Materials Science & Engineering; Engineering

(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers one undergraduate program in Materials Science and Engineering and a minor in Materials Science.

Mission Statement. The mission of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is to promote excellence in innovative cross-disciplinary materials education and research within an inclusive culture of students, staff, and faculty committed to creating a climate that respect and embraces racial, gender, and ethnic diversity at every level.

Honors Program. An Honors Program is available to qualified students in Materials Science and Engineering. It is a two-year program designed to challenge the most talented students in the major. Students invited to participate will complete either an honors thesis or a project that might involve local industry. Students must maintain a grade point average of 3.500 to continue in the program. Successful completion of the Honors Program will be acknowledged on the student's transcript.

Materials Science and Engineering Undergraduate Program

The Materials Science and Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET; see http://www.abet.org.

Materials science and engineering is directed toward an understanding of the structure, properties, and processing of materials. Society demands new and improved materials with capabilities far superior to common metals, polymers, and ceramics. New materials are needed for high-speed transportation systems, surgical and dental implants, new generations of power plants, renewable energy sources, and solid-state electronic and photonics devices in computer and communication technology. Both the development of new materials and the understanding of present-day materials demand a thorough knowledge of basic engineering and scientific principles, including crystal structure, elastic and plastic behavior, thermodynamics, phase equilibria and reaction rates, and structural and physical and chemical behavior of engineering materials.

Materials engineers study phenomena found in many different engineering operations, from fracture behavior in automobiles to fatigue behavior in aircraft frames, from corrosion behavior in petro-chemical refineries to radiation-induced damage in nuclear power plants, and from the fabrication of steel to the design of semiconductors. Materials engineers are also increasingly involved in developing the new materials needed to attain higher efficiencies in existing and proposed energy conversion schemes and will play a central role in the development of new technologies based on composites and high-temperature superconductivity.

The undergraduate materials science and engineering program provides the background for activities in research, processing, and the design of materials. The curriculum is based on a common core of courses basic to engineering; courses taken during your first two years provide a strong foundation in fundamental engineering concepts.

Objectives. We educate students in the fundamentals of materials science and engineering, balanced with the application of these principles to practical problems; educate students as independent, critical thinkers who can also function effectively in a team; educate students with a sense of community, ethical responsibility, and professionalism; educate students for careers in industry, government, and academia; teach students the necessity for continuing education and self-learning; and foster proficiency in written and oral communications.

Students are encouraged to adhere carefully to all prerequisite requirements. The instructor is authorized to drop students from a course for which stated prerequisites have not been completed.

Exclusive of General Education units, the minimum number of units required for the Materials Science and Engineering major is 154.

