Anthropology

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

The A.B. Major

Anthropology is the systematic study of humans. The student of anthropology learns about human biology, ecology, and social life—past and present—and gains a broad understanding of humans and societies. It is a diverse field, and the courses, faculty, and degree programs at UC Davis are subdivided into two wings—Evolutionary and Sociocultural.

Evolutionary A.B. Evolutionary anthropologists are united by their common application of science and evolutionary theory to understand the behavior, ecology, history, and evolution of humans and non-human primates, as individuals and as societies. These topics may be approached through archaeology, human behavioral ecology, paleoanthropology, primatology, genetics, biogeography, and conservation biology. Archaeology is the study of history or prehistory by analysis of a people's artifacts, or their material culture, with the goal of reconstructing culture history and human behavior. Human behavioral ecology is the study of how variation in ecology and social organization can help us understand variation in human behavior. Paleoanthropology is the study of human evolution through the fossil and archaeological records, drawing on relevant studies in biological anthropology, Paleolithic archaeology, genetics, and geology. Primatology is the study of behavior, ecology, and morphology of primates to address questions about the evolution and function of behavioral and morphological patterns in nonhuman primates and to test models of the origins of human morphology and behavior. Genetic anthropology uses DNA to address anthropological questions about population histories, migrations, mixing, and adaptations to local contexts. Biogeography investigates the biology behind the geographic distribution of species and human cultures. Conservation biology explores the causes of loss of biological diversity—in this department, it focuses on threatened non-human primates and the conservation of natural resources by a rapidly growing population. A Bachelor of Arts degree provides broad training that includes all subfields of Anthropology.

Sociocultural. Sociocultural anthropologists study the varied ways in which people around the world organize their lives and interpret the circumstances in which they operate. Their main method is extended field research, which combines attention to global issues with the close study of human relations and culture. Among the themes addressed in the department's undergraduate courses are globalization and transnationalism; human ecology and environmental change; cultures of healing, health and medicine, the anthropology of law and global legal processes, the study of resistance, rebellion, and social control, the global spread of media and technology; migration, multiculturalism and urban life; colonialism and neocolonialism development and post-development; race, class and gender; politics and the political; cultures of everyday life; language use and discourse; and self, identity and family. The track in sociocultural anthropology thus offers a rich set of resources for understanding and engaging pressing issues in a globalizing world characterized by new forms of international culture and community as well as by increasing material inequality and political volatility.

The Program. The Bachelor of Arts program is divided into two tracks, Sociocultural and Evolutionary, which parallel the two wings described above. Students interested in the study of recent and contemporary human languages and societies should follow the Sociocultural Track. To obtain a A.B. degree in sociocultural anthropology, each student is required to complete courses that provide (1) foundational skills, (2) language and cultural skills, (3) comprehensive skills, and (4) specialized skills. Students interested in the study of archaeology; primate studies; or human biology, ecology or origins should follow the Evolutionary Track. The A.B. degree offered by the Evolutionary Track provides general training in anthropology from an evolutionary perspective. The Evolutionary Track also offers a B.S. degree that requires lower division coursework in math and science and upper division coursework in biological anthropology and closely related disciplines. Students planning on pursuing jobs in medical fields after graduation may be especially interested in the B.S. degree.

Students in both tracks are encouraged to gain practical experience through courses taken while studying abroad (under the administration of the UC Davis Study Abroad) and through undergraduate research or internships performed for credit (under ANT 192, 198, or 199 units provided by the advising office). Students showing exceptional ability are welcome to seek permission from instructors to participate in graduate seminars offered by the department.

Career Opportunities. A Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology is suited for students seeking a solid liberal arts education. With its broad goal to facilitate understanding across lines of cultural difference, sociocultural anthropology prepares students for lives that are influenced by increasingly pervasive cultural exchange, as well as cultural conflict, around the world. The program serves as excellent preparation for careers in which inter-cultural skills are increasingly needed, including social and environmental activism, business, diplomacy and social administration, journalism, law, education and international relations. Students that focus on evolutionary processes will be well prepared to enter fields such as medical or health anthropology, museum studies, cultural resource management and wildlife conservation. A degree in anthropology with appropriate courses in education is good preparation for high school teaching in social, biological, and physical sciences. It also provides the foundation for advanced study leading to careers in college-level teaching and research.

Major Advisor. Consult Department advising office in 1282 Social Sciences and Humanities Building.

Honors Program. Candidates for high or highest honors in Anthropology must write a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member. The thesis project will have a minimum duration of two quarters. Honors candidates must take at least six units of Anthropology 194H. Only students who, at the end of their junior year (135 units), have attained a cumulative grade point average of 3.500 in Anthropology courses will be eligible for the honors program. The quality of the thesis work will be the primary determinant for designating high or highest honors at graduation.

Teaching Credential Subject Representative. See the Teaching Credential/M.A. Program.

Graduate Study

The Department offers a program of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office and at Graduate Studies.


