity. Prerequisite(s): LAW 251 or LAW 260 (can be concurrent). Practical experience in employment relations, including employment discrimination and public sector labor law. Work under the direct supervision of a government lawyer. Opportunity to participate in a range of with emphasis on observation and participation in actual investigation, interviewing, drafting pleading, and attendance at hearings. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2003 Fall Semester.
LAW 460Public Interest Law Externship (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity—2-6 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 293 recommended. Opportunity to work with a public interest practitioner in a nonprofit organization. Journals and attendance at two group meetings required. Students must complete an evaluative final paper of approximately eight pages. Hours completed in public interest setting may be applied toward the practicum requirement for the Public interest Law Program. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2002 Fall Semester.
LAW 465Intellectual Property Externship (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity—2-6 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 293 and Comparative Public Services recommended. Opportunity to work for government, academic, and nonprofit entities. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 470Administration of Criminal Justice Externship (2-12) Active
Clinical Activity—2-12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): LAW 219; and LAW 227; Completion of or concurrent enrollment in the above courses; LAW 263A recommended. Limited enrollment. Gain practical experience working full or part time in a District Attorney’s or Public Defender’s office in one of several surrounding counties or in a federal Public Defender or U.S. Attorney’s office. Students participate in the many activities associated with May be repeated up to 12 Unit(s). (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 475Washington UC-DC Law Program (10) Active
Clinical Activity—10 hour(s). Open to 2L and 3L students. Uniquely collaborative externship program in Washington, D.C., combining weekly seminars with full-time field placement offering students an unparalleled opportunity to learn how federal statutes, regulations, and policies are made, changed, and understood in the nation's capital. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 475ALaw Making and Law Changing in the Nation's Capital (3) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s). Companion seminar to the Washington UC-DC Externship. Designed to enhance the externship experience in three principal ways. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Semester.
LAW 480Clinical Program in Prison Law (2-6) Active
Clinical Activity—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Provides practical experience in providing legal services to real clients who have various problems related to their incarceration in state prison. The services require analysis and application of Constitutional Law, state statutory law, agency regulations, and the rules of professional responsibility. (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Semester.
LAW 485California Supreme Court Clinic (6) Active
Clinical Activity—6 hour(s). Class size limited to 6 students. California Supreme Court Clinic provides students with an immersive experience in litigating cases before the state’s highest court. (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Semester.
LAW 490TAoki Federal Public Defender Clinic (4) Active
Clinical Activity—4 hour(s). Students submit applications for the course. Outgrowth of the work of the Aoki Center on Race and Nation. As part of its work, the Aoki Center provides educational opportunities to students interested in critical race perspectives in practice. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Fall Semester.
LAW 495Instruction in Legal Research and Writing Skills (1-2) Active
Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Participants assist in instructing the Legal Research and Writing programs for first-year students under the direction of the Legal Research and Writing instructors. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Spring Semester.
LAW 498Group Study (1-4) Active
Variable—1-4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Class size limited to no fewer than 4 or more than 10 students. Groups of students with common interest in studying a stated legal problem may plan and conduct their own research and seminar program under the direction of faculty. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 498AGroup Study (1-4) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Groups of students with common interest in studying a stated legal problem may plan and conduct their own research and seminar program under the direction of faculty. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Semester.
LAW 499Independent Research Project (1-4) Active
Variable. Students may receive credit for individual projects, subject to the following regulations: (1) the project may extend over no more than two semesters; (2) each project will be under the supervision of a faculty member; (3) an outline of the project must be approved by the supervising faculty member; (4)normally, no faculty member will be permitted to supervise more than 5 students working on individual programs during any semester; and (5)each student must submit an individual paper or approved alternative to the supervising faculty member. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2005 Fall Semester.
LAW 499AIndependent Research Project (1-4) Active
Variable. Students may receive credit for individual projects, subject to the following regulations: (1)the project may extend over no more than two semesters; (2)each project will be under the supervision of a faculty member; (3) an outline of the project must be approved by the supervising faculty member; (4)normally, no faculty member will be permitted to supervise more than 5 students working on individual programs during any semester; and (5)each student must submit an individual paper or approved alternative to the supervising faculty member. Grading is on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis unless a request for letter grading has been made in advance. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2010 Fall Semester.
LAW 499BLaw Students Study Away (10) Active
Independent Study. Students studying away from UC Davis, School of Law. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2007 Fall Semester.
LAW 499CJoint Degree Student-GSM (10) Active
Internship. Joint degree course for graduate School of Management students. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2009 Spring Semester.
LAW 499SSpecial Independent Research Project (1-4) Active
Students may receive credit for individual projects, subject to the following regulations: (1) the project may extend over no more than two semesters; (2) each project will be under the supervision of a faculty member; (3) an outline of the (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 499SASpecial Session Independent Research Project (1-4) Active
Students may receive credit for individual projects, subject to the following regulations: (1) the project may extend over no more than two semesters; (2) each project will be under the supervision of a faculty member; (3) an outline of the (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.
LAW 499SBSpecial Session Independent Research Project (1-4) Active
Variable. Students may receive credit for individual projects, subject to the following regulations: (1) the project may extend over no more than two semesters; (2) each project will be under the supervision of a faculty member; (3) an outline of the project must be approved by the supervising faculty member; (4) normally, no faculty member will be permitted to supervise more than 5 students working on individual programs during any semester; and (5) each student must submit an individual paper or approved alternative to the supervising faculty member. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Summer Special Session.