Lower Division Required Courses
Units: 79
MAT 021A
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021B
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021C
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021D
Vector Analysis (Active)
4
MAT 022A
Linear Algebra (Active)
3
MAT 022B
Differential Equations (Active)
3
PHY 009A
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009B
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009C
Classical Physics (Active)
5
PHY 009D
Modern Physics (Active)
4
CHE 002A
General Chemistry (Active)
5
CHE 002B
General Chemistry (Active)
5
CHE 002C
General Chemistry (Active)
5
or
CHE 002AH
Honors General Chemistry (Active)
5
CHE 002BH
Honors General Chemistry (Active)
5
CHE 002CH
Honors General Chemistry (Active)
5
ENG 017
Circuits I (Active)
4
and
ENG 045
Properties of Materials (Active)
4
or
ENG 045Y
Properties of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 002
Materials Marvels: The Science of Superheroes (Active)
3
ECH 060
Engineering Problem Solving Using MATLAB (Active)
4
Choose one; a grade of C- or better is required:
4
ENL 003
Introduction to Literature (Active)
4
UWP 001
Introduction to Academic Literacies (Active)
4
COM 001
Major Works of the Ancient World (Active)
4
COM 002
Major Works of the Medieval and Early Modern World (Active)
4
COM 003
Major Works of the Modern World (Active)
4
COM 004
Major Works of the Contemporary World (Active)
4
NAS 005
Introduction to Native American Literature (Active)
4
CMN 001
Introduction to Public Speaking (Active)
4
or
CMN 003
Interpersonal Communication Competence (Active)
4
Upper Division Required Courses
Units: 75-83
ENG 190
Professional Responsibilities of Engineers (Active)
3
EMS 160
Thermodynamics of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 162
Structure and Characterization of Engineering Materials (Active)
4
EMS 162L
Structure and Characterization of Materials Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 164
Kinetics of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 172
Smart Materials (Active)
4
EMS 172L
Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 174
Mechanical Behavior of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 174L
Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 180
Materials in Engineering Design (Active)
4
EMS 181
Materials Processing (Active)
4
EMS 188A
Materials Design Project (Active)
4
EMS 188B
Materials Design Project (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
ENG 180
Engineering Analysis (Active)
4
MAT 135A
Probability (Active)
4
STA 120
Probability and Random Variables for Engineers (Discontinued)
4
STA 131A
Introduction to Probability Theory (Active)
4
ECI 114
Probabilistic Systems Analysis for Civil Engineers (Active)
4
ECH 140
Mathematical Methods in Biochemical and Chemical Engineering (Active)
4
EME 115
Introduction to Numerical Analysis and Methods (Active)
4
PHY 104A
Introductory Methods of Mathematical Physics (Active)
4
Choose one:
3-4
CHE 110A
Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (Active)
4
CHE 124A
Inorganic Chemistry: Fundamentals (Active)
3
CHE 128A
Organic Chemistry (Active)
3
PHY 108
Optics (Active)
3
and
PHY 108L
Optics Laboratory (Active)
1
PHY 110A
Electricity and Magnetism (Active)
4
PHY 122A
Advanced Laboratory in Condensed Matter Physics (Active)
4
PHY 151
Stellar Structure and Evolution (Active)
4
PHY 160
Environmental Physics and Society (Active)
3
Choose one:
3-4
ECH 158A
Process Economics and Green Design (Active)
4
EMS 170
Sustainable Energy Technologies: Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Photovoltaic Cells (Active)
4
ENG 106
Engineering Economics (Active)
3
ENG 160
Environmental Physics and Society (Active)
3
ENG 188
Science and Technology of Sustainable Power Generation (Active)
4
ECI 123
Urban Systems and Sustainability (Active)
4
ECI 125
Building Energy Performance (Active)
4
ECI 143
Green Engineering Design and Sustainability (Active)
4
Choose a minimum of 14 units from one of the following focus areas:
14
Biomedical Engineering:
 
BIS 002A
Introduction to Biology: Essentials of Life on Earth (Active)
5
BIM 020
Fundamentals of Bioengineering (Active)
4
BIM 106
Biotransport Phenomena (Active)
4
BIM 109
Biomaterials (Active)
4
Biosystems Engineering:
 
BIS 002A
Introduction to Biology: Essentials of Life on Earth (Active)
5
ENG 100
Electronic Circuits and Systems (Active)
3
EBS 075
Properties of Materials in Biological Systems (Active)
4
EBS 165
Bioinstrumentation and Control (Active)
4
Chemical Engineering:
 
ECH 051
Material Balances (Active)
4
ECH 140
Mathematical Methods in Biochemical and Chemical Engineering (Active)
4
ECH 141
Fluid Mechanics for Biochemical and Chemical Engineers (Active)
4
ECH 142
Heat Transfer for Biochemical and Chemical Engineers (Active)
4
Civil Engineering:
 
ENG 035
Statics (Active)
4
ENG 104
Mechanics of Materials (Active)
4
ECI 130
Structural Analysis (Active)
4
ECI 132
Structural Design: Metallic Elements (Active)
4
Electrical Engineering:
 
ENG 100
Electronic Circuits and Systems (Active)
3
EEC 140A
Principles of Device Physics I (Active)
4
EEC 140B
Principles of Device Physics II (Active)
4
EEC 146A
Integrated Circuits Fabrication (Active)
4
Mechanical Engineering:
 
ENG 035
Statics (Active)
4
ENG 102
Dynamics (Active)
4
ENG 103
Fluid Mechanics (Active)
4
ENG 104
Mechanics of Materials (Active)
4
Depending on area of focus, 6-9 units of upper division electives
6-9
Students may receive up to a maximum of four units of credit for engineering 199 courses, when these courses are approved by the departmental undergraduate studies committee. To receive credit, students must submit a summary of their research to the committee. A letter of support from the faculty mentor is also required to verify that you have conducted substantial research activity.
0
Upper Division Composition Requirement
0-4
Choose one; grade of C- or better is required:
 
UWP 102E
Writing in the Disciplines: Engineering (Active)
4
UWP 102F
Writing in the Disciplines: Food Science and Technology (Active)
4
UWP 104A
Writing in the Professions: Business Writing (Active)
4
UWP 104E
Writing in the Professions: Science (Active)
4
UWP 104T
Writing in the Professions: Technical Writing (Active)
4
Passing the Upper Division Composition Exam.
0
Total: 154-156

(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

Graduate Programs in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering is home to a top-20 ranked graduate programs in Materials Science & Engineering. We offer a unique interdisciplinary environment for graduate studies, with renowned faculty and state-of-the-art research facilities.

The Graduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering

M.Eng., M.S., and Ph.D.
Ph.D. designated emphases are available as specializations in biotechnology, biophysics, and nuclear science.

The Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program provides students with a strong background in advanced materials synthesis, processing, and characterization, both from an experimental and theoretical standpoint.

Doctoral students are typically offered competitive four-year financial offers of fellowships and research/teaching assistantships which include tuition, fees, and a stipend.

Financial offers are subject to satisfactory progress towards completion of degree requirements.

Research areas include biomaterials, catalysts, ceramics, electronic and electrochemical properties and devices, glasses, green engineering and design, interfaces, magnetic materials and devices, materials microstructure and/or processing, mathematical modeling, mechanical properties and synthesis, metals, microscopy, molecular modeling, nanomaterials, optical properties and devices, polymers, renewable energy, sintering, structural materials, thermochemistry, and thin films.

Research Facilities and Partnerships:

  • Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy
  • Center for Northern California Nanotechnology
  • Center for Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture and Technology

Complete Information is available on our website.


(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

Graduate Programs in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering is home to a top-20 ranked graduate programs in Materials Science & Engineering. We offer a unique interdisciplinary environment for graduate studies, with renowned faculty and state-of-the-art research facilities.

The Graduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering

M.Eng., M.S., and Ph.D.
Ph.D. designated emphases are available as specializations in biotechnology, biophysics, and nuclear science.

The Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program provides students with a strong background in advanced materials synthesis, processing, and characterization, both from an experimental and theoretical standpoint.

Doctoral students are typically offered competitive four-year financial offers of fellowships and research/teaching assistantships which include tuition, fees, and a stipend.

Financial offers are subject to satisfactory progress towards completion of degree requirements.

Research areas include biomaterials, catalysts, ceramics, electronic and electrochemical properties and devices, glasses, green engineering and design, interfaces, magnetic materials and devices, materials microstructure and/or processing, mathematical modeling, mechanical properties and synthesis, metals, microscopy, molecular modeling, nanomaterials, optical properties and devices, polymers, renewable energy, sintering, structural materials, thermochemistry, and thin films.

Research Facilities and Partnerships:

  • Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy
  • Center for Northern California Nanotechnology
  • Center for Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture and Technology

Complete Information is available on our website.

(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

Graduate Programs in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering is home to a top-20 ranked graduate programs in Materials Science and Engineering. We offer a unique interdisciplinary environment for graduate studies, with renowned faculty and state-of-the-art research facilities.

The Graduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering

M.Eng., M.S., and Ph.D.
Ph.D. designated emphases are available as specializations in biotechnology, biophysics, and nuclear science.

The Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program provides students with a strong background in advanced materials synthesis, processing, and characterization, both from an experimental and theoretical standpoint.

Doctoral students are typically offered competitive four-year financial offers of fellowships and research/teaching assistantships which include tuition, fees, and a stipend.

Financial offers are subject to satisfactory progress towards completion of degree requirements.

Research areas include biomaterials, catalysts, ceramics, electronic and electrochemical properties and devices, glasses, green engineering and design, interfaces, magnetic materials and devices, materials microstructure and/or processing, mathematical modeling, mechanical properties and synthesis, metals, microscopy, molecular modeling, nanomaterials, optical properties and devices, polymers, renewable energy, sintering, structural materials, thermochemistry, and thin films.

Research Facilities and Partnerships:

  • Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy
  • Center for Northern California Nanotechnology
  • Center for Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture and Technology

Complete Information is available on our website.

