Community & Regional Development

(College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

(Department of Human Ecology)

Luis E. Guarnizo, Ph.D., Community and Regional Development Program, Vice-Chairperson of the Department

Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Human Development and Family Studies Program, Vice-Chairperson of the Department

Department Advising Office. 1303 Hart Hall; 530-752-2244, 530-752-1805; 530-752-9322; http://hcd.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://humanecology.ucdavis.edu/crd-faculty

The Major Program

The Community and Regional Development major aims to provide a broad comparative understanding of theories, methodologies, and issues relevant to the study of communities and the people in them. The program focuses on the ways that economic, political and socio-cultural forces are transforming the world, countries, regions, and local communities, and it considers how knowledge can be used to improve the quality of community life.

The Program. Principal subjects of study within the major are community, regional, and organizational development; social change processes; the role of culture, gender, class, race and ethnicity in shaping social life; community and regional research methodologies; the impacts of innovation and technology on communities, and the effects of social, economic and political systems on regions. The major is organized to allow students to develop fields of concentration that meet their career goals.

Major Advisor. M. Kenney, mfkenney@ucdavis.edu

Internships and Career Alternatives. Community and Regional Development students are required to complete an internship in their field before graduation. Internships have been arranged with local, county, and state planning units, health departments, schools, housing offices, businesses, and education programs, among others. Community and Regional Development graduates are prepared for occupations in community development, social research, program evaluation, organizational and educational consulting, city and regional planning, and for-profit organizations. The major also provides effective preparation for graduate or professional study in the social and behavioral sciences or for professional degrees.

Honors Program. An Honors Program is available to Human and Community Development majors who have demonstrated excellence in their field of study. Entrance into the honors program requires that a student have completed at least 135 units with a minimum grade point average of 3.500 in upper division courses counted toward the major. The program consists of a project whose specific nature is determined in consultation with the student's Honors Adviser. It may involve completion of a research project, a scholarly paper, a senior thesis, or some comparable assignment. The project will have a minimum duration of two quarters and will be noted on the student's record by a variable unit course number or special honors course designation. Successful completion of the honors program requires that a minimum of eight (8) units of credit be earned in course work for the project. It is expected that a student participating in the Honors Program of the Community and Regional Development major will participate in the Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference. Additionally, students participating in the Honors Program will be required to give a public presentation of their work in a departmental seminar program.

Honors Program Advisor. M. Kenney, mfkenney@ucdavis.edu

Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 24-26
CRD 001
The Community (Active)
4
CRD 002
Ethnicity and American Communities (Active)
4
PLS 021
Application of Computers in Technology (Active)
3
or
ECS 015
Introduction to Computers (Active)
4
ECN 001A
Principles of Microeconomics (Active)
4
or
ECN 001B
Principles of Macroeconomics (Active)
4
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
or
SOC 001
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
5
Choose one:
4-5
STA 013
Elementary Statistics (Active)
4
STA 032
Gateway to Statistical Data Science (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 40-43
Core Issues in Community Development:
12-13
Choose three:
 
CRD 142
Rural Change in the Industrialized World (Active)
4
CRD 152
Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 153A
International Community Development: Asia (Active)
4
or
CRD 153B
International Community Development: Europe (Active)
4
or
CRD 153C
International Community Development: Africa (Active)
4
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
CRD 172
Social Inequality: Issues and Innovations (Active)
4
CRD 176
Comparative Ethnicity (Active)
4
CRD 180
Transnational Community Development (Active)
4
Economics of Community Change:
8
Choose two:
 
CRD 118
Technology and Society (Active)
4
CRD 140
Dynamics of Regional Development (Active)
4
CRD 141
Organization of Economic Space (Active)
4
CRD 162
People, Work and Technology (Active)
5
IAD 103
Social Change and Agricultural Development (Active)
4
Political Processes and Community Change:
8
Choose two:
 
CRD 147
Community Youth Development (Active)
4
CRD 149
Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (Active)
4
CRD 154
Social Theory and Community Change (Active)
4
CRD 157
Politics and Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 158
Small Community Governance (Active)
4
CRD 171
Housing and Social Policy (Active)
4
Methods for Community Research:
8-10
Choose two; at least one must be CRD 151 or 156:
 