A.B. Anthropology - Evolutionary Emphasis
Units: 63-71
Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 21-23
ANT 001
Human Evolutionary Biology (Active)
4
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
ANT 003
Introduction to Archaeology (Active)
4
Choose one:
4-5
ANT 015
From Birth to Death: The Evolution of the Human Life Cycle (Active)
5
ANT 023
Introduction to World Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 024
Ancient Crops and People (Active)
4
ANT 050
Evolution and Human Nature (Active)
4
ANT 054
Introduction to Primatology (Active)
4
Choose one:
4-5
ANT 013
Scientific Method in Physical Anthropology (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
STA 013
Elementary Statistics (Active)
4
STA 032
Gateway to Statistical Data Science (Active)
4
STA 100
Applied Statistics for Biological Sciences (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 42-48
Choose two:
7-10
ANT 101
Ecology, Nature, and Society (Active)
4
ANT 103
Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Conservation (Active)
4
ANT 105
Evolution of Societies and Cultures (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128A
Kinship and Social Organization (Active)
4
ANT 141B
Ethnography of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 154A
The Evolution of Primate Behavior (Active)
5
ANT 154B
Primate Evolutionary Ecology (Active)
5
ANT 154C
Primate Behavior: Methods & Experimental Design (Active)
2
ANT 154CL
Laboratory in Primate Behavior (Active)
4
ANT 158
The Evolution of Females and Males: Biological Perspective (Active)
4
ANT 178
Hunter-Gatherers (Active)
4
Choose one:
3-5
ANT 153
Human Biological Variation (Active)
5
ANT 157
Anthropological Genetics (Active)
3
ANT 159
Molecular Anthropology of Native America (Active)
4
Choose one:
4-5
ANT 151
Primate Evolution (Active)
4
ANT 152
Human Evolution (Active)
5
Choose one:
4
ANT 170
Archeological Theory and Method (Active)
4
ANT 172
New World Prehistory: The First Arrivals (Active)
4
ANT 173
New World Prehistory: Archaic Adaptations (Active)
4
ANT 174
European Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 175
Andean Prehistory: Archaeology of the Incas and their Ancestors (Active)
4
ANT 176
Prehistory of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 177
African Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 179
Asian Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 180
Zooarchaeology (Active)
4
ANT 182
Archaeometry (Active)
4
ANT 183
Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (Active)
4
ANT 184
Prehistoric Technology: The Material Aspects of Prehistoric Adaptation (Active)
4
ANT 185
Lithic Analysis (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
ANT 100
Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 104N
Cultural Politics of the Environment (Active)
4
ANT 109
Visualization in Science: A Critical Introduction (Active)
4
ANT 110
Language and Sociocultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 117
Language and Society (Active)
4
ANT 120
Language and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 121
Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122B
Anthropology and Political Economy (Active)
4
ANT 123AN
Resistance, Rebellion, and Popular Movements (Active)
4
ANT 124
Religion in Society and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 125A
Structuralism and Symbolism (Active)
4
ANT 125B
Postmodernism(s) and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
ANT 127
Urban Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128B
Self, Identity, and Family (Active)
4
ANT 129
Health and Medicine in a Global Context (Active)
4
ANT 130A
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Active)
4
ANT 131
Ecology and Politics (Active)
4
ANT 132
Psychological Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 133
Anthropology of Ocean Worlds (Active)
4
ANT 134
Buddhism in Global Culture (Active)
4
ANT 135
Media Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 136
Ethnographic Film (Active)
4
ANT 137
Meditation and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 138
Ethnographic Research Methods in Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 139AN
Race, Class, Gender Systems (Active)
4
ANT 139BN
Gender and Sexuality (Active)
4
ANT 140A
Cultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (Active)
4
ANT 140B
Cultures and Societies of East and South Africa (Active)
4
ANT 141B
Ethnography of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 142
Peoples of the Middle East (Active)
4
ANT 143A
Ethnology of Southeast Asia (Active)
4
ANT 144
Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (Active)
4
ANT 145
Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (Active)
4
ANT 146N
Topics in the Anthropology of Europe (Active)
4
ANT 147
Modern South Asia Cinema (Active)
4
ANT 148A
Culture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (Active)
4
ANT 149A
Traditional Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 149B
Contemporary Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 186A
Museum Studies: Analysis of Native American Basketry (Active)
4
Choose 20 additional units from any upper division evolutionary track Anthropology courses (see list below):
20
ANT 101
Ecology, Nature, and Society (Active)
4
ANT 103
Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Conservation (Active)
4
ANT 105
Evolution of Societies and Cultures (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128A
Kinship and Social Organization (Active)
4
ANT 141B
Ethnography of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 151
Primate Evolution (Active)
4
ANT 152
Human Evolution (Active)
5
ANT 153
Human Biological Variation (Active)
5
ANT 154A
The Evolution of Primate Behavior (Active)
5
ANT 154B
Primate Evolutionary Ecology (Active)
5
ANT 154C
Primate Behavior: Methods & Experimental Design (Active)
2
ANT 154CL
Laboratory in Primate Behavior (Active)
4
ANT 156A
Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 156B
Advanced Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 157
Anthropological Genetics (Active)
3
ANT 157L
Laboratory in Anthropological Genetics (Active)
2
ANT 158
The Evolution of Females and Males: Biological Perspective (Active)
4
ANT 159
Molecular Anthropology of Native America (Active)
4
ANT 160
Neandertals and Modern Human Origins (Active)
4
ANT 170
Archeological Theory and Method (Active)
4
ANT 172
New World Prehistory: The First Arrivals (Active)
4
ANT 173
New World Prehistory: Archaic Adaptations (Active)
4
ANT 174
European Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 175
Andean Prehistory: Archaeology of the Incas and their Ancestors (Active)
4
ANT 176
Prehistory of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 177
African Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 178
Hunter-Gatherers (Active)
4
ANT 179
Asian Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 180
Zooarchaeology (Active)
4
ANT 181
Archaeological Field Methods (Active)
4
ANT 181L
Field Course in Archeological Methods (Active)
4
ANT 182
Archaeometry (Active)
4
ANT 183
Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (Active)
4
ANT 184
Prehistoric Technology: The Material Aspects of Prehistoric Adaptation (Active)
4
ANT 185
Lithic Analysis (Active)
4
ANT 186A
Museum Studies: Analysis of Native American Basketry (Active)
4
A.B. Anthropology - Sociocultural Emphasis
Units: 63-67
Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 21-23
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
Choose two:
8
ANT 001
Human Evolutionary Biology (Active)
4
ANT 003
Introduction to Archaeology (Active)
4
ANT 004
Introduction to Anthropological Linguistics (Active)
4
Choose one of the following two options:
8-10
(1) Two additional quarters of the foreign language used to meet the L&S language requirement.
8-10
(2) Two lower division sociocultural courses from the following:
8-10
ANT 020
Comparative Cultures (Active)
4
ANT 030
Sexualities (Active)
4
ANT 032
Drugs, Science and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 034
Cultures of Consumerism (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 42-44
ANT 100
Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (Active)
4
Choose two upper division area-focus sociocultural track courses:
8
ANT 140A
Cultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (Active)
4
ANT 140B
Cultures and Societies of East and South Africa (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 142
Peoples of the Middle East (Active)
4
ANT 143A
Ethnology of Southeast Asia (Active)
4
ANT 144
Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (Active)
4
ANT 145
Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (Active)
4
ANT 146N
Topics in the Anthropology of Europe (Active)
4
ANT 147
Modern South Asia Cinema (Active)
4
ANT 148A
Culture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (Active)
4
ANT 149A
Traditional Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 149B
Contemporary Japanese Society (Active)
4
Choose one of the following two options in (see list below identifying upper division sociocultural courses; see list above identifying evolutionary track courses):
30-32
(1) Eight additional upper division anthropology courses (two courses may be in the evolutionary track; and up to six units can be Anthropology 192, 194H, 198, or 199 units)
30-32
(2) Eight additional upper division courses that may combine six sociocultural track courses and either eight units of Study Abroad credit or two related courses in a single academic discipline (including but not limited to: African American and African Studies, American Studies, Art Studio, Art History, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Communication, Community and Regional Development, Design, Economics, East Asian Studies, History, Linguistics, Middle East and South Asian Studies, Music, Native American Studies, Nature and Culture, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Sociology, Textiles and Clothing, Theatre and Dance, Women and Gender Studies)
30-32
Sociocultural track upper division courses:
 
Note: Sociocultural track courses at the upper division level are those with numbers from 100 to 149B, with the exception of 101, 103, 105, 128A, and 141B. Area-focus sociocultural track courses are those that refer in their titles to one or more peoples or regions of the world.
 
ANT 100
Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 104N
Cultural Politics of the Environment (Active)
4
ANT 109
Visualization in Science: A Critical Introduction (Active)
4
ANT 110
Language and Sociocultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 117
Language and Society (Active)
4
ANT 120
Language and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 121
Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122B
Anthropology and Political Economy (Active)
4
ANT 123AN
Resistance, Rebellion, and Popular Movements (Active)
4
ANT 124
Religion in Society and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 125A
Structuralism and Symbolism (Active)
4
ANT 125B
Postmodernism(s) and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
ANT 127
Urban Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128B
Self, Identity, and Family (Active)
4
ANT 129
Health and Medicine in a Global Context (Active)
4
ANT 130A
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Active)
4
ANT 130BN
Migration and the Politics of Place and Identity (Active)
4
ANT 131
Ecology and Politics (Active)
4
ANT 132
Psychological Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 133
Anthropology of Ocean Worlds (Active)
4
ANT 134
Buddhism in Global Culture (Active)
4
ANT 135
Media Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 136
Ethnographic Film (Active)
4
ANT 137
Meditation and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 138
Ethnographic Research Methods in Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 139AN
Race, Class, Gender Systems (Active)
4
ANT 139BN
Gender and Sexuality (Active)
4
ANT 140A
Cultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (Active)
4
ANT 140B
Cultures and Societies of East and South Africa (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 142
Peoples of the Middle East (Active)
4
ANT 143A
Ethnology of Southeast Asia (Active)
4
ANT 144
Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (Active)
4
ANT 145
Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (Active)
4
ANT 146N
Topics in the Anthropology of Europe (Active)
4
ANT 147
Modern South Asia Cinema (Active)
4
ANT 148A
Culture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (Active)
4
ANT 149A
Traditional Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 149B
Contemporary Japanese Society (Active)
4
Total: 63-67

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

The B.S. Major

Anthropology is the systematic study of humans. The student of anthropology learns about human biology, ecology, and social life—past and present—and gains a broad understanding of humans and societies. The Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology is interdisciplinary in nature since it requires lower division coursework in math and science and upper division coursework in biological anthropology and closely related disciplines.

The Program. Evolutionary anthropologists are united by their common application of science and evolutionary theory to understand the behavior, ecology, history, and evolution of humans and non-human primates, as individuals and as societies. These topics may be approached through archaeology, human behavioral ecology, paleoanthropology, primatology, genetics, biogeography, and conservation biology. Archaeology is the study of history or prehistory by analysis of a people's artifacts, or their material culture, with the goal of reconstructing culture history and human behavior. Human behavioral ecology is the study of how variation in ecology and social organization can help us understand variation in human behavior. Paleoanthropology is the study of human evolution through the fossil and archaeological records, drawing on relevant studies in biological anthropology, Paleolithic archaeology, genetics, and geology. Primatology is the study of behavior, ecology, and morphology of primates to address questions about the evolution and function of behavioral and morphological patterns in nonhuman primates and to test models of the origins of human morphology and behavior. Genetic anthropology uses DNA to address anthropological questions about population histories, migrations, mixing, and adaptations to local contexts. Biogeography investigates the biology behind the geographic distribution of species and human cultures. Conservation biology explores the causes of loss of biological diversity—in this department, it focuses on threatened non-human primates and the conservation of natural resources by a rapidly growing population. A Bachelor of Science degree, in addition to core evolutionary anthropology courses, includes the introductory sequences of biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, and calculus, as well as genetics and ecology.

Students are encouraged to gain practical experience through undergraduate research or internships performed for credit (under ANT 192, 198, or 199 units provided by the advising office). Students showing exceptional ability are welcome to seek permission from instructors to participate in graduate seminars offered by the department.

Career Opportunities. A Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology combines a solid liberal arts education with training in the life and physical sciences. Through its interdisciplinary nature, a Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology provides the educational background for careers in the biological sciences and a variety of health professions including pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary, fields which increasingly need professionals with training in the social and behavioral sciences. In addition, students will be well prepared to enter fields such as medical or health anthropology, forensic sciences, museum studies, cultural resource management, and wildlife conservation. A Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology with appropriate courses in education is good preparation for high school teaching in social, biological, and physical sciences. It also provides the foundation for advanced study leading to careers in college-level teaching and research.

Major Advisor. Consult Department advising office in 1282 Social Sciences and Humanities Building.