(College of Engineering)

Jeffery Gibeling, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 530-752-6496; Fax 530-752-1031

Department Office. 3001 Ghausi Hall; 530-752-0400; Fax 530-752-1031; http://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. https://mse.engineering.ucdavis.edu/people/faculty/

Materials Science Minor

There is a constant need for professionals with more knowledge and experience in understanding the behavior of materials from which products such as electronics, sensors, biological implants, transportation vehicles, medical devices and infrastructure are made. The goal of this minor is to prepare students for careers that require training in materials science, including the fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetics and their effects on phase composition and structure, as well as the complex relationships between composition, structure, processing and behavior/performance. Topics covered include material thermodynamics and kinetics, materials structural analysis, and structure-property relationships for electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical behavior. The minor is expected to accommodate persons of diverse backgrounds, such as those majoring in engineering, physical sciences, biological sciences, and mathematics.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade. A grade of C- or better is required for all courses used to satisfy minor requirements, with an overall GPA in minor requirement courses of 2.000 or better.

Minor Advisor. S. Gentry (Department of Materials Science and Engineering)

Materials Science
Units: 20
EMS 160
Thermodynamics of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 162
Structure and Characterization of Engineering Materials (Active)
4
EMS 164
Kinetics of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 172
Smart Materials (Active)
4
or
EMS 174
Mechanical Behavior of Materials (Active)
4
Choose an additional four units from the following, if not used above:
4
EMS 147
Principles of Polymer Materials Science (Active)
3
EMS 162L
Structure and Characterization of Materials Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 172
Smart Materials (Active)
4
EMS 172L
Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 174
Mechanical Behavior of Materials (Active)
4
EMS 174L
Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (Active)
2
EMS 180
Materials in Engineering Design (Active)
4
EMS 181
Materials Processing (Active)
4
EMS 182
Failure Analysis (Active)
4
Total: 20
Courses in EMS:
EMS 002Materials Marvels: The Science of Superheroes (3) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to science and technology of materials as key engineering ingredients. Explores the relationship between art and materials, and how superheroes are both products and resources of ideas for new materials' technologies. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
EMS 006HHonors Materials Science Computer Applications (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ENG 006 (can be concurrent); Enrollment in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program; ENG 006 required concurrently. Restricted to students in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Examination of materials science computer applications through additional readings, discussions, collaborative work, or special activities which may include projects or computer simulations. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 009HHonors Solid-State Materials Science (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): PHY 009D (can be concurrent); Enrollment in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program; PHY 009D required concurrently. Restricted to students in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Examination of solid-state materials science and modern physics topics through additional readings, discussions, collaborative work, or special activities which may include projects, laboratory experience or computer simulations. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 147Principles of Polymer Materials Science (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CHE 002A; CHE 002B; ((CHE 008A, CHE 008B) or (ENG 045 or ENG 045Y)); introductory physics. Basic principles of polymer science presented including polymer structure and synthesis; polymerization mechanisms, polymer classes, properties, and reactions; polymer morphology, rheology, and characterization; polymer processing. (Same course as FPS 100.) (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 160Thermodynamics of Materials Processes and Phase Stability (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ENG 045 C- or better; PHY 009B C- or better; MAT 022B C- or better; CHE 002C recommended. Review of thermodynamic principles of interest to materials scientists and engineers. Application of thermodynamics to material processing, phase stability, corrosion. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 160Thermodynamics of Materials Processes and Phase Stability (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); PHY 009B C- or better; MAT 022B C- or better; CHE 002C recommended. Review of thermodynamic principles of interest to materials scientists and engineers. Application of thermodynamics to material processing, phase stability, corrosion. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 160Thermodynamics of Materials (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); PHY 009B C- or better; MAT 022B C- or better; CHE 002C recommended. Review of thermodynamic principles of interest to materials scientists and engineers. Application of thermodynamics to material processing, phase stability, corrosion. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL. Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 162Structure and Characterization of Engineering Materials (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); MAT 022A C- or better; PHY 009B C- or better. Description of the structure of engineering materials on the atomic scale by exploring the fundamentals of crystallography. The importance of this structure to materials’ properties. Description of experimental determination using x-ray diffraction techniques. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
EMS 162LStructure and Characterization of Materials Laboratory (2) Active
Laboratory—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 162 (can be concurrent); Concurrent enrollment recommended. Experimental investigations of structure of solid materials are combined with techniques for characterization of materials. Laboratory exercises emphasize methods used to study structure of solids at the atomic and microstructural levels. Methods focus on optical, x-ray and electron techniques. Not open for credit to those who have completed EMS 132; can be taken for 2 units of credit by those who have completed EMS 134L; not open for credit to those who have completed both EMS 132L and EMS 134L. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 164Rate Processes in Materials Science (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); EMS 160. Basic kinetic laws and the principles governing phase transformations. Applications in diffusion, oxidation, nucleation, growth and spinodal transformations. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