CRD 151
Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (Active)
5
CRD 156
Community Economic Development (Active)
5
CMN 102
Empirical Methods in Communication (Active)
4
EDU 114
Quantitative Methods in Educational Research (Active)
4
LDA 150
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (Active)
4
SOC 103
Evaluation Research Methods (Active)
4
SOC 106
Intermediate Social Statistics (Active)
5
Note on substitutions. Supplementary list of pre-approved substitutions available in Advising Office.
 
Internship:
4
CRD 192
Internship (Active)
1-12
Areas of Specialization
Units: 40
Choose 20 units from each of two options, including at least one Community and Regional Development course from each option, or 40 units from one option, including at least two Community and Regional Development courses. These courses cannot overlap with the depth subject. Up to four units of variable-unit course work may be counted toward this requirement; e.g., Community and Regional Development 192.
 
Global Communities Option
40
Students must consult with a faculty advisor to identify an emphasis within the option and to select suitable courses.
 
Development Policy:
 
ANT 122B
Anthropology and Political Economy (Active)
4
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ARE 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ARE 115B
Economic Development (Active)
4
ARE 142
Personal Finance (Active)
3
CRD 140
Dynamics of Regional Development (Active)
4
CRD 152
Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 153A
International Community Development: Asia (Active)
4
CRD 153B
International Community Development: Europe (Active)
4
CRD 153C
International Community Development: Africa (Active)
4
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
CRD 180
Transnational Community Development (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ECN 115B
Economic Development (Active)
4
ECN 160A
International Microeconomics (Active)
4
ECN 160B
International Macroeconomics (Active)
4
ECN 162
International Economic Relations (Active)
4
IAD 170
Program Development for International Agriculture (Active)
4
SOC 138
Economic Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 159
Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (Active)
4
Gender and Development:
 
SOC 132
The Sociology of Gender (Active)
4
SOC 145A
Sociology of Third World Development (Active)
4
SOC 145B
Gender and Rural Development in the Third World (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
WMS 102
Gender and Post Colonialism (Active)
4
WMS 182
Globalization, Gender and Culture (Active)
4
Globalization and Politics:
 
POL 124
The Politics of Global Inequality (Active)
4
POL 130
Recent U.S. Foreign Policy (Active)
4
POL 131
Analysis of U.S. Foreign Policy (Active)
4
POL 175
Science, Technology, and Policy (Active)
4
Experiential Learning, Area Studies, and Language:
 
Total number of units of credit in Experiential learning, Area Studies, and Language courses cannot exceed 32.
 
Up to 12 credits transferred from any accredited foreign program or foreign internship, including UCD EAP and Summer Abroad programs.
 
Up to 12 credits in regional area studies classes; e.g., Middle East, China, Latin America.
 
Up to 12 credits for foreign language.
 
Organization and Management Option
40
Students must consult with a faculty advisor to identify an emphasis within the option and to select suitable courses.
 
Administration:
 
CRD 157
Politics and Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 158
Small Community Governance (Active)
4
CRD 194HA
Special Study for Honors Students (Active)
4
CRD 194HB
Special Study for Honors Student (Active)
4
ARE 100A
Intermediate Microeconomics: Theory of Production and Consumption (Active)
4
ARE 171A
Financial Management of the Firm (Discontinued)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
POL 100
Local Government and Politics (Active)
4
POL 105
The Legislative Process (Active)
4
POL 142A
Comparative Development: Political Development in Modernizing Societies (Active)
4
POL 142B
Comparative Development: Politics and Inequality (Active)
4
POL 142C
Comparative Political Development: Democracy and Democratization (Active)
4
POL 155
Judicial Process and Behavior (Active)
4
POL 183
Administrative Behavior (Active)
4
Communication:
 
CMN 136
Organizational Communication (Active)
4
CMN 140
Introduction to Mass Communication (Active)
4
CRD 147
Community Youth Development (Active)
4
CRD 176
Comparative Ethnicity (Active)
4
EDU 120
Philosophical and Social Foundations of Education (Active)
4
Human Resources:
 