Honors Program. Candidates for high or highest honors in Anthropology must write a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member. The thesis project will have a minimum duration of two quarters. Honors candidates must take at least six units of Anthropology 194H. Only students who, at the end of their junior year (135 units), have attained a cumulative grade point average of 3.500 in Anthropology courses will be eligible for the honors program. The quality of the thesis work will be the primary determinant for designating high or highest honors at graduation.

Teaching Credential Subject Representative. See the Teaching Credential/M.A. Program.

Graduate Study

The Department offers a program of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office and at Graduate Studies.

Preparatory Subject Matter
Units: 53-58
ANT 001
Human Evolutionary Biology (Active)
4
ANT 002
Cultural Anthropology (Active)
5
ANT 003
Introduction to Archaeology (Active)
4
BIS 002A
Introduction to Biology: Essentials of Life on Earth (Active)
5
BIS 002B
Introduction to Biology: Principles of Ecology and Evolution (Active)
5
BIS 002C
Introduction to Biology: Biodiversity and the Tree of Life (Active)
5
CHE 002A
General Chemistry (Active)
5
CHE 002B
General Chemistry (Active)
5
and
CHE 008A
Organic Chemistry: Brief Course (Active)
2
CHE 008B
Organic Chemistry: Brief Course (Active)
4
or
CHE 118A
Organic Chemistry for Health and Life Sciences (Active)
4
CHE 118B
Organic Chemistry for Health and Life Sciences (Active)
4
MAT 016A
Short Calculus (Active)
3
MAT 016B
Short Calculus (Active)
3
MAT 016C
Short Calculus (Active)
3
or
MAT 017A
Calculus for Biology and Medicine (Active)
4
MAT 017B
Calculus for Biology and Medicine (Active)
4
MAT 017C
Calculus for Biology and Medicine (Active)
4
or
MAT 021A
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021B
Calculus (Active)
4
MAT 021C
Calculus (Active)
4
Choose one:
4-5
ANT 013
Scientific Method in Physical Anthropology (Active)
4
SOC 046B
Introduction to Social Research (Active)
5
STA 013
Elementary Statistics (Active)
4
STA 032
Gateway to Statistical Data Science (Active)
4
STA 100
Applied Statistics for Biological Sciences (Active)
4
Depth Subject Matter
Units: 45
Choose one:
4-5
ANT 151
Primate Evolution (Active)
4
ANT 152
Human Evolution (Active)
5
Choose one:
3-5
ANT 153
Human Biological Variation (Active)
5
ANT 157
Anthropological Genetics (Active)
3
ANT 159
Molecular Anthropology of Native America (Active)
4
Choose one:
5
ANT 154A
The Evolution of Primate Behavior (Active)
5
ANT 154B
Primate Evolutionary Ecology (Active)
5
Three additional upper division courses in anthropology.
9-12
BIS 101
Genes and Gene Expression (Active)
4
EVE 100
Introduction to Evolution (Active)
4
Additional units from the list below to achieve a minimum of 45 upper division units:
10-16
ANT 101
Ecology, Nature, and Society (Active)
4
ANT 103
Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Conservation (Active)
4
ANT 105
Evolution of Societies and Cultures (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128A
Kinship and Social Organization (Active)
4
ANT 151
Primate Evolution (Active)
4
ANT 152
Human Evolution (Active)
5
ANT 153
Human Biological Variation (Active)
5
ANT 154A
The Evolution of Primate Behavior (Active)
5
ANT 154B
Primate Evolutionary Ecology (Active)
5
ANT 154C
Primate Behavior: Methods & Experimental Design (Active)
2
ANT 154CL
Laboratory in Primate Behavior (Active)
4
ANT 156A
Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 156B
Advanced Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 157
Anthropological Genetics (Active)
3
ANT 157L
Laboratory in Anthropological Genetics (Active)
2
ANT 158
The Evolution of Females and Males: Biological Perspective (Active)
4
ANT 159
Molecular Anthropology of Native America (Active)
4
ANT 180
Zooarchaeology (Active)
4
ANT 182
Archaeometry (Active)
4
ANT 185
Lithic Analysis (Active)
4
APC 100
Comparative Vertebrate Organology (Active)
4
BIS 102
Structure and Function of Biomolecules (Active)
3
BIS 103
Bioenergetics and Metabolism (Active)
3
CHA 101
Human Gross Anatomy (Active)
4
CHA 101L
Human Gross Anatomy Laboratory (Active)
3
ESP 100
General Ecology (Active)
4
EVE 101
Introduction to Ecology (Active)
4
EVE 102
Population and Quantitative Genetics (Active)
4
EVE 103
Phylogeny, Speciation and Macroevolution (Active)
4
EVE 104
Community Ecology (Active)
4
EVE 105
Phylogenetic Analysis of Vertebrate Structure (Active)
4
EVE 138
Ecology of Tropical Latitudes (Active)
5
EVE 141
Principles of Systematics (Active)
3
EVE 147
Biogeography (Active)
4
EVE 149
Evolution of Ecological Systems (Active)
4
EVE 175
Computational Genetics (Active)
3
GEL 107
Earth History: Paleobiology (Active)
3
GEL 107L
Earth History: Paleobiology Laboratory (Active)
2
GEL 108
Earth History: Paleoclimates (Active)
3
GEL 144
Historical Ecology (Active)
3
GEL 146
Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry (Active)
3
MCB 120L
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratory (Active)
3
MCB 121
Advanced Molecular Biology (Active)
3
MCB 150
Developmental Biology (Active)
4
MCB 160L
Principles of Genetics Laboratory (Active)
5
MCB 162
Human Genetics and Genomics (Active)
3
MCB 163
Developmental Genetics (Active)
3
MCB 164
Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics (Active)
3
NPB 101
Systemic Physiology (Active)
5
NPB 101L
Systemic Physiology Laboratory (Active)
3
NPB 102
Animal Behavior (Active)
3
NPB 123
Comparative Vertebrate Organology (Active)
4
NPB 124
Comparative Neuroanatomy (Active)
3
NPB 150
Advanced Animal Behavior (Active)
4
NPB 152
Hormones and Behavior (Active)
3
PSC 101
Introduction to Biological Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 113
Developmental Psychobiology (Active)
4
PSC 121
Physiological Psychology (Active)
4
PSC 122
Advanced Animal Behavior (Active)
4
PSC 123
Hormones and Behavior (Active)
3
PSC 124
Comparative Neuroanatomy (Active)
3
STA 104
Applied Statistical Methods: Nonparametric Statistics (Active)
4
STA 106
Applied Statistical Methods: Analysis of Variance (Active)
4
STA 108
Applied Statistical Methods: Regression Analysis (Active)
4
STA 130A
Mathematical Statistics: Brief Course (Active)
4
STA 130B
Mathematical Statistics: Brief Course (Active)
4
STS 131
Darwin (Active)
4
WFC 141
Behavioral Ecology (Active)
4
WFC 154
Conservation Biology (Active)
4
Total: 98-103

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

Graduate Study. The Department offers a program of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office and at Graduate Studies.

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

Graduate Study. The Department offers a program of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Further information regarding graduate study may be obtained at the Department office and at Graduate Studies.

(College of Letters and Science)

Lynne A. Isbell, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department

Department Office. 328 Young Hall; 530-752-0745; http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu

Faculty. http://anthropology.ucdavis.edu/directory-of-people

Minor Advisor. Consult Department office in 1282 Social Sciences & Humanities.


