Horticulture & Agronomy (Graduate Group)

Astrid Volder, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1224 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building; 530-752-7738; http://ggha.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://ggha.ucdavis.edu/GGHAfaculty.htm

Astrid Volder, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1224 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building; 530-752-7738; http://ggha.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://ggha.ucdavis.edu/GGHAfaculty.htm

Graduate Study. The Graduate Group in Horticulture and Agronomy offers programs of study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees for students interested in the science and management of agricultural crops, including their ecology, physiology, genetics, and post-harvest management, as well as the interaction of agricultural crops with the environment. The M.S. program is designed to focus on a cropping system, such as agronomy, environmental horticulture, pomology, vegetable crops, viticulture and weed science. Within that cropping system, the student can specialize in one of a number of areas, including agroecology, biotechnology, breeding and crop improvement, crop physiology, crop production, floriculture, landscape horticulture, mineral nutrition, modeling, nursery production, pest management, plant growth and development, postharvest physiology, revegetation/restoration, and water relations. Research may be conducted within these areas with an applied or basic focus, but in association with a cropping system.

Preparation. For both the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, a level of competence equivalent to that of a sound undergraduate program in Plant Science is required. This includes coursework in general biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, statistics, genetics, plant physiology, and soil science. A few limited deficiencies in any of these areas can be made up after admission to the graduate program. Specific requirements are outlined in detail on the group's website. The graduate advisor, the major professor, and the student will design a program of advanced courses to meet individual academic needs within one of the specializations.

Graduate Advisors. Consult the Group office.


Astrid Volder, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group

Group Office. 1224 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building; 530-752-7738; http://ggha.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://ggha.ucdavis.edu/GGHAfaculty.htm

Graduate Study. The Graduate Group in Horticulture and Agronomy offers programs of study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees for students interested in the science and management of agricultural crops, including their ecology, physiology, genetics, and post-harvest management, as well as the interaction of agricultural crops with the environment. In the Ph.D. program, students focus on one of five areas of emphasis: agroecology, crop improvement/plant breeding, crop production systems, plant physiology, and post-harvest biology/physiology.  Research may be conducted within these areas with an applied or basic focus, but in association with a cropping system such as agronomy, environmental horticulture, pomology, vegetable crops, viticulture and weed science.

Preparation. For both the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, a level of competence equivalent to that of a sound undergraduate program in Plant Science is required. This includes coursework in general biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, statistics, genetics, plant physiology, and soil science. A few limited deficiencies in any of these areas can be made up after admission to the graduate program. Specific requirements are outlined in detail on the group's website. The graduate advisor, the major professor, and the student will design a program of advanced courses to meet individual academic needs within one of the specializations.

Graduate Advisors. Consult the Group office.

Courses in HRT:
HRT 200AHorticulture & Agronomy: Principles (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Core course to introduce students to the principles that are of general importance in horticultural and agronomic research, including agroecology, plant developmental physiology, crop improvement, and biotechnology. Generally taken in the first year of the graduate program. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Winter Quarter.
HRT 200BHorticulture & Agronomy: Practices (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s); Fieldwork—3 hour(s); Seminar—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): HRT 200A recommended; graduate standing. Introduction to horticultural and agronomic cropping systems. Covers current applied research within agroecology, crop improvement, crop production, postharvest biology. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
HRT 203Research Perspectives in Horticulture (3) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Following lectures/discussions of scientific methodology, students develop research proposals aided by classroom discussions and individual interactions with instructors. Lectures and critiques of classical papers provide a sense of the evolution of the current concepts in perennial plant biology. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
HRT 251Modeling Horticultural Systems (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PLS 142; or Consent of Instructor. Calculus. Development and application of models. Emphasis on physiological and ecological models, with examples from areas of interest to class participants. Applications to horticultural systems. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
HRT 290Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing at UCD. Seminars presented by invited speakers, students, or faculty on selected topics in horticulture. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
HRT 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
HRT 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Research. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Winter Quarter.