CRD 151
Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (Active)
5
CRD 172
Social Inequality: Issues and Innovations (Active)
4
CRD 176
Comparative Ethnicity (Active)
4
CMN 102
Empirical Methods in Communication (Active)
4
ECN 151B
Economics of Human Resources (Active)
4
SOC 120
Deviance (Active)
4
SOC 128
Interracial Interpersonal Dynamics (Active)
4
SOC 129
Sociology of Black Experience in America (Active)
4
Management:
 
CRD 118
Technology and Society (Active)
4
CRD 140
Dynamics of Regional Development (Active)
4
CRD 141
Organization of Economic Space (Active)
4
CRD 154
Social Theory and Community Change (Active)
4
CRD 162
People, Work and Technology (Active)
5
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
ARE 112
Fundamentals of Organization Management (Active)
4
ARE 113
Fundamentals of Marketing Management (Active)
4
HIS 174A
The Gilded Age and Progressive Era: United States, 1876-1917 (Active)
4
HIS 174AD
Emergence of Modern America: Discussion (Active)
1
SOC 138
Economic Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 139
Corporations and Society (Active)
4
SOC 158
Women's Social Movements in Latin America (Active)
4
SOC 159
Work, Employment, and Careers in the 21st Century (Active)
4
SOC 180A
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
SOC 180B
Complex Organizations (Active)
4
Policy, Planning, and Social Services Option
40
Students must consult with a faculty advisor to identify an emphasis within the option and to select suitable courses.
 
General:
 
CRD 118
Technology and Society (Active)
4
CRD 142
Rural Change in the Industrialized World (Active)
4
CRD 151
Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (Active)
5
CRD 153A
International Community Development: Asia (Active)
4
CRD 153B
International Community Development: Europe (Active)
4
CRD 153C
International Community Development: Africa (Active)
4
CRD 154
Social Theory and Community Change (Active)
4
CRD 156
Community Economic Development (Active)
5
CRD 162
People, Work and Technology (Active)
5
CRD 176
Comparative Ethnicity (Active)
4
CRD 180
Transnational Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 194HA
Special Study for Honors Students (Active)
4
CRD 194HB
Special Study for Honors Student (Active)
4
POL 100
Local Government and Politics (Active)
4
POL 105
The Legislative Process (Active)
4
POL 108
Policy Making in the Public Sector (Active)
4
POL 109
Public Policy and the Governmental Process (Active)
4
POL 142A
Comparative Development: Political Development in Modernizing Societies (Active)
4
POL 142B
Comparative Development: Politics and Inequality (Active)
4
POL 142C
Comparative Political Development: Democracy and Democratization (Active)
4
POL 154
Legal Philosophy (Active)
4
POL 155
Judicial Process and Behavior (Active)
4
POL 183
Administrative Behavior (Active)
4
SOC 120
Deviance (Active)
4
SOC 140
Social Stratification (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
SOC 155
Sociology of Law (Active)
4
SOC 185
Social Policy (Active)
4
Community Health and Counseling:
 
CMN 120
Interpersonal Communication (Active)
4
CMN 122
Nonverbal Communication (Active)
4
CMN 165
Media and Health (Active)
4
CRD 164
Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (Active)
5
EDU 160A
Introduction to Peer Counseling (Active)
2
EDU 160B
Issues in Peer Counseling (Active)
2
SPH 101
Introduction to Public Health (Active)
3
HDE 120
Research Methods in Human Development (Active)
4
HDE 130
Developmental Psychopathology (Active)
4
PSC 123
Hormones and Behavior (Active)
3
PSC 126
Health Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 151
Social Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 154
Psychology of Emotion (Active)
4
PSC 162
Introduction to Personality Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 168
Abnormal Psychology (Active)
4
SOC 154
Health and Illness (Active)
4
Education and Community:
 