General Emphasis
Units: 19-21
Choose one:
3-5
ANT 101
Ecology, Nature, and Society (Active)
4
ANT 103
Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Conservation (Active)
4
ANT 105
Evolution of Societies and Cultures (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128A
Kinship and Social Organization (Active)
4
ANT 151
Primate Evolution (Active)
4
ANT 152
Human Evolution (Active)
5
ANT 153
Human Biological Variation (Active)
5
ANT 154A
The Evolution of Primate Behavior (Active)
5
ANT 157
Anthropological Genetics (Active)
3
ANT 158
The Evolution of Females and Males: Biological Perspective (Active)
4
ANT 159
Molecular Anthropology of Native America (Active)
4
Choose one:
4
ANT 170
Archeological Theory and Method (Active)
4
ANT 172
New World Prehistory: The First Arrivals (Active)
4
ANT 173
New World Prehistory: Archaic Adaptations (Active)
4
ANT 174
European Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 176
Prehistory of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 177
African Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 179
Asian Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 180
Zooarchaeology (Active)
4
ANT 182
Archaeometry (Active)
4
ANT 183
Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (Active)
4
ANT 184
Prehistoric Technology: The Material Aspects of Prehistoric Adaptation (Active)
4
ANT 185
Lithic Analysis (Active)
4
Choose one from below or any other sociocultural track course that refers in its title to one or more peoples or regions of the world:
4
ANT 140A
Cultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (Active)
4
ANT 140B
Cultures and Societies of East and South Africa (Active)
4
ANT 141B
Ethnography of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 141C
People of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (Active)
4
ANT 142
Peoples of the Middle East (Active)
4
ANT 143A
Ethnology of Southeast Asia (Active)
4
ANT 144
Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (Active)
4
ANT 145
Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (Active)
4
ANT 146N
Topics in the Anthropology of Europe (Active)
4
ANT 147
Modern South Asia Cinema (Active)
4
ANT 148A
Culture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (Active)
4
ANT 149A
Traditional Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 149B
Contemporary Japanese Society (Active)
4
ANT 178
Hunter-Gatherers (Active)
4
Choose two:
8
ANT 100
Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 104N
Cultural Politics of the Environment (Active)
4
ANT 109
Visualization in Science: A Critical Introduction (Active)
4
ANT 110
Language and Sociocultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 117
Language and Society (Active)
4
ANT 120
Language and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 121
Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122B
Anthropology and Political Economy (Active)
4
ANT 123AN
Resistance, Rebellion, and Popular Movements (Active)
4
ANT 124
Religion in Society and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 125A
Structuralism and Symbolism (Active)
4
ANT 125B
Postmodernism(s) and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
ANT 127
Urban Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128B
Self, Identity, and Family (Active)
4
ANT 129
Health and Medicine in a Global Context (Active)
4
ANT 130A
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Active)
4
ANT 130BN
Migration and the Politics of Place and Identity (Active)
4
ANT 131
Ecology and Politics (Active)
4
ANT 132
Psychological Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 133
Anthropology of Ocean Worlds (Active)
4
ANT 134
Buddhism in Global Culture (Active)
4
ANT 135
Media Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 136
Ethnographic Film (Active)
4
ANT 137
Meditation and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 138
Ethnographic Research Methods in Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 139AN
Race, Class, Gender Systems (Active)
4
ANT 139BN
Gender and Sexuality (Active)
4
Archaeology Emphasis
Units: 20
ANT 170
Archeological Theory and Method (Active)
4
Choose two:
8
ANT 172
New World Prehistory: The First Arrivals (Active)
4
ANT 173
New World Prehistory: Archaic Adaptations (Active)
4
ANT 174
European Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 175
Andean Prehistory: Archaeology of the Incas and their Ancestors (Active)
4
ANT 176
Prehistory of California and the Great Basin (Active)
4
ANT 177
African Prehistory (Active)
4
ANT 178
Hunter-Gatherers (Active)
4
ANT 179
Asian Prehistory (Active)
4
Choose two:
8
ANT 156A
Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 156B
Advanced Human Osteology (Active)
4
ANT 180
Zooarchaeology (Active)
4
ANT 181
Archaeological Field Methods (Active)
4
ANT 181L
Field Course in Archeological Methods (Active)
4
ANT 182
Archaeometry (Active)
4
ANT 183
Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (Active)
4
ANT 184
Prehistoric Technology: The Material Aspects of Prehistoric Adaptation (Active)
4
ANT 185
Lithic Analysis (Active)
4
Evolutionary Emphasis
Units: 18-25
Any five upper division Evolutionary Anthropology courses. Note: Evolutionary track courses at the upper division level are those with numbers 101, 103, 105, 122A, 128A, 141B, 141C, and 151-185.
18-25
Sociocultural Emphasis
Units: 20
ANT 100
Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (Active)
4
One upper division area-focus sociocultural track course; area-focus sociocultural track courses are those that are numbered between 140A-149.
4
One additional upper division Sociocultural Anthropology course. Sociocultural track courses at the upper division level are those with numbers from 100 to 149B, with the exception of 101, 103, 105, 128A, and 141B.
4
Choose two:
8
ANT 104N
Cultural Politics of the Environment (Active)
4
ANT 109
Visualization in Science: A Critical Introduction (Active)
4
ANT 110
Language and Sociocultural Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 117
Language and Society (Active)
4
ANT 120
Language and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 121
Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122A
Economic Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 122B
Anthropology and Political Economy (Active)
4
ANT 123AN
Resistance, Rebellion, and Popular Movements (Active)
4
ANT 124
Religion in Society and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 125A
Structuralism and Symbolism (Active)
4
ANT 125B
Postmodernism(s) and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 126A
Anthropology of Development (Active)
4
ANT 126B
Women and Development (Active)
4
ANT 127
Urban Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 128B
Self, Identity, and Family (Active)
4
ANT 129
Health and Medicine in a Global Context (Active)
4
ANT 130A
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Active)
4
ANT 130BN
Migration and the Politics of Place and Identity (Active)
4
ANT 131
Ecology and Politics (Active)
4
ANT 132
Psychological Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 133
Anthropology of Ocean Worlds (Active)
4
ANT 134
Buddhism in Global Culture (Active)
4
ANT 135
Media Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 136
Ethnographic Film (Active)
4
ANT 137
Meditation and Culture (Active)
4
ANT 138
Ethnographic Research Methods in Anthropology (Active)
4
ANT 139AN
Race, Class, Gender Systems (Active)
4
ANT 139BN
Gender and Sexuality (Active)
4
Total: 18-25
Courses in ANT:
ANT 001Human Evolutionary Biology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Processes and course of human evolution; primatology; biological and social diversity within Homo sapiens; human paleontology. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WE. Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
ANT 001YHuman Evolutionary Biology (Hybrid Version) (4) Active
Web Virtual Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Lecture/Discussion—1.5 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s). Evolutionary theory and mechanisms of evolution; basic population and quantitative genetics; primatology; biological and cultural diversity within Homo sapiens; paleoanthropology. Students may not take both ANT 1 and ANT 1Y for credit. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 002Cultural Anthropology (5) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Introduction to cultural diversity in its many forms and methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Relational dynamic of culture, history, and power in constituting "social facts" and "realities." Critical thinking of contemporary concerns. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 002Cultural Anthropology (5) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Introduction to cultural diversity in its many forms and methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Relational dynamic of culture, history, and power in constituting "social facts" and "realities." Critical thinking of contemporary concerns. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
ANT 003Introduction to Archaeology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Development of archaeology as an anthropological study; objectives and methods of modern archaeology. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, SS. Effective: 2015 Spring Quarter.
ANT 004Introduction to Anthropological Linguistics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Exploration of the role of language in social interaction and world view, minority languages and dialects, bilingualism, literacy, the social motivation of language change. Introduction of analytical techniques of linguistics and demonstration of their relevance to language in sociocultural issues. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 005Proseminar in Biological Anthropology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 1 or ANT 1Y recommended. Course primarily for majors. Integration of related disciplines in the study of biological anthropology through discussion and research projects. Principal emphasis in human adaptation to the environment. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 013Scientific Method in Physical Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s); Fieldwork—1 hour(s). Skills for scientific thinking; designing, implementing, analyzing, interpreting, presenting, and criticizing research. Collection and analysis of original data. Basic statistical methods. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, VL, WE. Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
ANT 015From Birth to Death: The Evolution of the Human Life Cycle (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Introduction to the biology of birth, childhood, marriage, the family, old age, and death. Examines comparative characteristics of nonhuman primates and other animals as well as cross-cultural variation in humans by study of selected cases. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Winter Quarter.
ANT 020Comparative Cultures (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the anthropological study of cultural diversity. Case studies of eight societies will be presented to illustrate and compare the distinctive features of major cultural regions of the world. Concludes with a discussion of modernization. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 023Introduction to World Prehistory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Broadly surveys patterns and changes in the human species' physical and cultural evolution from earliest evidence for "humanness" to recent development of large-scale complex societies or "civilizations." Lectures emphasize use of archaeology in reconstructing the past. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 024Ancient Crops and People (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The archaeological evidence for domestication of plants and the origins of agricultural societies. Anthropological context of agriculture and the effects on sexual division of labor, social inequality, wealth accumulation, warfare, human health, and sedentism. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
ANT 025Ancient Animals and People (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). History of human and animal relationships and how animals have influenced social and economic structures of past societies. Why, when and how humans used animals in the context of hunting, domestication, secondary products, ritual, companionship, and conservation. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2015 Winter Quarter.
ANT 026Mummies of the Ancient World (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). Archaeological approaches for studying mummies and the process of mummification in the ancient world. Analytical techniques used, environmental factors promoting mummification, and archaeological conservation of mummified bodies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2014 Fall Quarter.
ANT 027Great Adaptations: Genetic and Cultural Evolution in the Spread of Humanity (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). How humans adapted to diverse ecologies through cultural and genetic changes. Illustrations include evolution in response to disease, dietary, social, and communication challenges. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, SS, WC. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
ANT 028Prehistoric Origins of Art (2) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Interdisciplinary look at the earliest evidence for art and symbolic behavior. Method and techniques to investigate Prehistoric art. Interpretative framework and relevance for understanding the role of symbolic activities in traditional societies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2015 Winter Quarter.
ANT 029Vikings (2) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s). History of the Vikings through the Slavic and Mediterranean regions in the East and across the vast North Atlantic region to the west. Emphasis on archaeology and sagas to understand Viking culture from the 8th to 11th centuries. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2016 Spring Quarter.
ANT 030Sexualities (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Introduction to the study of sexuality, particularly to the meanings and social organization of same-sex sexual behavior across cultures and through time. Biological and cultural approaches will be compared, and current North American issues placed in a wider comparative context. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, SS, WC. Effective: 2005 Fall Quarter.