EMS 164Kinetics of Materials (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); EMS 160. Basic kinetic laws and the principles governing phase transformations. Applications in diffusion, oxidation, nucleation, growth and spinodal transformations. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 170Sustainable Energy Technologies: Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Photovoltaic Cells (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ENG 045 or ENG 045Y. Open to students in Engineering or related fields. Basic principles of future energy devices such as lithium batteries, fuel cells, and photovoltaic cells. Examines the current status of these energy technologies and analyze challenges that still must be overcome. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
EMS 172Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CHE 110A or PHY 009D; ENG 006 or ECM 006 or equivalent recommended. Electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of materials as related to structure and processing of solid state materials. Physical principles for understanding the properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and amorphous solids and the applications of these materials in engineering. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 172Smart Materials (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CHE 110A or PHY 009D; ENG 006 or ECH 060 or equivalent recommended. Electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of materials as related to structure and processing of solid state materials. Physical principles for understanding the properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and amorphous solids and the applications of these materials in engineering. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, VL. Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 172LElectronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties Laboratory (2) Active
Laboratory—3 hour(s); Lecture/Lab—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 172 (can be concurrent); Concurrent enrollment recommended. Experimental investigation of electronic, optical and magnetic properties of engineering materials, emphasizing the fundamental relationship between microstructure and properties as well as the influence of rate processes on the evolution of the microstructure and properties. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 174Mechanical Behavior of Materials (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); EMS 162 recommended. Microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the mechanical behavior of engineering materials, with emphasis on recent development in materials characterization by nondestructive testing. Fundamental aspects of plasticity in engineering materials, strengthening mechanisms and mechanical failure modes of materials systems. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 174LMechanical Behavior Laboratory (2) Active
Laboratory—3 hour(s); Lecture/Lab—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 174 (can be concurrent); Concurrent enrollment recommended. Experimental investigation of mechanical behavior of engineering materials. Laboratory exercises emphasize the fundamental relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, and the evolution of the microstructure as a consequence of rate process. Not open for credit to those who have taken EMS 138L; not open for credit to those who have taken both EMS 134L and EMS 138L. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Winter Quarter.
EMS 180Materials in Engineering Design (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better. Restricted to students with upper division standing. Quantitative treatment of materials selection for engineering applications. Discussion of design and material selection strategy; process and process selection strategy; process economics; life-cycle thinking and eco-design. Use of materials selection software. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 181Materials Processing (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better); (ENG 105 or ECH 152B or EEC 140A or EMS 164). Principles of phase equilibria, thermodynamics and reaction kinetics applied to materials processing. Effects of processing variables on the structure-property relationship. Fundamentals of the manufacturing processes for electronic, optical, functional and structural materials. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, VL, WE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 182Failure Analysis (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ENG 045 C- or better or ENG 045Y C- or better; EMS 174 recommended. Analysis of the way materials fail. Effects of temperature, mechanical deformation and corrosion on the properties of materials. forensics and methodologies for investigating failures of materials including optical microscopy, x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Investigation of practical problems. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, VL, WE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 188AMaterials Design Project (4) Active
Laboratory—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 160; EMS 162; EMS 164; EMS 172; EMS 174. Major materials design experience involving analysis of real materials synthesis/processing/fabrication and technological applications including critical assessments of economic, manufacturing, and ethical constraints. Various principles of materials science are integrated into a culminating team design project. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 188AHHonors Materials Design (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Open only to students in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Examination of special topics covered in the materials design course through additional readings, discussions, collaborative work, or special activities which may include projects, laboratory experience or computer simulations. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 188BMaterials Design Project (4) Active
Laboratory—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 188A. Major materials design experience involving analysis of real materials synthesis/processing/fabrication and technological applications including critical assessments of economic, manufacturing, and ethical constraints. Various principles of materials science are integrated into a culminating team design project. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, SL, VL, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 188BHHonors Materials Design (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Open only to students in the Materials Science and Engineering Honors Program. Examination of special topics covered in the materials design course through additional readings, discussions, collaborative work, or special activities which may include projects, laboratory experience or computer simulations. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 190CResearch Group Conference (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Upper division standing. Individual and/or group conference on problems, progress and techniques in materials research. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Lecture—1-5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Group study of selected topics. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special study for advanced undergraduates. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 200Preparing for Graduate Student Success (1) Active