AED 100
Concepts in Agricultural and Environmental Education (Active)
3
AED 160
Vocational Education (Active)
3
CMN 101
Communication Theories (Active)
4
CMN 146
Communication Campaigns (Active)
4
EDU 100
Introduction to Schools (Active)
4
EDU 110
Educational Psychology: General (Active)
4
EDU 120
Philosophical and Social Foundations of Education (Active)
4
EDU 150
Cultural Diversity and Education in a Sociopolitical Context (Active)
4
EDU 151
Language Development in the Chicano Child (Active)
3
EDU 152
Academic Spanish for Bilingual Teachers (Active)
3
EDU 153
Diversity in the K-12 Classroom (Active)
2
PSC 100
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 132
Language and Cognition (Active)
4
SOC 124
Education and Inequality in the U.S. (Active)
4
Environmental Policy and Regional Planning:
 
CRD 140
Dynamics of Regional Development (Active)
4
CRD 141
Organization of Economic Space (Active)
4
CRD 149
Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (Active)
4
CRD 152
Community Development (Active)
4
CRD 158
Small Community Governance (Active)
4
CRD 171
Housing and Social Policy (Active)
4
ECN 115A
Economic Development (Active)
4
ESM 121
Water Science and Management (Active)
3
ESP 110
Principles of Environmental Science (Active)
4
ESP 160
The Policy Process (Active)
4
ESP 161
Environmental Law (Active)
4
ESP 164
Ethical Issues in Environmental Policy (Active)
3
ESP 168A
Methods of Environmental Policy Evaluation (Active)
5
ESP 168B
Methods of Environmental Policy Analysis (Active)
4
ESP 171
Urban and Regional Planning (Active)
4
ESP 172
Public Lands Management (Historical)
4
ESP 173
Land Use and Growth Controls (Active)
4
ESP 179
Environmental Impact Assessment (Active)
4
POL 102
Urban Public Policy (Active)
4
POL 107
Environmental Politics and Administration (Active)
4
POL 175
Science, Technology, and Policy (Active)
4
SOC 102
Society and Culture of California (Active)
4
SOC 118
Political Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 138
Economic Sociology (Active)
4
SOC 141
Industrialization and Social Change (Active)
4
SOC 143A
Urban Society (Active)
4
SOC 143B
Sociology of City Life (Active)
4
SOC 170
Population (Active)
4
Family and Community:
 
AMS 152
The Lives of Children in America (Active)
4
CRD 147
Community Youth Development (Active)
4
HDE 100A
Infancy and Early Childhood (Active)
4
HDE 100B
Middle Childhood and Adolescence (Active)
4
HDE 100C
Adulthood and Aging (Active)
4
HDE 101
Cognitive Development (Active)
4
HDE 102
Social and Personality Development (Active)
4
HDE 103
Cross-Cultural Study of Children (Active)
4
HDE 110
Contemporary American Family (Active)
4
HDE 130
Developmental Psychopathology (Active)
4
HDE 140
Communication and Interaction with Young Children (Active)
2
HDE 140L
Laboratory in Early Childhood (Active)
3-5
HDE 141
Field Study With Children and Adolescents (Active)
4-6
HDE 143
Field Studies of the Elderly (Active)
4-6
HDE 160
Social Aspects of Aging (Active)
4
HDE 161
Applied Cognition and Aging (Active)
4
HDE 163
Cognitive Neuropsychology in Adulthood and Aging (Active)
4
PSC 140
Developmental Psychology (Active)
4
SOC 122
Sociology of Adolescence (Active)
4
SOC 131
The Family (Active)
4
SOC 134
Sociology of Racial Ethnic Families (Active)
4
SOC 135
Social Relationships (Active)
4
SOC 152
Juvenile Delinquency (Active)
4
Choose three in English Composition:
 
