Immunology

Charles Bevins, M.D., Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1026 Vet Med Administration Building; 530-754-0103; http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/

Faculty. http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty.html


Charles Bevins, M.D., Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1026 Vet Med Administration Building; 530-754-0103; http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/

Faculty. http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty.html

Graduate Study. The Graduate Group in Immunology offers an interdisciplinary program of study in an exciting field of biology and medicine leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Participating faculty from various Schools and Departments at UC Davis provide research opportunities in diverse areas of applied immunology. Areas of focus include infection and immunity (including host response regulation to parasites, viruses and bacteria), nutrition and immunity, autoimmunity, immune regulation, neuroimmunology, cancer therapy and immune mediators and their uses for diagnosis and treatment.

Preparation. Applicants for candidacy to these programs should have completed undergraduate preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology or related biological and medical sciences.

For work leading to the Ph.D. degree, the requirements include cell biology, chemical immunology, cellular immunology, immunohematology, and advanced immunology. In addition to these general requirements, more specialized preparation in at least one of the following is required: (a) microbiological specialties (bacteriology, virology, parasitology, medical microbiology); (b) zoological specialties (cell biology, endocrinology, embryology, proto-zoology, histology, cytology, physiology); (c) medical specialties (pathology, anatomy, pharmacology, clinical pathology, reproduction, hematology, epidemiology); (d) biochemistry/biophysics specialties (biologically active molecules, control mechanisms); (e) genetic specialties (developmental genetics, population genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics).

Graduate Advisor. See the graduate program website at http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/people/.

Charles Bevins, M.D., Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1026 Vet Med Administration Building; 530-754-0103; http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/

Faculty. http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty.html

Graduate Study. The Graduate Group in Immunology offers an interdisciplinary program of study in an exciting field of biology and medicine leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Participating faculty from various Schools and Departments at UC Davis provide research opportunities in diverse areas of applied immunology. Areas of focus include infection and immunity (including host response regulation to parasites, viruses and bacteria), nutrition and immunity, autoimmunity, immune regulation, neuroimmunology, cancer therapy and immune mediators and their uses for diagnosis and treatment.

Preparation. Applicants for candidacy to these programs should have completed undergraduate preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology or related biological and medical sciences.

For work leading to the Ph.D. degree, the requirements include cell biology, chemical immunology, cellular immunology, immunohematology, and advanced immunology. In addition to these general requirements, more specialized preparation in at least one of the following is required: (a) microbiological specialties (bacteriology, virology, parasitology, medical microbiology); (b) zoological specialties (cell biology, endocrinology, embryology, proto-zoology, histology, cytology, physiology); (c) medical specialties (pathology, anatomy, pharmacology, clinical pathology, reproduction, hematology, epidemiology); (d) biochemistry/biophysics specialties (biologically active molecules, control mechanisms); (e) genetic specialties (developmental genetics, population genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics).

Graduate Advisor. See the graduate program website at http://immunology.compmed.ucdavis.edu/people/.

Courses in IMM:
IMM 201Introductory Immunology (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Comprehensive introduction to the principles of immunology. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Fall Quarter.
IMM 201LAdvanced Immunology Laboratory Rotations (4) Active
Discussion/Laboratory—12 hour(s). Laboratory assignment in two research laboratories. Individual research problems with emphasis on methodological/procedural experience and experimental design. Student writes a project outline and gives oral presentation. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
IMM 202LAdvanced Immunology Laboratory Rotations (5) Active
Discussion/Laboratory—15 hour(s). One four-week and one six week assignment in immunology research laboratories. Individual research problems with an emphasis on methodological/procedural experience and experimental design. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
IMM 203Cancer Immunology (2) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Covers concepts in cancer biology, progression and immune evasion. It will also cover topics such as: immune surveillance, immune effector mechanisms and current concepts in immune therapy. (Letter.) Effective: 2011 Fall Quarter.
IMM 204Topics in Innate Immunity (2) Active
Extensive Writing/Discussion—1 hour(s); Performance Instruction—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): IMM 201; Or equivalent; IMM 293 preferred. Restricted to first- or second-year GGI and MGG students; others with permission of instructor; enrollment limited to 18 students. Covers current topics in the field of innate immunity through student seminar presentations and critical evaluation of the literature. Concepts include: pathogen recognition, intercellular communication, specialized cellular function and effector/signaling molecules. (Letter.) Effective: 2010 Spring Quarter.
IMM 210Topics on Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Topics will include a broad range of frontiers in neuroimmunology and neuroinflammation. Research articles in current literature will serve to guide in-depth discussions of experimental approaches, technical aspects of experimental techniques, data interpretation, and other relevant aspects of each topic. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Winter Quarter.
IMM 291Introduction to Critical Analysis of Immunology Research Literature (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): IMM 201 (can be concurrent); or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to critical reading of primary research papers in Immunology. Guided discussions on recent primary research papers provided to students before each class. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
IMM 292Immunotoxicology Seminar (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Pharmacology/Toxicology, Immunology, Physiology, or Biochemistry. Seminar presentations dealing with principles of xenobiotic effects on immune system functions and specific examples of drugs and environmental chemicals exerting toxic effects on the immune system. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
IMM 293Current Concepts in Immunology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PMI 126; or Consent of Instructor. Innate and acquired immunity as defense mechanisms against disease. Mechanisms regulating the distinct cell types driving these responses and current concepts in the literature. (Letter.) Effective: 2002 Winter Quarter.
IMM 294Comparative Clinical Immunology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PMI 126; or Consent of Instructor. Clinical immunology in animals and man. Pathogenesis of representative infectious diseases, hypersensitive reactions, and autoimmunity. Emphasis on specific and nonspecific immune effector mechanisms to combat infections or mediate pathology.   Not open for credit to students who have completed IMM 294A. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Winter Quarter.
IMM 295Cytokines (3) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): IMM 293; or Consent of Instructor. Cytokines and their involvement in human and animal physiology/disease, molecular mechanisms and receptor signaling. Immune and non-immune actions. Overlapping/redundant functions (referred to as the "cytokine network"). (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Spring Quarter.
IMM 296Advanced Topics in Immunology (2) Review all entries Historical
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Presentation, discussion, and analysis of faculty research topics in immunology. Required for Immunology Graduate Students every year until they have passed their qualifying exam. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2002 Winter Quarter.
IMM 296Advanced Topics in Immunology (1) Review all entries Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of faculty research topics in Immunology May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
IMM 297Mucosal Immunology (2) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): IMM 201; Or equivalent. Basic concepts and current research topics in the field of mucosal immunology, with an emphasis on human immunology. Major emphases include innate and adaptive mucosal immunity, the gastrointestinal tract, the lung, lymphocyte trafficking, and mucosal vaccination. (Letter.) Effective: 2006 Summer Session 1.