ANT 032Drugs, Science and Culture (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Drugs, politics, science, society in a cultural perspective: emphasis on roles of science, government and the media in shifting attitudes toward alcohol, marijuana, Prozac and other pharmaceuticals; drug laws, war on drugs and global trade in sugar, opium, cocaine. (Same course as STS 032.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
ANT 034Cultures of Consumerism (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s); Term Paper. Aspects of modern consumer cultures in capitalist and socialist countries. Transformations of material cultures over the past century. Case studies on the intersections of gender, class, and culture in everyday consumption practices. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
ANT 050Evolution and Human Nature (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Evolutionary analyses of human nature, beginning with Lamarck, Darwin, Spencer and contemporaries, and extending through social Darwinism controversies to contemporary evolutionary anthropology research on human diversity in economic, mating, life-history, and social behavior. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
ANT 054Introduction to Primatology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Basic survey of the primates as a separate order of mammals; natural history and evolution of primates; consideration of hypotheses for their origin. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, SL, WE. Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
ANT 098Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Variable. Primarily intended for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 099Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 100Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Discussion of the theoretical and philosophical developments in cultural anthropology from the 19th century to the present. No credit if taken ANT 137. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 100Theory in Social-Cultural Anthropology (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Discussion of the theoretical and philosophical developments in cultural anthropology from the 19th century to the present. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
ANT 101Ecology, Nature, and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 002 or ESP 030 or EVE 100 or BIS 101 recommended. Interdisciplinary study of diversity and change in human societies, using frameworks from anthropology, evolutionary ecology, history, archaeology, psychology, and other fields. Topics include population dynamics, subsistence transitions, family organization, disease, economics, warfare, politics, and resource conservation. (Same course as ESP 101.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 103Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Conservation (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 or GEL 001 or ESP 030 recommended. Integration of the interests of resident and indigenous peoples with the conservation of natural resources and ecosystems, using case study examples from both the developing and developed world. Not open for credit for students who have completed ANT 121N. (Former ANT 121N.). (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, OL, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 104NCultural Politics of the Environment (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Political economy of environmental struggles. Relationship between social inequality (based on race, class and/or gender) and ecological degradation. Articulation of local peoples, national policy, and the international global economy in the contestation over the use of environmental resources. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 134N. (Former ANT 134N.). (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 105Evolution of Societies and Cultures (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 002 or ESP 030 or EVE 100 or BIS 101 recommended. Interdisciplinary study of social and cultural evolution in humans. Culture as a system of inheritance,psychology of cultural learning, culture as an adaptive system,evolution of maladaptations, evolution of technology and institutions,evolutionary transitions in human history, coevolution of genetic and cultural variation. Only two units of credit for students who have completed ESP 101 or ANT 101 prior to fall 2004. (Same course as ESP 105. ) (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 107Law, Power, Violence (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Cultural dimensions of law and political power. Colonial and postcolonial legal regimes, bureaucratic reason, legalized violence, sovereign power, and human rights. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
ANT 109Visualization in Science: A Critical Introduction (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 or STS 001 or STS 020 recommended. Anthropological approaches to scientific visualization techniques, informatics, simulations. Examination of different visualization techniques toward understanding the work involved in producing them, critical assessment of their power and limits, especially when visualizations are used socially to make claims. (Same course as STS 109.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 110Language and Sociocultural Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Role of language analysis and linguistic theory in the development of sociocultural anthropology. Language, culture, and thought; the linguistic accomplishment of social action; language ideology; language and social power. Language as cultural mediator of politicoeconomic process. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 117Language and Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 004 or LIN 001 recommended; ANT 002 recommended. Consideration of language in its social context. Methods of data collection and analysis; identification of socially significant linguistic variables. Contributions of the study of contextualized speech to linguistic theory. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 120Language and Culture (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 004 or LIN 001 recommended; ANT 002 recommended. Culture, cognition, meaning, and interpretation; language and the classification of experience; communication and learning in crosscultural perspective. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 121Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Introduction to critical medical anthropology. Topics include anthropological analysis of bio-medicine, psychiatry, systems of knowledge and healing, the body, emotions, and clinical encounters in a cross-cultural perspective. (Same course as STS 121.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 122AEconomic Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The varieties of production, exchange, and consumption behavior in precapitalist economies, their interaction with culture and social-political organization, and the theories that account for these phenomena. The effects of capitalism on precapitalist sectors. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 122. (Former ANT 122.). (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2001 Winter Quarter.
ANT 122BAnthropology and Political Economy (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Survey of anthropological approaches to the study of political organizations; inter-relationships among political institutions, economic infrastructures and cultural complexity. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 123A. (Former ANT 123A.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 123ANResistance, Rebellion, and Popular Movements (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Analysis of popular protest in Third World and indigenous societies ranging from covert resistance to national revolts. Comparative case studies and theories of peasant rebellions, millenarian movements, social bandits, Indian "wars", ethnic and regional conflicts, gender and class conflicts. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 123B. (Former ANT 123B.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 124Religion in Society and Culture (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002. Discussion of anthropological theories of religion with emphasis on non-literate societies. Survey of shamanism, magic and witchcraft, ritual and symbols, and religious movements. Extensive discussion of ethnographic examples and analysis of social functions of religious institutions. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 124Religion in Society and Culture (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Discussion of anthropological theories of religion with emphasis on non-literate societies. Survey of shamanism, magic and witchcraft, ritual and symbols, and religious movements. Extensive discussion of ethnographic examples and analysis of social functions of religious institutions. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, WC, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
ANT 125AStructuralism and Symbolism (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Survey of anthropological approaches to understanding the logic of structuralism and symbolism in cultural analysis. Focus on how structural and symbolic interpretations relate to cultural and linguistic universals and to the philosophical basis of relativism in the social sciences. (Former course 125.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 125BPostmodernism(s) and Culture (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. U.S.-European postmodern condition. "Modernity" as an incomplete project for subordinated groups. The economic, social, technological and political conditions leading to postmodern aesthetics, in comparison with postcolonialism, feminism and minority discourse. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 126AAnthropology of Development (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Theories of development and current critiques. Colonial legacies and post-colonial realities. Roles of the state and NGOs, population migrations, changing gender identities, cash-earning strategies, and sustainability issues. Stresses importance of cultural understandings in development initiatives. Case studies emphasizing non-industrial societies. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 126. (Former ANT 126.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 126BWomen and Development (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Current Third World and Western development issues concerning women in agriculture, industry, international division of labor, political movements, revolutions, politics of health, education, family and reproduction. Impact of colonialism, capitalism, the world system, and international feminism on women and development. No credit if taken ANT 131. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 127Urban Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002; or Consent of Instructor. Survey of approaches to urban living: political structures, organization of labor, class relations, world views. The evolution of urban life and its contemporary dilemmas. Cross-cultural comparisons discussed through case studies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 128AKinship and Social Organization (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Comparative examination of personal kinship, descent, marriage, household and family organizations; the theories that account for variation, and recent advances in the treatment of these data. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 128. (Former ANT 128.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 128BSelf, Identity, and Family (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Exploration of self, identity, and family systems cross-culturally. Impact of class, gender, race, ethnicity, ruralization, urbanization, and globalization on notions of selfhood in different social/cultural systems. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 129. (Former ANT 129.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 129Health and Medicine in a Global Context (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Recent works in medical anthropology and the science studies of medicine dealing with social and cultural aspects of global health issues such as AIDS, pandemics, clinical trials, cultural differences in illnesses, diabetes, organ trafficking, medical technologies, illness narratives, and others. (Same course as STS 129.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 130ACultural Dimensions of Globalization (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Cultural dimensions of recent economic and political developments frequently termed "globalization." (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 130BNMigration and the Politics of Place and Identity (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Internal and international migration from an anthropological perspective, including causes, processes, and political, economic, and cultural effects of spatial mobility and displacement. Emphasizes the interplay of identity, place, and power in diverse cultural and historical contexts. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 123D. (Former ANT 123D.). (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 131Ecology and Politics (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Analysis of the complex interactions between ecological dynamics and political processes employing the emerging approach of political ecology. Case studies of environmental degradation (e.g., desertification, logging, mineral extraction, petroleum, water) from various cultural and geographic regions. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 132Psychological Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing/Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. History of the relationship between anthropology and psychoanalysis. Exploration of anthropology of emotions, colonial psychology, contemporary ethno-psychiatry, studies on personhood, possession, magic, altered states, subjectivity, and definitions of the normal and the pathological in different contexts and cultures. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 133Anthropology of Ocean Worlds (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Exploration of various oceanic cultures and their engagement with the sea. Piracy, smuggling, exchange, maritime legal regimes, offshore policing, media infrastructures, and ocean ecologies. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 134Buddhism in Global Culture (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Class size limited to 50 students. Buddhist meditation and ritual as a cultural system that adapts to global and local forces of change. Anthropological theory and method in understanding global culture transmission, including Buddhist reform movements in Asia and Buddhist practice in the West. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 135Media Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing. Examining human practices through their inscription in old and new media; evaluating the emergent fields of “cyber” and “digital” anthropology; and problematizing terms and concepts routinely deployed in studies of media worlds—platform, social media, hologram, algorithm, remediation, curation, animation. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 136Ethnographic Film (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Overview of the use of film in anthropology and its advantages and limitations in comparison to written ethnographic descriptions. Essential features of ethnographic films. Film production in anthropological research and problems encountered in producing films in the field. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 137Meditation and Culture (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Class size limited to 50 students. Study and practice of the relation between meditation and cultural conditioning; comparison of Buddhist practice with other cultural constructions of mind, body, brain, thought, emotion, and self. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 138Ethnographic Research Methods in Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Basic concepts in and approaches to ethnographic field research. Problem formulation, research design, qualitative and quantitative data collection procedures, and techniques for organizing, retrieving, and analyzing information. Ethnographic description and constructed inference. Students will organize and conduct individual research projects. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 139ANRace, Class, Gender Systems (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Comparative analysis of class/race/gender inequality, concentrating on the ways in which beliefs about descent, "blood," and biological difference interact with property and marital systems to affect the distribution of power in society. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 139. (Former ANT 139.). (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 139BNGender and Sexuality (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Gender and sexuality in foraging bands, horticultural and pastoral tribes, agricultural and industrial states. Debates on cultural evolution and distribution of gender hierarchies. Impact of politics, economics, religion, social practices, women's movements on gender and sexuality. Culture, nature and sexuality. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 130. (Former ANT 130.). (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 140ACultures and Societies of West and Central Africa (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Ethnographic survey of West Africa and Congo Basin with analyses of representative societies which illustrate problems of general theoretical concern. Major consideration will be the continuities and discontinuities between periods prior to European contact and the present. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 140BCultures and Societies of East and South Africa (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Ethnographic survey of Eastern and Southern Africa with analyses of selected societies which illustrate problems of interest to anthropologists. Major consideration will be given to continuities and discontinuities between periods prior to European contact and the present. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 141BEthnography of California and the Great Basin (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 002 recommended. Description and analysis of the native peoples of California and the Great Basin, and their lifeways at the time of European contact. (Former course 141C.) (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 141CPeople of the Arctic: Contemporary and Historic Cultures of the Circumpolar Region (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 or ANT 003 recommended. Social, economic, political, and religious lives of Russian, American, Canadian, and Greenlandic Arctic people (Yup'ik, Iñupiat, Inuit). Topics include Arctic ecosystems, archaeological record of human occupation, ethnohistorical and ethnographic accounts, arctic people in popular culture, and contemporary issues. (Letter.) Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 142Peoples of the Middle East (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Peoples of the Middle East (including North Africa). Discussions of class relations, kinship organization, sex/gender systems, religious beliefs and behavior, ethnic relations, political systems. Impact of world systems, political and religious movements and social change. (Former course 136.) (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 143AEthnology of Southeast Asia (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Patterns of culture and social organization from prehistory to the present, in the context of historical, ecological, economic, and political settings. Emphasis on the relation of ethnic minorities to national states. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 144Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Introduction to contemporary social structure of Latin America. Origins, maintenance and changes in inequality: economic responses to poverty, sociocultural responses to discrimination, and political responses to powerlessness. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 145Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002; or Consent of Instructor. South Asian cultures and societies with a focus on performance, embodiment, and space from several disciplinary fields. Topics may include colonialism, nationalism, religious traditions, media, popular culture, cities, social movements, modernity, body-cultures, identity, gender, and diasporas. (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2005 Winter Quarter.
ANT 146NTopics in the Anthropology of Europe (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Recent ethnographies of different nation-states and socio-political spaces in Europe. Topics include the question of old and new boundaries, historical and contemporary constructions of Europe, migration and ethnicity, citizenship, belonging, multiculturalism, and post/socialisms. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 147Modern South Asia Cinema (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Film Viewing—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper-division standing or consent of instructor. South Asian cinema of last 100 years in the context of cultural, social, and political changes. South Asian history, Independence, Partition, urban life, class, migration, postcolonial identity, diaspora, gender, sexuality, religion, sport, performance, etc. (Same course as MSA 131B and CTS 146B.) (Letter.) GE credit: AH, SS, VL, WC, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 148ACulture and Political Economy in Contemporary China (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Examining contemporary Chinese culture and political economy through reading ethnographic studies on recent transformations in rural and urban Chinese society. Special attention is given to state power, popular culture, spatial mobility, city space, and gender. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 149ATraditional Japanese Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 002 recommended. Patterns of culture and social organization from prehistoric to early twentieth-century Japan. Origins, prehistory, and traditional religious and political systems, marriage and kinship, language and culture. Changes and continuities in traditional and contemporary Japanese culture are addressed. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 149BContemporary Japanese Society (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to contemporary Japanese social structure, social organization, and patterns of culture. Analysis of ruralurban cultural continuities and contrasts, class relations, political and economic systems, kinship, sex/gender systems, contemporary religious beliefs and behavior, conflict, consensus, and cultural stereotypes. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 151Primate Evolution (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or BIS 002B or BIS 002C or EVE 010 recommended. Origin and relationships of the prosimians, monkeys, and apes. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 152Human Evolution (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 recommended. Nature and results of the evolutionary processes involved in the formation and differentiation of humankind. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 153Human Biological Variation (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or BIS 002B recommended. Origin, adaptive significance and methods of analysis of genetic differences among human populations. Special attention given to racial differences such as those in blood groups, plasma proteins, red cell enzymes, physiology, morphology, pigmentation and dermatoglyphics. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 154AThe Evolution of Primate Behavior (5) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 054 or EVE 010 recommended. Examines ecological diversity and evolution of social systems of prosimians, monkeys, and apes, placing the social behavior of the primates in the context of appropriate ecological and evolutionary theory. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 154AThe Evolution of Primate Behavior (5) Review all entries Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 054 or EVE 010 recommended. Examines ecological diversity and evolution of social systems of prosimians, monkeys, and apes, placing the social behavior of the primates in the context of appropriate ecological and evolutionary theory. (Letter.) GE credit: SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
ANT 154BPrimate Evolutionary Ecology (5) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or EVE 010 recommended. Examination of the ecology of primates within an evolutionary framework. Theoretical concepts in individual, population, and community ecology, illustrated with primate (and other vertebrate) examples, with additional discussion of primate and rainforest conservation. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, WE. Effective: 2017 Winter Quarter.
ANT 154CPrimate Behavior: Methods & Experimental Design (2) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (ANT 054 or ANT 154A or ANT 154B or NPB 102); (STA 013 or STA 013Y or STA 032 or STA 100 or SOC 046B); ANT 154CL (can be concurrent). Pass One restricted to upper division ANT majors; concurrent enrollment in ANT 154CL required. Scientific methods of studying, describing and analyzing the behavior and ecology of primates. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: QL, SE, SL. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
ANT 154CLLaboratory in Primate Behavior (4) Review all entries Historical
Laboratory—6 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): (ANT 054 or ANT 154A or ANT 154BN); STA 013; Or equivalent of STA 013. Design and conduct of scientific "field studies" of the behavior of group-living primates at the California National Primate Research Center. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, WE. Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
ANT 154CLLaboratory in Primate Behavior (4) Review all entries Active
Laboratory—6 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): (ANT 054 or ANT 154A or ANT 154B or NPB 102); (STA 013 or STA 013Y or STA 032 or STA 100 or SOC 046B); ANT 154C (can be concurrent); Concurrent enrollment with ANT 154C required. Pass One restricted to upper division Anthropology majors only. Design and conduct of scientific "field studies" of the behavior of group-living primates at the California National Primate Research Center. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, WE. Effective: 2018 Fall Quarter.
ANT 155Primate Conservation Biology (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 054 recommended. Study of the taxonomic, ecological and cultural diversity of Primates and how human activities impact tropical ecosystems. Emphasis on case studies and applied research methods. Includes discussion about career opportunities in conservation. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SL. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
ANT 156AHuman Osteology (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 001Y recommended. Not open to students who have previously completed course 156. Human skeleton from archaeological, forensic, and paleontological perspectives, including anatomical nomenclature, variation with sex and age, function, evolution, growth, and development of bones and teeth. Hands-on study and identification of human skeletal remains. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 156BAdvanced Human Osteology (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 156A; Or equivalent. Human skeletons from archaeological, forensic, and paleontological contexts. Bone and tooth structure, growth, and development; measurement, statistics, and biomechanics; assessment of age, sex, weight, height, and ancestry; and indicators of illness, injuries, diet, and activities. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2009 Spring Quarter.