ENL 003
Introduction to Literature (Active)
4
UWP 001
Introduction to Academic Literacies (Active)
4
UWP 018
Style in the Essay (Discontinued)
4
UWP 019
Writing Research Papers (Discontinued)
4
UWP 101
Advanced Composition (Active)
4
UWP 102A
Writing in the Disciplines: Special Topics (Active)
4
UWP 102B
Writing in the Disciplines: Biology (Active)
4
UWP 102C
Writing in the Disciplines: History (Active)
4
UWP 102D
Writing in the Disciplines: International Relations (Active)
4
UWP 102E
Writing in the Disciplines: Engineering (Active)
4
UWP 102F
Writing in the Disciplines: Food Science and Technology (Active)
4
UWP 102G
Writing in the Disciplines: Environmental Writing (Active)
4
UWP 102H
Writing in the Disciplines: Human Development and Psychology (Active)
4
UWP 102J
Writing in the Disciplines: Fine Arts (Active)
4
UWP 102K
Writing in the Disciplines: Sociology (Active)
4
UWP 102L
Writing in the Disciplines: Film Studies (Active)
4
UWP 104A
Writing in the Professions: Business Writing (Active)
4
UWP 104B
Writing in the Professions: Law (Active)
4
UWP 104C
Writing in the Professions: Journalism (Active)
4
UWP 104D
Writing in the Professions: Elementary and Secondary Education (Active)
4
UWP 104E
Writing in the Professions: Science (Active)
4
UWP 104F
Writing in the Professions: Health (Active)
4
UWP 104I
Writing in the Professions: Internships (Active)
4
CMN 001
Introduction to Public Speaking (Active)
4
COM 001
Major Works of the Ancient World (Active)
4
COM 002
Major Works of the Medieval and Early Modern World (Active)
4
COM 003
Major Works of the Modern World (Active)
4
COM 004
Major Works of the Contemporary World (Active)
4
or
NAS 005
Introduction to Native American Literature (Active)
4
Choose at least one:
4
UWP 101
Advanced Composition (Active)
4
UWP102 Series
 
UWP104 Series
 
The Upper Division Composition Exam does not satisfy the requirement.
 
Advanced Placement English score of 4 or 5 which satisfies English 3 and/or University Writing Program 1 will satisfy one of the three required courses.
 