Seminar—1.5 hour(s). Restricted to graduate students in Materials Science and Engineering. Introduction to the soft-skills and campus resources needed to succeed in graduate school. Emphasis on the student-mentor relationship and the process of selecting a research mentor. (Same course as ECH 200.) (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 230Fundamentals of Electron Microscopy (3) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 162. Principles and techniques of scanning and transmission of electron microscopy used in the study of materials will be described. Emphasis upon practical applications. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 230LLaboratory for Electron Microscopy (2) Active
Laboratory—6 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 230 (can be concurrent); EMS 230 required concurrently. Practical application of techniques of electron scanning and transmission microscopy including x-ray microanalysis. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 232Advanced Topics in Transmission Electron Microscopy (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—1 hour(s); Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 230. Advanced course in the techniques of electron microscopy including analytical techniques, probe diffraction methods, and high resolution imaging. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 232Advanced Topics in Transmission Electron Microscopy (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—1 hour(s); Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 230. Advanced course in the techniques of electron microscopy including analytical techniques, probe diffraction methods, and high resolution imaging. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 232LLaboratory for Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy (2) Review all entries Historical
Discussion—1 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 230L. Laboratory in advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques relevant to specific graduate research projects in materials science. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 232LLaboratory for Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy (2) Review all entries Discontinued
Discussion—1 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 230L. Laboratory in advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques relevant to specific graduate research projects in materials science. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 241Principles and Applications of Dislocation Mechanics (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing in Engineering. Concepts in dislocation theory are applied to explain plasticity of crystalline solids. Glide and climb of dislocations, strain hardening, recrystallization, theories of creep processes and interaction of dislocation with solute atoms, precipitates and impurity clouds are discussed. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 241Principles and Applications of Dislocation Mechanics (4) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing in Engineering. Concepts in dislocation theory are applied to explain plasticity of crystalline solids. Glide and climb of dislocations, strain hardening, recrystallization, theories of creep processes and interaction of dislocation with solute atoms, precipitates and impurity clouds are discussed. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 243Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Engineering Materials (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing in Engineering; EMS 160 recommended. Theory of alloying, kinetics of phase changes, homogenous and heterogeneous transformation, transformation by shear, order-disorder reactions. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 243Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Engineering Materials (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing in Engineering; EMS 160 recommended. Theory of alloying, kinetics of phase changes, homogenous and heterogeneous transformation, transformation by shear, order-disorder reactions. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 244Interaction of Materials and their Environment (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ENG 045 or ENG 045Y); ENG 105A recommended; or consent of instructor. Thermodynamic and kinetic foundations of the corrosion and oxidation processes. Practical aspects of corrosion control and prevention. Stress-corrosion and gas-embrittlement phenomena. Special topics in corrosion; microbiological and atmospheric corrosion. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
EMS 245Micro- and Nano-Technology in Life Sciences (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Survey of biomedical device design from the engineering and biological perspectives; micro-/nano-fabrication and characterization techniques; surface chemistry and mass transfer; essential biological processes and models; proposal development skills to merge aforementioned themes in a multidisciplinary project. (Same course as EEC 245 and ECH 245.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 245Micro- and Nano-Technology in Life Sciences (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Survey of biodevice design from engineering and biological perspectives; micro-/nano-fabrication techniques; surface science and mass transport; essential biological processes and models; proposal development skills on merging aforementioned themes. (Same course as EEC 245, ECH 245, and MAE 245.) (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
EMS 246Photovoltaics and Solar Cells (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EEC 140B; or Consent of Instructor. Or equivalent. Physics and application of photovoltaics and solar cells, including design, fabrication technology, and grid incorporation. Mono and microcrystalline silicon devices; thin-film technologies, heterojunction and organic-semiconductor technologies. Collectors, electrical inverters and infrastructure issues. Challenges and concerns. (Same course as EEC 248.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 248Fracture of Engineering Materials (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 174. Description of the failure of materials by crack propagation. Topics include the stress fields about elastic cracks, the Griffith-Irwin analysis, descriptions of plastic zones, fracture toughness testing, microstructural aspects of fracture and failure at elevated temperatures. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 249Mechanisms of Fatigue (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 174; or Consent of Instructor. EMS 248 recommended. Microstructural description of the mechanisms of fatigue in metals. Topics include a phenomenological treatment of cyclic deformation, dislocation processes in cyclic deformation, fatigue crack nucleation, Stage I growth, threshold effects and high temperature cyclic deformation. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250ASpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250A.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250BSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250B.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250CSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250C.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250CSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250C.) (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 250DSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250D.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250DSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250D.) (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 250ESpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250E.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250FSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250F.) (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 250FSpecial Topics in Polymer and Fiber Science (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 147; or Consent of Instructor. Selected topics of current interest in polymer and fiber sciences. Topics will vary each time the course is offered. (Same course as FPS 250F.) (Letter.) Effective: 2019 Fall Quarter.