ANT 157Anthropological Genetics (3) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or BIS 002C recommended. Method and theory of genetic and genomic analysis of molecular evolution of human and non-human primate populations. Special attention to the molecular evolutionary transition to humans and genetic differences among extant human populations and their adaptive significance. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 157LLaboratory in Anthropological Genetics (2) Active
Lecture—1 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 157 (can be concurrent); ANT 001 or BIS 002C recommended; enrolled in ANT 157 concurrently or following. Methods for identifying genetic variation in human blood group antigens, serum proteins and red cell enzymes (hemaglutination), general electrophoresis on starch, cellulose acetate and polyacrylamide, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis on agarase. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 158The Evolution of Females and Males: Biological Perspective (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 recommended. Current theoretical frameworks for explaining the evolution of sex differences and for understanding the interrelationship between biological processes and cultural construction of gender roles. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 159Molecular Anthropology of Native America (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 001Y or BIS 002B; or Consent of Instructor. Use of DNA and other genetic polymorphisms to test hypotheses regarding genetic relationships among different Native American tribal groups and about prehistoric population replacements and migrations to and within the Americas. Integration with craniometric, archaeological, paleoenvironmental, linguistic and ethnohistorical evidence. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE. Effective: 2018 Spring Quarter.
ANT 160Neandertals and Modern Human Origins (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 001Y or equivalent recommended. Origins, evolution, and disappearance of Neandertals. Emergence of humans like us in both anatomy and behavior. Interpretation of the fossil and archaeological records of Europe and Africa. Genetics of living and fossil humans. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 170Archeological Theory and Method (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Introduction to history and development of archeological theory and method, with particular emphasis on the basic dependence of the latter on the former. Stress is on historical development of archaeology in the New World. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 172New World Prehistory: The First Arrivals (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Survey of data relating to the peopling of the New World. Cultural adaptation and development of early inhabitants of North and South America. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 173New World Prehistory: Archaic Adaptations (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 003 recommended. Introduction to and survey of prehistoric hunting and gathering adaptations across North America with particular emphasis on the East, Southeast, Midwest, Plains, Southwest, and Northwest. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 174European Prehistory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Survey of the prehistory of Europe from its earliest human inhabitants, to the Neandertals and first modern humans, and through early agricultural and complex societies. Analysis and interpretation of the European archaeological record for understanding human dispersals into Europe. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 175Andean Prehistory: Archaeology of the Incas and their Ancestors (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Prehistory of the Andean region, especially Peru, from the earliest hunting and gathering societies through the Inca. Focus on the use of archaeological data to reconstruct ancient human adaptations to the varied Andean environments. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 176Prehistory of California and the Great Basin (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 003 recommended. Description and analysis of the prehistoric peoples of California and the Great Basin from earliest times to European contact. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, DD, SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 177African Prehistory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Survey of prehistory of Africa from early human ancestors, through modern human origins, and into early agricultural and complex societies and the Bantu expansion. Analysis and interpretation of the African archaeological record, incorporating human paleontology and genetics. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 178Hunter-Gatherers (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Study and interpretation of the ancient and modern lifeway in which peoples support themselves with primitive technologies and without benefit of domesticated plants and animals. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WC, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 179Asian Prehistory (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Survey of the prehistory of Asia from the earliest human occupations to the rise of complex societies. Special focus on fossil and archeological records. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 180Zooarchaeology (4) Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 001 or ANT 003 recommended. Restricted to junior or senior standing. Theories and methods for studying animal skeletal remains from archaeological sites. Identification and quantification of zooarchaeological material, cultural and natural processes affecting animal bones pre- and postburial, and use of faunal remains for determining past human diets and past environments. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 181 Archaeological Field Methods (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003. Survey of archeological field methods and techniques. Strategies for survey and site location, mapping of artifacts and features, geophysical techniques, and hand excavation and analysis of stratigraphy. (Letter.) GE credit: DD, SE, SL, SS. Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
ANT 181LField Course in Archeological Methods (4) Active
Fieldwork—5 session(s); Lecture/Discussion—5 session(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 181; or Consent of Instructor. On-site course using archaeological methods and techniques held at a field location in the western United States, generally California or Nevada. Incorporates basic methods of archaeological survey, mapping, and excavation. (Letter.) GE credit: SE. Effective: 2017 Summer Special Session.
ANT 182Archaeometry (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Scientific techniques used to study the chemical and physical properties of archaeological materials. Types of anthropological questions that can be addressed with different methods. Preparation and analysis of archaeological materials. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, VL, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 183Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (4) Review all entries Historical
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—6 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 003 recommended. Limited enrollment. Museum preparation, advanced field investigation, and guidance in preparation of museum material for publication. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Letter.) GE credit: OL, QL, SE, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 183Laboratory in Archeological Analysis (4) Review all entries Active
Lecture—2 hour(s); Laboratory—4 hour(s); Project (Term Project). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. ANT 003 recommended. Limited enrollment. Museum preparation, advanced field investigation, and guidance in preparation of museum material for publication. (Letter.) GE credit: QL, SE, WE. Effective: 2019 Winter Quarter.
ANT 184Prehistoric Technology: The Material Aspects of Prehistoric Adaptation (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Examination of the role of lithic, ceramic, textile and wooden implements as elements in prehistoric survival and development. Emphasis is descriptive, but the significance of material resources as factors in prehistoric adaptation, settlement patterns, and culture change are discussed. (Letter.) GE credit: SS, WE. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 185Lithic Analysis (4) Active
Lecture/Lab—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 003 recommended. Basic concepts of lithic analysis. General introduction on the place of stone tool technology in the archeological record. Physics, terminology and methodological concepts behind the study of stone tools. Review of the development of stone tool technology from its emergence. (Letter.) GE credit: SS. Effective: 2016 Fall Quarter.
ANT 186AMuseum Studies: Analysis of Native American Basketry (4) Active
Lecture/Lab—3 hour(s); Discussion/Laboratory—1 hour(s). Class size limited to 25 students. Study of ethnographic and prehistoric basketry from North America, especially California and Oregon, in a multidisciplinary anthropological context. Techniques for basketry attribution and textile analysis. (Letter.) GE credit: ACGH, AH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE. Effective: 2015 Fall Quarter.
ANT 191Topics in Anthropology (4) Active
Term Paper; Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing. Intensive treatment of a special anthropological topic or problem. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 2017 Fall Quarter.
ANT 192Internship in Anthropology (1-12) Active
Internship—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Upper division standing. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the Department of Anthropology under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Limited to Anthropology majors. May be repeated up to 12 Unit(s). (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 194HSpecial Study for Honors Students (1-5) Active
Variable—3-15 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Open only to majors of senior standing who qualify for honors program. Independent study of an anthropological problem involving the writing of an honors thesis. May be repeated for a total of 12 units. May be repeated up to 12 Unit(s). (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: WE. Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 197TTutoring in Anthropology (1-5) Active
Tutorial—1-5 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing with major in Anthropology and consent of Department Chairperson. Leading of small voluntary discussion groups affiliated with one of the department's regular courses. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 198Directed Group Study (1-5) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Directed reading and group discussion of selected anthropological problems. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 199Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Active
Variable. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 200History of Anthropology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—2 hour(s); Term Paper. Historical development of socio-cultural theory within anthropology, from mid-19th to mid-20th Centuries. Focus on original theory texts in context of historical developments in the field as a whole. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
ANT 201Critical Readings in Ethnography (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student in Anthropology or consent of instructor. Critical readings of selected ethnographies that examine a wide range of important topics and analytical issues in social and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on how and why ethnographic writing has changed over time and its relationship with contemporary theoretical explorations. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
ANT 202History and Theory of Biological Anthropology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. History of thought in biological anthropology and analysis of major theoretical problems in the field. Suggested for all first-year graduate students lacking intensive preparation in biological anthropology. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 203History and Theory of Archaeology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Generally restricted to graduate students; outstanding undergraduates with extensive training in archaeology with consent of instructor. History of archaeology and archaeological theory and analysis of archaeological research methodology. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Fall Quarter.
ANT 204Contemporary Issues in Anthropological Theory (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 002; ANT 137; or Consent of Instructor. Advanced consideration of fundamental issues in anthropological theory. Emphasis on critical examination of major contemporary debates between proponents of competing theories. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 205History and Theory in Anthropological Linguistics (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. History of thought in anthropological linguistics. Consideration of the historical development of fundamental ideas in anthropological linguistics, of major theoretical issues, and of research methodology. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 206Research Design and Method in Social Anthropology (5) Active
Seminar—4 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Formulation of research problems and preparation of research proposals; relationships between theory and method, funding, pre-fieldwork preparations, entering the community, field research techniques, and problems of ethics; intensive work on proposal writing. May be repeated up to 1 Time(s). (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 207Ethnographic Writing (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 137; ANT 201; Or the equivalent. Relationship between conducting participant observation of others and writing it up,emphasizing the processual rift between the reality of fieldwork and its written representation. Study of various literary genres and textual strategies used in cultural anthropology. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 210Aspects of Culture Structure (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Analysis of various phases of culture, such as religion, economics, law, and folklore. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 212Political Ecology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary seminar evaluating contributions from ecological anthropology, political economy, cultural constructivism, postmodernism, and feminism towards development of theories of political ecology. Historical relationships between local/global power structures, environmental degradation, and resistance movements. Case studies of desertification, deforestation, mining, conservation, development. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Spring Quarter.