Total: 108-113
Courses in CRD:
CRD 001The Community (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Basic concepts of community analysis and planned social change. The dynamics of community change through case studies of communities including peasant, urban ghetto, suburban mainline, and California farm workers. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 002Ethnicity and American Communities (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Historical and cultural survey of the role of various ethnic groups in the development of American communities. Examines ethnicity as a cultural factor, ethnicity as power and issues related to selected American ethnic groups. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 020Food Systems (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Social aspects of agri-food systems. Social science perspectives applied to food and agricultural sustainability in relation to ecology, knowledge, technology, power, governance, labor, social difference, and social movements. Social and environmental effects of commodity chains in comparative global context. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 092Internship (1-12) Active
Internship—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Supervised internship, off and on campus, in community and institutional settings. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 098Directed Group Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable—3-15 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 099Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 118Technology and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002. Impact of technology on labor relations, employment, industrial development and international relations. Internal relations of technology development and deployment. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 140Dynamics of Regional Development (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002. Industrial cluster formation and institutions. Technology, labor relations and interfirm linkages in global value chains. California and other regions are used as case studies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 141Organization of Economic Space (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002. Globalization and technological restructuring of economic activity focusing on new spatial patterns of production and circulation and their implications for workers, communities and societies, both in the U.S. and around the globe. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 142Rural Change in the Industrialized World (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or CRD 001 or CRD 002 or ANT 002. Geography of rural environment with emphasis on rural restructuring. Demographics, community, economy, governance, agriculture, and environmental conservation in rural areas of industrialized world. Case studies from and comparisons drawn between North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 147Community Youth Development (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Project (Term Project); Extensive Writing/Discussion; Term Paper. Community influences on youth well-being, youth as agents of community change, and policies to support healthy communities for young people. Special emphasis on disparities in youth well-being related to race, class, immigration status, gender, sexual-orientation. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 149Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing/Discussion; Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Environmental justice social movements; inequitable distribution of pollution on low-income communities of color; histories, policies, and innovations associated environmental justice movements in the United States and around the world. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 150Quantitative Methods in Community Research (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): SOC 046B or STA 013 or STA 032; Consent of Instructor. Introduction to statistical analysis of social data relevant to community research, planning and assessment, emphasizing data sources and acquisition, descriptive and inferential analysis techniques, and data interpretation and presentation. Emphasis on spatial data and methods, focusing on the sources, processing, analysis, and presentation of spatial data in a community assessment context. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SL, SS. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
CRD 151Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001; STA 013 or STA 013Y or SOC 046B; Any upper division Community and Regional Development course is recommended. Emphasis on the design and analysis of community research considering the relationship between theory and practice. Study of community research methods, including structural analysis, elite interviewing, and ethnographic approaches. Course requires design and completion of field research project. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
CRD 151Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (5) Review all entries Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Laboratory—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001; (STA 013 or STA 013Y or SOC 046B); Any upper division Community and Regional Development course is recommended. Design and analysis of community research considering the relationship between theory and practice. Community research methods, including elite interviewing, ethnographic approaches, and statistical methods, descriptive statistics and OLS regression. Course requires design and completion of field research project. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
CRD 152Community Development (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 151 or SOC 002 or ANT 002 or ASA 100 or CHI 132 or AAS 101. Introduction to principles and strategies of community organizing and development. Examination of non-profit organizations, citizen participation, poverty reduction, community needs assessment, and regional development strategies. Comparison of community development approaches of the U.S.A./California with other western and non-western societies. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 153AInternational Community Development: Asia (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or ANT 002 or IAD 010 or SOC 001 or SOC 002 or POL 001. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Japan and the impact of global forces in different settings. Alternative strategies with emphasis on self-reliance and locally controlled development. Course is based in Kyoto, Japan, and includes field trips. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 153AInternational Community Development: Asia (4) Review all entries Active
Project (Term Project)—3 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. 2.000 GPA; good academic standing. For summer and quarter abroad versions, limited to 30 students; for the Seminar Abroad version, limited to 15 students; this allows for the small group learning methodology as well as the active collaboration with in-country university students; available for undergraduate and graduate students; applications through UC Davis Study Aboard accepted on a first-come, first-reserved basis for qualified applicants. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in a range of Asian countries and the impact of global forces in different settings. Includes classroom lectures, workshops, field trips, and collaborative action research projects. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