EMS 251Applications of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (3) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in chemistry, physics or engineering, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of solid state NMR spectroscopy and principles of advanced NMR techniques for analyzing structure of solid materials. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 251Applications of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (3) Review all entries Discontinued
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in chemistry, physics or engineering, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of solid state NMR spectroscopy and principles of advanced NMR techniques for analyzing structure of solid materials. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
EMS 260Advanced Thermodynamics of Solids (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 160. Thermodynamic principles, formalism and their application to solid materials. Specific examples from ceramic and solid state systems. Use of thermodynamic approach in developing understanding of and constraints for processes in real systems. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 262Advanced Topics in Structure of Materials (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 162; EMS 174 recommended; graduate standing in Engineering or consent of instructor. Nature of microstructure in engineering materials. Crystalline and non-crystalline structures, with special emphasis on grain boundary segregation in the development of polycrystalline microstructure and the radial distribution function of amorphous materials. Not open for credit to students who previously completed (cancelled) EMS 245. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 264Transport Phenomena in Materials Processes (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Engineering. Thermodynamic driving forces and atomic-scale mechanisms underlying diffusive mass transport and interface motion in materials. Nucleation, growth and coarsening dynamics of phase transformations. Not open for credit to students who previously completed EMS 240. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 272Advanced Functional Properties of Materials (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Physics, Chemistry, and Engineering. Fundamental physical properties of solid materials important to solid state devices, specifically electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. Topics include band structures, metals, superconductors, semiconductors, dielectrics, optical properties, and magnetic properties and implementation of these properties into devices. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 274Advanced Mechanical Properties of Materials (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): EMS 174. Comprehensive study of mechanical properties of materials, with special attention to dislocations and deformation and fracture control mechanisms. Mechanical properties of conventional engineering materials as well as advanced materials such as nanocrystalline solids and thin films are considered. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 282Glass: Science and Technology (3) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Extensive Writing—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Chemistry, Physics or Engineering, or consent of instructor. Modern paradigms in glass science and their applications to technologies. Relation of macroscopic properties of glasses and glass-forming liquids to atomic-level structures, including principles of formation, relaxation, transport phenomena, nucleation, crystallization and phase separation in glasses. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 288Living Matter: Physical Biology of the Cell (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Open to any student possessing general background in any disciplines of physical or biological sciences and engineering. Introduction to the origin, maintenance, and regulation of the dynamic architecture of the cell, including cellular modes of organization, dynamics and energy dissipation, molecular transport, motility, regulation, and adaptability. (Same course as BIM 288 and BPH 288.) (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
EMS 289ASpecial Topics in Materials Science; Electronic Materials (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Electronic Materials. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289BSpecial Topics in Materials Science; Ceramics and Minerals (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Ceramics and Minerals. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289CSpecial Topics in Materials Science; Physics and Chemistry of Materials (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Physics and Chemistry of Materials. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289DSpecial Topics in Materials Science; Materials Processing (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Materials Processing. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289ESpecial Topics in Materials Science; Materials Science and Forensics (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Materials Science and Forensics. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289FSpecial Topics in Materials Science; Biomaterials (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Biomaterials. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 289GSpecial Topics in Materials Science; Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxides (1-5) Active
Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Special topics in Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxides. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 290Materials Science and Engineering Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Selected topics of current interest in Materials Science and Engineering. The subjects covered will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each quarter. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
EMS 290CGraduate Research Conference (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Individual and/or group conference on problems, progress, and techniques in materials science and engineering research. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 294Materials Science Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Current literature and developments in materials science with presentations by individual students. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Group study. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Research. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
EMS 390The Teaching of Materials Science (1) Active
Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Meet qualifications for teaching assistant and/or associate-in in materials science and engineering. Participation as a teaching assistant or associate-in in a designated engineering course. Methods of leading discussion groups or laboratory sections, writing and grading quizzes, use of laboratory equipment, and grading laboratory reports. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.