ANT 216Problems in Archeological Method (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Techniques for analyzing archeological data; application to various prehistoric cultures. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 217Quantitative Modeling in Archaeology (4) Active
Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Examination of the nature of archaeological data with a focus on the quantitative and statistical techniques available to model, analyze, display, and make sense of such data. (Letter.) Effective: 2007 Fall Quarter.
ANT 218Topics in New World Prehistory (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Advanced study on current problems in New World Prehistory and archaeology. May be repeated for credit only if material is unique for that student and with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
ANT 219Topics in Old World Prehistory (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Advanced study on current problems in Old World prehistory and archaeology. May be repeated for credit only if material is unique for that student and with consent of instructor. (Letter.) Effective: 2008 Fall Quarter.
ANT 220Field Course in Linguistics (4) Active
Seminar—2 hour(s); Laboratory—2 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): ANT 110; ANT 111. Techniques of eliciting, recording, and analyzing; work with a native speaker. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 221Rural Transformation in Postcolonial Societies (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 223; ANT 265; or Consent of Instructor. Problems of rural transformation arising out of political and economic interaction between national elites and rural regional and local populations under varying conditions of induced change in postcolonial societies. Attention will be given to the implications of this interaction for rapid economic growth. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 222Cities and Citizenship (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Graduate standing. Explores the nature of modern cities, urban socioeconomic life, and urban culture and politics from an anthropological perspective. (Letter.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
ANT 223Economic Anthropology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 122; or Consent of Instructor. Selected current methodological and theoretical problems in the analysis of nonindustrial economic systems. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 224Problems in Comparative Religion (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Advanced study of current problems in the anthropological study of religion. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 225State and Nation in the Modern World (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. A presentation of current anthropological theories of the origins and nature of the modern nation-state in both the First and Third Worlds, with special reference to state ideology (nationalism) and forms of control. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 226Consciousness and Resistance (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Completion of first-year graduate work or consent of instructor. Consideration of approaches to the study of social inequality, and responses of subordinated groups. Emphasis on situating approaches to contemporary social theory, concrete research problems, and political strategies. Topics: formation of consciousness and identity; collective action, accommodation to frontal resistance. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 228Culture and Power (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Exploration of one of the core paradigms within contemporary anthropological inquiry, "culture and power." Focus on how distinct theoretical perspectives--Marxism, post-Marxism, structuralism, post-structuralism, and feminism--have examined the mutually constitutive nature of culture and power. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
ANT 229Gender, Identity, and Self (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Intersections of gender, identity, and selfhood cross-culturally and historically. How the self is feminized and masculinized, and interfaces with sexual, race, class, work, national, minority, and majority identities under different historical, cultural, and social structural conditions. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 230Family Systems and Reproduction: Theory and Comparisons (4) Active
Lecture—1.5 hour(s); Seminar—1.5 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in one of the social sciences including History. Comparative examination of family systems in historical context and of reproductive behaviors and strategizing. A major theme is how family-system norms specify the relative desirability of differently configured offspring sets.Cases are drawn from Western Europe and South and East Asia. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 232Political Movements (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Completion of first-year graduate work recommended. An interdisciplinary approach to political movements of protest, reform, and revolution emphasizing historical comparison and evaluation of major theoretical approaches including world systems, resource mobilization, state and culture, rational choice, moral economy, social class and gender. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 239Problems in African Society and Culture (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Diachronic analyses of traditional institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 241Topics in North American Ethnology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Advanced study on current problems in North American ethnography and culture history. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 245Ethnology of Northern and Central Asia (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): A reading knowledge of German, Russian, Chinese, or Japanese. Lectures on the culture aboriginally found north of the Caucasus-Korea line. Supervised study of the primary and secondary sources. Work with informants when available. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 246Ethnology of Europe (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of a European language other than English. Supervised study of the primary and secondary sources dealing with the ethnography and ethnology of the peoples of Europe. Emphasis upon folk, peasant, and minority groups. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 248Topics in Chinese Culture and Society (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in the social sciences, history, or the humanities. Selected topics in the anthropology of Chinese society. Focus on one or more of the following topics: state-society dynamics, family and gender, city formation and urban life, social movement, labor politics, and religion and ideology in Chinese society. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (Letter.) Effective: 1999 Fall Quarter.
ANT 250Behavioral Ecology of Primates (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 154A (can be concurrent); Or the equivalent, graduate standing. Concepts, issues, and hypotheses in primate behavioral ecology, with emphasis on the social and ecological determinants and consequences of variation in social organization for individuals. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Fall Quarter.
ANT 252Human Evolution Seminar (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 152; and Consent of Instructor. Or the equivalent of ANT 152. Study of selected topics in human evolutionary studies. Each year course will focus on one or more of the following: molecular evolution, primate evolutionary biology, Tertiary hominoids, Australopithecus, Homo erectus, archaic Homo sapiens, brain evolution. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 253Seminar in Human Biology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 153; ANT 157; or Consent of Instructor. Study of selected topics in human biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 254Current Issues in Primate Sociobiology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 154B; Or the equivalent. Analysis of primate behavior, with particular emphasis on preparation for field studies. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 256Primate Conservation Biology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 154; Graduate standing, or upper division undergraduates with consent of instructor. Class size limited to 10 students. Application of understanding of primate biology to conservation of primates and their habitat. Topics include evolutionary anthropology, behavioral ecology, biogeography, macroecology, population biology, and socio-ecology of primates. May be repeated up to 1 Time(s) term paper differs. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2003 Spring Quarter.
ANT 261Modeling the evolution of social behavior (4) Active
Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Problem Solving. Prerequisite(s): MAT 016C; or Consent of Instructor. Or equivalent of MAT 016C. Tools and topics in modeling the evolution of social behavior in humans and other animals. Game theory, basic population genetics, animal conflict, altruism, reciprocity, signaling, and group selection. (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Spring Quarter.
ANT 262Evolution and Human Behavior (4) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or consent of instructor. Exploration of the links between behavioral ecological theory and human cultural variation, focusing on reproduction, marriage, parental investment and family structure; implications of evolutionary theory for social organization in human communities, historical and contemporary. (Letter.) Effective: 2005 Spring Quarter.
ANT 263Human Applications of Foraging Theory (4) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Foraging theory models and their use in ethnographic and archaeological analyses of human behavior, with a focus on hunter-gatherers and resource selection, patch use, population and habitat, central places, sharing, stochastic processes, population dynamics, and conservation behavior. Not open for credit to students who have completed ANT 258. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
ANT 265Language, Performance, and Power (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Restricted to graduate standing or consent of instructor. Exploration of the intersection between linguistic and social theories in the language-state relation and the performance of identity. Ideological sources of language differentiation; nation-building and linguistic difference. Political economic, sociolinguistic, and ethnographic approaches to understanding linguistic inequality. (Same course as LIN 265.) (Letter.) Effective: 2003 Fall Quarter.
ANT 270Anthropology Colloquium Seminar (1) Active
Seminar—1 hour(s). Reports and discussions of recent advances in the four subfields of anthropology. To be presented by guest speakers. May be repeated twice for credit. May be repeated up to 2 Time(s). (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 280Current Anthropology Journal Editorial Workshop (4) Active
Workshop—1 hour(s); Independent Study—3 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Students must enroll for all three quarters. Reading and offering workshop critiques of manuscripts submitted for publication, and reading and discussion of other relevant work in anthropology and human ecology. Track and edit published comments and authors’ replies that accompany major features. Participation in the development of new sections for the electronic edition of the journal, including a "news and views" section and a debate section. May be repeated up to 12 Unit(s) with consent of instructor. (Same course as ECL 280. ) (S/U grading only.) Effective: 2000 Fall Quarter.
ANT 291Advanced Topics in Human Behavioral Ecology (4) Active
Discussion—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Prerequisite(s): ANT 261 or ANT 262 or ANT 263; and Consent of Instructor. Or comparable experience in anthropology or related disciplines. Topically focused, critical discussion of current and emerging research in the field of human behavioral ecology, giving special attention to theory, concepts, models, and methods for the evolutionary analysis of ethnographic and archaeological evidence. May be repeated up to 1 Time(s) the topic differs and the material covered is substantially different. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
ANT 292Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper—1 hour(s). Selected topics in linguistic anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. May be repeated for credit. (Letter.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 298Group Study (1-4) Active
Variable. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 299Research (1-12) Active
Variable. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 299DDissertation Research (1-12) Active
Variable. (S/U grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.
ANT 390Teaching Anthropology (4) Active
Seminar—3 hour(s); Practice—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Anthropology or closely related discipline. Intellectual and practical elements of college teaching in the field of Anthropology, from curriculum design and the syllabus through grading and course evaluations, including classroom and information technology methods, and problems and rewards of teaching in higher education. (Letter.) Effective: 2004 Fall Quarter.
ANT 396Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4) Active
Variable—3-36 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Effective: 1997 Winter Quarter.