CRD 153BInternational Community Development: Europe (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 or IAD 010 or CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or SOC 002 or POL 001. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Europe and the impact of global forces in different settings. Alternative strategies with emphasis on self-reliance and locally controlled development. Based in Freiburg, Germany, including field trips to France and Switzerland. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 153CInternational Community Development: Africa (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Fieldwork—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or ANT 002 or IAD 010 or SOC 001 or SOC 002 or POL 001. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Africa and the impact of global forces in urban and rural settings. Focus on strategies that promote self-reliance and locally controlled development. Course based in South Africa, includes field trips. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 154Social Theory and Community Change (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or SOC 001 or ANT 002. Comparative overview of the dominant social science paradigms for the study of community development and change. Among the paradigms discussed are functionalism, conflict theory/Marxism, structuralism, methodological individualism, reflexive modernity. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 156Community Economic Development (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Laboratory—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 152 or PLS 021 or ECS 015; and Consent of Instructor. How government and community organizations help firms grow and create jobs through local economic development corporations, small business centers, revolving loan funds, incubators, and other programs. Techniques to analyze community economic potential and identification of appropriate intervention tools. Group project. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 157Politics and Community Development (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Analyzes political, economic and sociocultural forces shaping the form and function of local communities in the U.S. Considers theories of the state, the community and social change and case studies of actual community development in comparative historical perspective. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 158Small Community Governance (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Fieldwork—30 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or SOC 001 or POL 001. Governing institutions and political processes in rural and small urban places. Local government organization, community autonomy, leadership, political change, policy development, and select policy issues including public finance. Field research on political processes or policy issues in select communities. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 162People, Work and Technology (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or SOC 001 or ANT 001; Upper division standing recommended. Restricted to upper division standing. Analysis of the relationship between work, technology, and human experience. Theories of the causes and consequences of labor process change; impacts of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and citizenship status on work; responses of workers, communities, and policy-makers to workplace changes. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 162People, Work and Technology (5) Review all entries Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or SOC 001 or ANT 001; Upper division standing recommended. Analysis of the relationship between work, technology, and the human experience. Theories of the causes and consequences of labor process, changes under capitalism and globalization, impacts of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and citizenship status on work in the United States and globally; responses of workers, communities, and policy-makers to workplace changes. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
CRD 164Theories of Organizations and their Role in Community Change (5) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Laboratory—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (STA 013 or STA 013Y or SOC 046B); (CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002). Planned change within and through community organizations. Private voluntary organizations, local community associations, and local government. Relationship between community organizations and social capital. Collaborative original data gathering and professional report writing. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
CRD 171Housing and Social Policy (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Term Paper. Social impact, economics, and politics of housing in the United States. Special attention given to federal, state, and local policy and program strategies to produce and preserve affordable housing and inclusive neighborhoods. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 172Social Inequality: Issues and Innovations (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Term Paper; Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002; Upper division standing recommended. Focus on the dimensions, causes, and means of alleviating social inequality in the U.S. Examination and analysis of major theories and forms (class, race/ethnicity, gender, and citizenship status) of inequality. Policy-based and grassroots approaches to change. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 176Comparative Ethnicity (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or CRD 002 or SOC 001 or ANT 002; Upper division standing recommended. Role of ethnicity in shaping social systems and interaction. Analytical approaches to and issues arising from the study of ethnicity, through utilization of data from a range of different societies. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 180Transnational Community Development (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): CRD 001 or ANT 002 or SOC 001. The effects of grassroots, non-state, non-corporate actors from abroad on local, national and international development. Socioeconomic, political, and cultural implications of transnational actions undertaken by international non-governmental organizations, individual migrants, and migrant grassroots civic organizations. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 192Internship (1-12) Active
Internship—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Completion of 84 units. Supervised internship, off and on campus, in community and institutional settings. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 194HASpecial Study for Honors Students (4) Active
Independent Study—3 hour(s); Seminar—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Completion of 135 units at the time of enrollment; GPA 3.500 in the major; GPA 3.300 in overall standing; completion of at least four upper division courses; agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis advisor. Community and Regional Development Honors is a program of direct reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 194HBSpecial Study for Honors Student (4) Active
Independent Study—3 hour(s); Seminar—1 hour(s); Project (Term Project); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Completion of 135 units at the time of enrollment; GPA 3.500 in the major; GPA 3.300 in overall standing; completion of at least four upper division courses; agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis advisor. Community and Regional Development Honors is a program of direct reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 197TTutoring in Community and Regional Development (1-5) Active
Tutorial—3-15 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Upper division standing; completion of course to be tutored. Assisting instructor in one of the Community and Regional Development's regular courses by tutoring individual students or small groups of students in a laboratory, in voluntary discussion groups, or other voluntary activities. May be repeated up to 10 Unit(s). (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2013 Fall Quarter.
CRD 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 200Planning for Health (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s); Extensive Writing; Project (Term Project)—1 hour(s). Focused on the intersection of city planning and public health. The health of an individual or community is determined not only by the health care they receive, but also by the natural, social, physical, economic, and political environment. Covers topics such as food access, air quality, water quality, waste and energy infrastructure, community engagement, and the planning process. Provides an overview of available public spatially explicit data. (Letter.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
CRD 240Community Development Theory (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Introduction to theories of community development and different concepts of community, poverty, and development. Emphasis on building theory, linking applied development techniques to theory, evaluating development policy, and examining case studies of community development organizations and projects. (Same course as GEO 240.) (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
CRD 241The Economics of Community Development (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Economic theories and methods of planning for communities. Human resources, community services and infrastructure, industrialization and technological change, and regional growth. The community's role in the greater economy. (Same course as GEO 241.) (Letter.) Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
CRD 242Community Development Organizations (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 240; and Consent of Instructor. Class size limited to 15 students. Theory and praxis of organizations with social change agendas at the community level. Emphasis on non-profit organizations and philanthropic foundations. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 242SCommunity Development Organizations (International) (4) Active
Fieldwork—10 hour(s); Lecture—5 hour(s); Workshop—5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 240. Class size limited to 10 students. Theory and praxis of organizations with social change agendas at the community level. Emphasis on local governance, non-profit organizations and philanthropic foundations at an international level. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 243Critical Environmental Justice Studies (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open to graduate students only. Application of social science theories of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and power to understand the production and contestation of environmental inequities. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
CRD 244Political Ecology of Community Development (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Community development from the perspective of geographical political ecology. Social and environmental outcomes of the dynamic relationship between communities and land-based resources, and between social groups. Cases of community conservation and development in developing and industrialized countries. (Same course as GEO 254. ) (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
CRD 245The Political Economy of Urban and Regional Development (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): CRD 157; CRD 244; Or equivalent. How global, political and economic restructuring and national and state policies are mediated by community politics; social production of urban form; role of the state in uneven development; dynamics of urban growth and decline; regional development in California. (Same course as GEO 245.) (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Quarter.
CRD 246The Political Economy of Transnational Migration (4) Active
Lecture—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Theoretical perspectives and empirical research on social, cultural, political, and economic processes of transnational migration to the U.S. Discussion of conventional theories will precede contemporary comparative perspectives on class, race, ethnicity, citizenship, and the ethnic economy. (Same course as GEO 246.) (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Winter Quarter.
CRD 247Transformation of Work (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in history or social science degree program or consent of instructor. Exploration of the ways that the experience, organization, and systems of work are being reconfigured in the late twentieth century. The impacts of economic restructuring on local communities and workers. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 248Social Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Theories and comparative histories of modern welfare states and social policy in relation to legal/normative, organizational, and administrative aspects. Analysis of specific social issues within the U.S./California context. Not open for credit to students having completed CRD 248A and CRD 248B. (Same course as GEO 248.) (Letter.) Effective: 2013 Fall Quarter.
CRD 248ASocial Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities I (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Theories and comparative histories of modern welfare states. Theories of welfare and social policy in relation to normative, organizational, and administrative aspects of welfare and social policy. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
CRD 248BSocial Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities II (2) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. Concurrent enrollment in course 248A. Analysis of a specific set of social issues within the US/California context. Issues may include poverty, hunger, housing, health, family, disability, economic opportunity, affirmative action orientations, gender, old age, or special social groups. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
CRD 249Media Innovation and Community Development (4) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Open to graduate students. Role of innovative media in communities and social change. Studies historical, practical and theoretical issues involving media in community organizing, social justice movements, democracy initiatives, and economic justice. (Letter.) Effective: 2014 Spring Quarter.
CRD 250Professional Skills for Community Development (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s); Project (Term Project)—2 hour(s); Fieldwork; Extensive Writing/Discussion. Prerequisite(s): CRD 240. Priority enrollment for Masters and Ph.D. students in Community and Regional Development. Help students develop the practical skills needed to work professionally in organizations that are involved in community development. Provides an overview of community development planning, project management, and consultation skills. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 290Seminar (1) Review all entries Historical
Seminar—1 hour(s). Analysis of research in applied behavioral sciences. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
CRD 290Community Development Seminar (1) Review all entries Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Pass One restricted to graduate students in the CDGG masters program; open to other programs by consent of the instructor. Speaker series on key topics in community development. May be repeated for credit CDGG MS students must take four quarters to satisfy the MS degree requirements; may take course as many times as student chooses. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
CRD 292Graduate Internship (1-12) Active
Internship—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Individually designed supervised internship, off campus, in community or institutional setting. Developed with advice of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit Student may register in more than one internship section per term. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 293Community Development Graduate Proseminar (1) Active
Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Community Development graduate group. Restricted to first year Community Development graduate students only. Introduction to graduate training in Community Development. Seminar designed to introduce students entering graduate work in the Community Development Graduate Group to its ongoing activities. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 298Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. (Letter.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Review all entries Historical
Variable—3-12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2012 Fall Quarter.
CRD 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Review all entries Discontinued
Variable—3-12 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.